View Poll Results: What does "ready for the desktop" mean to you?

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  • Any person can install it on any computer without any problems

    1,609 34.95%
  • Anyone can use it once it's already been installed and configured

    2,414 52.43%
  • Every commercial application works on it

    453 9.84%
  • Nothing--it's a nonsensical term

    704 15.29%
  • It automatically detects most hardware without the need to hunt down drivers

    2,236 48.57%
  • It comes preinstalled on computers so novice users don't have to install it

    889 19.31%
  • It's suitable to the needs of most beginner users but not necessarily to most intermediate ones

    568 12.34%
  • Windows and nothing else... not even Mac OS X

    46 1.00%
  • Works on my desktop

    1,199 26.04%
  • Other (please explain)

    166 3.61%
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Thread: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

  1. #8181
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by entangled View Post
    I agree that a lot of linux desktop interactions are incomplete. I think this depends on the developer and how much users care.

    For instance, in my opinion, k3b has been well developed and maintained from a user viewpoint. On the other hand, again in my opinion, gnome network-manager looks as if little consideration has been given to the ordinary user. The performance and value of these apps reflects the care taken by the developer to consider and consult the user.
    I agree with your general sentiment, but I disagree with your example. I use a Windows laptop for my new job, and I also troubleshoot my wife's wireless connection on her Mac Powerbook. The Gnome Network Manager may not be a pretty-looking applet, but it is functionally superior to Windows and Mac for connecting to wireless networks.

    In Windows, I have to click on it to have a separate window appear to select from available wireless networks. It is often unable to connect to my preferred network, for whatever reason. It isn't immediately obvious how to manually connect to a network that isn't listed (I had to dig around to find that).

    In Mac, if my wife wants to reset the connection to the wireless network, she has to either manually enter a "new" network, turn the Airport thing off and then on again, or try to log on to another network and fail and go back to the old network.

    In Ubuntu, if I want to select my network again (refresh the connection), I just select it again. It's in an easy drop-down list, and Network Manager makes it pretty obvious ("Connect to Other Wireless Network") how to manually add one that doesn't appear in the list. It also gives you the signal strength for all available networks and an icon to indicate whether you need a password to connect or not.

    I don't see how that "gives little consideration" to "the ordinary user."

  2. #8182
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by prizrak View Post
    One of my biggest gripes with Linux is that alot of support is done halfway. Bluetooth for instance, yes it can see my BT adapter, I can transfer the files and by jumping through some serious hoops I can get DUN working. However, the tools available are user unfriendly to the max, documentation is scarce and I cannot for the life of me get my headphones to pair. Same with tablets, the device is recognized and setup but there is no way, that I know of, to calibrate it so it ends up being quite a bit off near the edges.

    Granted those things aren't necessarily deal breakers and are probably useless to a good number of people out there but it's still something there is very little excuse for. I mean the support is there all that is needed is an actual, usable front end.
    I think the reason that a lot of things are done halfway is two-fold: there isn't enough money involved in Desktop Linux and also that Desktop Linux is immature.

    Windows was designed as a desktop system from the start whereas the emphasis on the desktop only recently (as in a couple of years) started for Linux.

    My personal opinion is that Ubuntu is the only distro that really understands what it takes to make a desktop. All the others forget the details.

  3. #8183
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by aysiu View Post
    I agree with your general sentiment, but I disagree with your example. I use a Windows laptop for my new job, and I also troubleshoot my wife's wireless connection on her Mac Powerbook. The Gnome Network Manager may not be a pretty-looking applet, but it is functionally superior to Windows and Mac for connecting to wireless networks.

    In Windows, I have to click on it to have a separate window appear to select from available wireless networks. It is often unable to connect to my preferred network, for whatever reason. It isn't immediately obvious how to manually connect to a network that isn't listed (I had to dig around to find that).

    In Mac, if my wife wants to reset the connection to the wireless network, she has to either manually enter a "new" network, turn the Airport thing off and then on again, or try to log on to another network and fail and go back to the old network.

    In Ubuntu, if I want to select my network again (refresh the connection), I just select it again. It's in an easy drop-down list, and Network Manager makes it pretty obvious ("Connect to Other Wireless Network") how to manually add one that doesn't appear in the list. It also gives you the signal strength for all available networks and an icon to indicate whether you need a password to connect or not.

    I don't see how that "gives little consideration" to "the ordinary user."
    To add to that, the XP wireless utility only goes by network SSID for connections. So for instance if you were on a network called "linksys" and it's in your preferred networks, when you shutdown and go to a different location if there is a network called "linksys" it will connect to it again. Even if there is another preferred network in the area with a better connection strength you have to manually switch them. G-N-M on the other hand will check signal strength as well as the SSID so if you are around a stronger network that is also in your preferred list it will connect to it instead. One thing I wish it had is a way to view and edit list of preferred networks.
    I think the reason that a lot of things are done halfway is two-fold: there isn't enough money involved in Desktop Linux and also that Desktop Linux is immature.

    Windows was designed as a desktop system from the start whereas the emphasis on the desktop only recently (as in a couple of years) started for Linux.
    I agree and disagree at the same time. It's has to do more with the developers themselves and how they are. Things are coded by those who know what to do for themselves for the most part. So it's like, "well it's supported and we can use it for the stuff we want, now we are bored lets go do something else". One of the best and worst things about Linux is that you can do ANYTHING yourself. So anyone can code those GUI's, on the other hand it allows developers to have "well someone else is gonna do it if they need it" attitude. Though things are getting much better with companies that are there expressly to develop desktop Linux distros.

    My personal opinion is that Ubuntu is the only distro that really understands what it takes to make a desktop. All the others forget the details.
    I don't know I would have to disagree. SLED has a very good grasp of what is needed on the desktop, FC and Mandriva are also pretty good. I feel that Ubuntu is actually a good mix of ease of use and functionality. I have always found SuSE to be somewhat restrictive when it came to tweaking, mostly because the config files generated by YaST were pretty convuluted.
    Last edited by prizrak; July 14th, 2007 at 05:02 PM.
    Since I get asked alot, I am originally from Ukraine but am Russian by nationality. My nick means specter in Russian.

  4. #8184
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    I wish it looked better. The graphics for the signal connection look like the graphics on my cell phone...

    I guess Windows' network applet icon is only marginally better-looking, though.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by aysiu; July 14th, 2007 at 05:00 PM.

  5. #8185
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by aysiu View Post
    I wish it looked better. The graphics for the signal connection look like the graphics on my cell phone...

    I guess Windows' network applet icon is only marginally better-looking, though.
    Damnit! Can't make a screenshot of what mine looks like but if you install Nimbus theme it makes it look MUCH better.
    Since I get asked alot, I am originally from Ukraine but am Russian by nationality. My nick means specter in Russian.

  6. #8186
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by prizrak View Post
    Damnit! Can't make a screenshot of what mine looks like but if you install Nimbus theme it makes it look MUCH better.
    Can you take a screenshot later?

    The preview image on the Gnome-Look Nimbus page makes the bars look the same...
    Attached Images Attached Images

  7. #8187
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by aysiu View Post
    Can you take a screenshot later?

    The preview image on the Gnome-Look Nimbus page makes the bars look the same...
    Ugg, not working, no clue why
    Since I get asked alot, I am originally from Ukraine but am Russian by nationality. My nick means specter in Russian.

  8. #8188
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    So you're on Ubuntu now and can't do it? What's the terminal output of
    Code:
    gnome-screenshot
    ?

  9. #8189
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    Quote Originally Posted by aysiu View Post
    So you're on Ubuntu now and can't do it? What's the terminal output of
    Code:
    gnome-screenshot
    ?
    It works as long as GNM network list is closed.... Go figure
    Also I just realized what you meant by bars, yes the blue bars on the notification area look the same but when you open it the signal strength bars for each network look different, they are narrow and are not broken up like they are in Human theme. Also have a glossy finish.
    Last edited by prizrak; July 14th, 2007 at 10:03 PM.
    Since I get asked alot, I am originally from Ukraine but am Russian by nationality. My nick means specter in Russian.

  10. #8190
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    Re: Linux Desktop Readiness Thread

    Oh, I actually like the bars in the drop-down menu. It's the blue bars that I don't like. Personal preference, I suppose.

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