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Thread: [SOLVED] Hard Drive Failure?

  1. #21
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    Re: Hard Drive Failure?

    Quote Originally Posted by seuzy13 View Post
    I uploaded some photos of the hard drive:
    http://s3.supload.com/free/P6300011.JPG/view/
    http://s3.supload.com/free/P6300012.JPG/view/
    http://s3.supload.com/free/P6300013.JPG/view/

    Either I'm not looking from the right angle (I removed too much/too little) or it looks nothing like the pics on newegg. However, it does look like this pic from ebay with some slight differences.

    Also, there's this tidbit of info on the sticker, "This drive is manufactured by Seagate for OEM distribution. For product information or technicall suport, please contact your system OEM."

    Is this not good?
    This looks like a standard 44-pin IDE connector. Any 44-pin ATA/IDE device should fit in the laptop. Also, if you want to buy a part that converts 44 pin to the normal 40 pin found on most not-so-new desktop computers, I would use an external hard drive enclosure rather than a converter. That way you can plug the drive in to the USB port, rather than cracking the case open on a computer - also some converters are really cheaply made, and can fry your drive.

    If you logic board on your drive is fried, you can do as previously suggested and buy another drive of the same make/model and switch the logic boards (you'll need a special tool - I believe a hex-head? screwdriver). If you do that, your logic board will probably need the same version of firmware - be sure that you get one with the same version (you may have to call customer support, if that's easier for you).

  2. #22
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    Re: Hard Drive Failure?

    I did the best I could. My camera's not very good and wouldn't focus well that close up. This one was the best I got.

    http://s3.supload.com/free/P6300019.JPG/view/


    EDIT:

    This looks like a standard 44-pin IDE connector. Any 44-pin ATA/IDE device should fit in the laptop. Also, if you want to buy a part that converts 44 pin to the normal 40 pin found on most not-so-new desktop computers, I would use an external hard drive enclosure rather than a converter. That way you can plug the drive in to the USB port, rather than cracking the case open on a computer - also some converters are really cheaply made, and can fry your drive.

    If you logic board on your drive is fried, you can do as previously suggested and buy another drive of the same make/model and switch the logic boards (you'll need a special tool - I believe a hex-head? screwdriver). If you do that, your logic board will probably need the same version of firmware - be sure that you get one with the same version (you may have to call customer support, if that's easier for you).
    Ah, thank you. Didn't see your post on the next page.

    So, would something such as this work? I looked it up on seagate.com and it is a 44-pin connector, but it doesn't look exactly like mine. It has two extra pins off to the side, while mine has four little pins arranged in a square off to the side. These four don't appear to plug into any thing when I connect the hard drive.

    I looked up my hard drive model too (don't know why I didn't think about it before). It's a ST94011A, and it's listed as having 44 pins as well. But I'm still wondering about the differences in placement, etc.

    One more thing, I've been looking at the place where the hard drive plugs in, and it is built with screws or metal blockings of some sort around the place where the pins are inserted, so that if the pins don't stick out from the hard drive, they won't be able to plug in, because the sides of the hard drive would hit the screws/blockings. Not sure how to describe it, but that doesn't look very promising considering how the various hard drives I've been looking at are shaped. For example, this one would not fit because either side around the pins would hit the screws and you wouldn't be able to get the pins in.
    Last edited by seuzy13; June 30th, 2008 at 09:03 PM.

  3. #23
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    Wink Re: Hard Drive Failure?

    Quote Originally Posted by seuzy13 View Post
    I did the best I could. My camera's not very good and wouldn't focus well that close up. This one was the best I got.

    http://s3.supload.com/free/P6300019.JPG/view/


    EDIT:



    Ah, thank you. Didn't see your post on the next page.

    So, would something such as this work?
    Yes, and in my humble opinion Seagate makes the best drives - most have a 5 year warranty.

    I looked it up on seagate.com and it is a 44-pin connector, but it doesn't look exactly like mine. It has two extra pins off to the side, while mine has four little pins arranged in a square off to the side. These four don't appear to plug into any thing when I connect the hard drive.
    These are the pin jumpers - most likely there is another device that is attached to the same cable (probably the CD rom). The pin jumpers tell the BIOS what the device is on the cable. So if one end of the cable is plugged into the main board, and the other end is connected to the hard drive, and there is a device also connected to the middle connector in the cable, then the hard drive would be the "master" or device 0 or something like that, and the cd rom would be the slave or device 1. If you look on your hard drive there is probably a little guide printed that shows what way to put the pin jumper on to set the drive to a certain mode - either master, slave, or cable-select. Look at that guide to determine which one your drive was set to, and use the guide on the new drive to set it to the same mode. I'm guessing from your post that your drive probably is missing the pin jumper - it just has the little wires but not a tiny plastic thing that you slide onto two of the pins - what two pins you slide this jumper on is what sets the master/slave/cable select setting. Sometimes taking the pin completely off is also a setting (like on mine you take the pin off to set it to master). Look on your guide on your old drive to see what it means if there is no pin jumper - it's probably master - and be sure to set your new drive to that same setting (also probably by just removing the jumper, but it is different with every drive).

    I looked up my hard drive model too (don't know why I didn't think about it before). It's a ST94011A, and it's listed as having 44 pins as well. But I'm still wondering about the differences in placement, etc.

    One more thing, I've been looking at the place where the hard drive plugs in, and it is built with screws or metal blockings of some sort around the place where the pins are inserted, so that if the pins don't stick out from the hard drive, they won't be able to plug in, because the sides of the hard drive would hit the screws/blockings. Not sure how to describe it, but that doesn't look very promising considering how the various hard drives I've been looking at are shaped. For example, this one would not fit because either side around the pins would hit the screws and you wouldn't be able to get the pins in.
    I suppose that you could buy a replacement drive from the manufacturer to make sure, but I would try hard to find a good Seagate drive that would fit.

  4. #24
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    Re: Hard Drive Failure?

    So, you're saying that the two "extra" long pins on a new hard drive could be removed? If so, what do I do about the sides surrounding the pins? For example, this hard drive is the same model as mine, but it looks slightly different, having the pin sort of enclosed on either side. The pins on mine all stick out from the hard drive (you can see on the pictures I posted).

    I left a post on the forum of my computer's manufacturer, but it could be days before they get back to me...
    Last edited by seuzy13; July 1st, 2008 at 04:31 PM.

  5. #25
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    Re: Hard Drive Failure?

    Quote Originally Posted by seuzy13 View Post
    So, you're saying that the two "extra" long pins on a new hard drive could be removed? If so, what do I do about the sides surrounding the pins? For example, this hard drive is the same model as mine, but it looks slightly different, having the pin sort of enclosed on either side. The pins on mine all stick out from the hard drive (you can see on the pictures I posted).

    I left a post on the forum of my computer's manufacturer, but it could be days before they get back to me...
    The pins themselves cannot be removed - the little plastic part (which can be seen in this link and if you look closely in the link you just posted) is moved into different positions on those "extra" pins to reflect one of the positions listed on the chart printed on the front of your drive.

    Also, there are different versions of most drive models. So even if it is a Seagate Barracuda for example a drive from one year/version may look a little different from another exact same drive model from a different year.

  6. #26
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    Re: Hard Drive Failure?

    If you mean the gray part in the picture I posted, I'm not talking about that, because mine has one of those too. I'm talking about how it would be physically impossible to insert one of these drives, because the place where it plugs into the motherboard is built inward, so that if there is any thing on either side of the pins as a whole it will hit the place where the screws to the hard drive cover go in, and the pins won't be able to go any farther and won't be able to plug in as a result.

    Now, my drive does have a guide on the front. The master is listed with six pins without jumpers. Four are arranged in a square and two are off to the side a little in their own column. Thing is, my hard drive has one row of pins and then four little pins in a square. Two of them have a sort of half-jumper on them that only covers them half way. The part that doesn't make any sense is that there is no place for these four to plug in for aforementioned reasons, so anything you do to them won't be detected anyway. =/ Really confusing.

  7. #27
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    Re: Hard Drive Failure?

    I got a reply from the support forum of my computer's manufacturer. Apparently, my drive has an "intermediate connector" attached to it, which is allowing it to plug into the laptop. Attaching the same connector to any hard drive would fix the problem I've been describing. The connector is damaged, and I'm still waiting on word as to what kind of connector to replace it with.

    In the meantime, I think this thread should be marked solved, but if you know anything about intermediate connectors and want to post with advice, by all means do so.

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