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Thread: sudo su

  1. #1
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    Oct 2008
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    sudo su

    what does sudo su mean?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Syracuse, NY
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    3,264

    Re: sudo su

    it gives you superuser priveleges without using sudo until you close the session. It has (almost) no use for 90% of users, so it is not recommended that you use it.
    Desktop: AMD Athlon64 X2 3600+, Nvidia 8600GT, 3GB RAM, 80GB hd, Windows 7 Beta
    Lappy: Sony Vaio FW-140E, Intel P8400 2.26Ghz, 3GB Ram, 250GB HD, Intel x4500MHD, Windows 7 Beta & Kubuntu 8.10 w/ KDE 4.2

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Bangalore,Karnataka,India
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    93
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: sudo su

    That's the terminal command to assume root privileges.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    NEK Vermont
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    Hidden!
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    Ubuntu UNR

    Re: sudo su

    The command is unsupported in Ubuntu. It requires unlocking the root password.
    Instead use sudo -i for a root session.

    See here for more info:https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo

    Also this forum has a policy against advising sudo su.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Washington, DC
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    Kubuntu Development Release

    Re: sudo su

    Quote Originally Posted by spiderbatdad View Post
    The command is unsupported in Ubuntu. It requires unlocking the root password.
    Lies. Putting sudo before su means that the root password does not need to be set. It's only for just-plain "su" that that's the case.

    LinuxChix | Linux User #432169 | Ubuntu User #8495 | IRC: maco @ irc.linuxchix.org or irc.freenode.net

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
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    75

    Re: sudo su

    Quote Originally Posted by spiderbatdad View Post
    Thank you.
    Useful page to read. Now I know the difference between sudo -s and sudo -i.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    31
    Distro
    Xubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: sudo su

    Does this mean any random user can gain root access when sitting in front of my machine without using a password?

    If it does, which password should I have set up and when, and how can I fix it?

    Mind you I cannot believe that it does mean that - it just seems too madly insecure, so I imagine it is my ignorance here. I have done a bit of searching on this but am none the wiser.
    Newbie to ubuntu - loving it - the linux I have been looking for
    DELL Inspiron 1300 with Ubuntu 9.10 and IBM R31 with xubuntu 10.04

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
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    6,115

    Re: sudo su

    Quote Originally Posted by thomaswp View Post
    Does this mean any random user can gain root access when sitting in front of my machine without using a password?

    If it does, which password should I have set up and when, and how can I fix it?

    Mind you I cannot believe that it does mean that - it just seems too madly insecure, so I imagine it is my ignorance here. I have done a bit of searching on this but am none the wiser.
    It shouldnt, but still change your password okay?
    Also no auto logins either
    HOME BUILT SYSTEM! http://brainstorm.ubuntu.com/idea/22804/ Please vote up!
    remember kiddies: sudo rm -rf= BAD!, if someone tells you to do this, please ignore them unless YOU WANT YOUR SYSTEM WIPED

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
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    London
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    Ubuntu 9.10 Karmic Koala

    Re: sudo su

    You use it when root account is locked (Ubuntu default).
    sudo -i does the same thing, drops you in a bash with root permissions
    Last edited by Cosimix; January 29th, 2009 at 07:52 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Western Australia
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: sudo su

    Sudo means "run this next bit as root".

    Su means "Switch user". If you don't specify a user to switch to, it assumes you want to switch to root and asks for root's password.

    When you run them in combination, you are running the "su" program as root, and telling it to switch to root; that's why "su" itself doesn't ask for a password.

    You could also do "sudo sh". That would run Bash as root. But for some reason we tend to do "sudo su", probably out of social inertia
    I try to treat the cause, not the symptom. I avoid the terminal in instructions, unless it's easier or necessary. My instructions will work within the Ubuntu system, instead of breaking or subverting it. Those are the three guarantees to the helpee.

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