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Thread: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    Alright, the simple fact that java doesnt work in 64 and my dock seems to be always screwed up, I'm not willing to deal with this any more.

    What should I do to go about removing 64 completely and adding 32?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Massachusetts, USA
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    254
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    Kubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    Are you talking about java from the command line, or the browser plugin?

    I have gotten around the java plugin not working by following the instructions for installing "firefox32". It doesn't yield a terribly sexy Firefox, but has worked for what I need it to do.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Ireland
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    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    If you running the x64 Ubuntu and now want to go back to x32, then download the X32 livecd or alternative x32 and install from scratch.

    I have also run the x64 version, but found very little advantage as i dont have more than 4G ram.

    Personally I dont think the extra inconvinience is yet worth the little problems that arise from using the x64 version.

    Hopefully more proprietary software will going FOSS or release X64 version, then life will be easier.

    (Even FOSS projects like Flock dont released X64 versions, AFAIK)

  4. #4
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    Re: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    Do I format this partition before putting 32 back on?

    I am going to lose any data currently on this partition right?

    So I dont need to remove 64 first? 32 will automatically do it for me?

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    US
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    Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron

    Re: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    yes for all 4 questions.
    Desktop: Q6600 OC: 343 x 9, 4 GB RAM, 8600 GTS Twinview (22",17"), 1.5 TB RAID 5
    Laptop: Lenovo T61 T7300 @ 2 GHz, 2GB RAM, Nvidia 140M Quadro, 160 GB harddrive
    Remember to mark posts as [SOLVED] when your problem is resolved

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    1,647

    Re: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    haha thanks. you gotta quadruple check stuff when it comes to data.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Darlington, SC
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    135
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    Just make sure when you re-install you create a seperate /home partition so you won't lose your data next time you need to reload, or if you want to do a fresh install of a future release w/o upgrading.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    30

    Re: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    One more suggestion, put your home on another hard drive.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    1,647

    Re: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    youre saying to go

    places>home folder - and then drag that onto another hdd?

    Will this save all of my settings and changes I've done to 64 and transfer them over to 32?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    30

    Re: Removing 64 and replacing it with 32 - whats the easiest way?

    Quote Originally Posted by PsychedelicWonders View Post
    youre saying to go

    places>home folder - and then drag that onto another hdd?

    Will this save all of my settings and changes I've done to 64 and transfer them over to 32?
    I am assuming 2 things here.
    1) The config files for the 64bit and 32bit versions of the programs are the same. ??? I'm unsure.
    2) Your refering to personal settings and not program settings that might be in /etc/??? or /var/

    What it won't save is, programs you may have installed.

    what it will save are documents you've written, program USER settings, etc..

    I'd use cp -a or better yet, here's an rsync example for you: It should get the archive bit's for you.

    rsync -av /home/ /media/other_hard_drive/home/

    When you get the new system up and running, you can reverse this. Like this.

    rsync -av /media/other_hard_drive/home/ /home/

    The wording of your questions is making me nervous. Do you have another hard drive we can backup the whole machine to?

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