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Thread: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

  1. #2781
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    Quote Originally Posted by theDaveTheRave View Post
    This isn't someone else junk, this is your personal junk!

    Each app will have a folder
    Code:
    .[nameOfApp]
    This is where this application will store settings that are specific to you.
    It will likely store temp files in the same place.

    I'm sure that you already know this (after all you've been using Ubuntu since karmic). I understand that for a new user it may seem 'strange' but surely it's much better than the mess that you get with windows?

    With regard to the default location to store your saved files, most apps will default to your personal home directory, often times you will find a setting for a default location (I admit that finding this setting is often not obvious).

    With windows, you never know if the app you have installed is going to install into
    Code:
    c:\programs
    or directly into the root
    Code:
    c:\
    then of course your app may decide to create it's own directory into it's source directory, for including the details of your personal setting.
    That's simply a matter of convention. The vast majority of windows apps default to installing to C:\program files\ (or c:\program files(x86) in newer versions). This is where things are SUPPOSED to be installed, and that's where the system variables are pointed to.
    User preferences are stored in user folders, $SYSTEM\Users\[username]\Application Data\ most commonly. NOT in application folders. Application folders are global for the system. User-specific data is stored in a user's directory because other users do not have access to those directories. It's actually a pretty decent system for keeping stuff sorted out - provided developers follow the convention. There's no reason why a developer couldn't throw random files all over the place in Ubuntu - other than convention. Provided you're installing decently written software in windows - it's not a problem. If you're downloading and installing joe blow's "my first open source app" - you may run into some messiness.

    Remember here that windows is generally a single user system. So where the settings are stored is irrelevant, it is likely only you that will use this terminal.
    This is a joke, right?

    Should you try to migrate your setting from one terminal to another, your going to have a lot of fun, as different apps store things in different locations. I propose that you try making use of the windows 'user settings transfer wizzard', even if you only use MS applications you don't get all your setting for word / xl / powerpoint etc.
    Yes and no. If you're on a domain - you can set up roaming profiles, and your settings will follow you anywhere you log in across the entire network. It's not nearly as difficult to transfer as you might think, if you know what you're doing. The transfer wizard makes life a whole heck of a lot easier though - especially moving between versions of windows. It's also not a matter of "different programs store things in different places" - it mostly has to do with the use of the registry. That's the main difference that I think perhaps you're not seeing. Where as with linux everything is file based, windows uses a registry for keeping track of a lot of settings and configurations. There's pros and cons to this that i'm not going to bother getting into here. That's a big part of what the transfer wizard takes care of - is migrating the registry settings for various apps that use it. If there was no registry - then you'd be able to just zip up the files as you can in linux.

    In the linux world, you can simply tar up your home drive, and copy all the files to the new system, and your setting should be as they where. I've never had a problem with this, and I've done it a number of times, with re-installs of new systems (remembering to keep your home drive on a separate partition is easiest). and after a old system has died - simply pull out the old HDD, and copy all the 'hidden' folder onto the new.

    Nothing could be easier....

    David
    I've done the same thing in windows? Just pull the drive and slap it in a new machine. It'll have to run some updates if you're dealing with massive hardware upgrades - but it's not the end of the world. I can't imagine you wouldn't run an update after doing something similar in linux - particularly if there's lots of new hardware?

  2. #2782
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhattabhishek View Post
    Ok, Honestly, I didn't read the 277 pages, so maybe this has been mentioned before, also, no way is this related to the last few posts:

    Windows can take a lot of money from you to try & get you infected badly, tell your tall tales to whosoever pays them and forces nearly everybody to comply to their standards !
    Linux can't do that! I guess its the philosophy!

    Linux don't want to do that!
    A lot of that simply comes down to the user. I ran windows without anti-virus or firewall software for YEARS without a problem. How? Because I wasn't an idiot about what I did with my computer. I didn't surf porn, I don't just download and run random applications off the web, and I don't click on stupid .vbs attachments in emails. You can say whatever you want about an OS - but security ultimately starts and ends with the user.

    A lot of the problems that I see people posting re: windows in this thread frankly haven't been issues for years, and some of them i question if they're even really issues. I mean, BSOD? I haven't had a blue screen in at least 7 or 8 years. The cost? Really? How often are you upgrading versions of windows that it's constantly emptying your pockets? Viruses - see above. On the security front- I find it kind of amusing. People talk about how un-secure windows is, but at the same time complain about how locked down and closed everything is? Well - those two things aren't compatible in reality. The security issues are largely caused by an excess of openness and trust within the OS, which translates into code being able to run that arguably shouldn't. That's literally the exact opposite of being locked down and closed.

    The other funny thing is that aside from the BSOD problems, I think many of the complaints people have are far more fitting of apple than MS these days. Even on the cost issue you can get free versions of virtually every piece of MS software nowadays. Even visual studio and SQL Server have express editions. You really only have to pay for "professional" and "enterprise" editions (which let's face it, if you require fall ovre clustering and Team Foundation Server support - you're working in a professional environment and should be paying).
    Last edited by Sinixstar; October 12th, 2013 at 11:32 AM.

  3. #2783
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Tetzeli View Post
    Attract major commercial software developers to create high-end multimedia editing programs or linux ports of already existing ones. If you determine professional standard programs by what the pros are using (a reasonable assumption), in the music business it's all Windows or Mac. Same with video (especially video - some colleges require their students own a Mac for film courses). In Wine the best audio program I've been able to run is Cool Edit Pro, which is miles behind the likes of Samplitude, Sound Forge, etc. Samplitude will install, but is severely crippled. Izotope Ozone will install, but you can't activate it out of demo mode. Etc., etc.

    Love what Linux is. Looking forward to what it can be.
    This is easily one of my biggest complaints. The original Final Scratch way back in the day ran under linux (Actually the very first "pro" edition came with a Vaio laptop running some linux distro, pre-loaded with Final Scratch). But it's been a long time since that was the case. Nothing like ableton, reason, cubase, etc runs on linux. The reason i've heard from companies like Native Instruments (traktor) and Ableton, is that the linux market is simply too small to justify the development costs. This type of software is hugely difficult and expensive to create, and adding support for another OS is simply not financially viable. Say whatever you want about the whole "open source" and "free software" concepts - but developers need to get paid, and it can take years to develop these software suites. Heck, for a number of years a lot of them weren't even available in windows. I think Digidesign (Avid, pro-tools, etc) FINALLY ported some of their software over for windows, but for years was only available on the mac for the same reason.

  4. #2784
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    The ONLY thing I ever found Windows to do that Linux doesn't do is keep me from getting necessary work done because of the time needed to maintain the OS. I just bought a new computer, and the first thing I did was wipe Win8 from both hard disks and install Linux Mint. Works like a charm now.

  5. #2785
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    Hum,

    I know what Windows can and Linux not...

    With Windows you can have spywares, viruses, rootkits, malwares... A lot more easily than with Linux...

    And What about this complementary question:
    What can do Linux that Windows can't ?
    Last edited by majukarma; October 19th, 2013 at 01:02 AM.

  6. #2786
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    Sinixstar said:

    This is easily one of my biggest complaints. The original Final Scratch way back in the day ran under linux (Actually the very first "pro" edition came with a Vaio laptop running some linux distro, pre-loaded with Final Scratch). But it's been a long time since that was the case. Nothing like ableton, reason, cubase, etc runs on linux. The reason i've heard from companies like Native Instruments (traktor) and Ableton, is that the linux market is simply too small to justify the development costs. This type of software is hugely difficult and expensive to create, and adding support for another OS is simply not financially viable. Say whatever you want about the whole "open source" and "free software" concepts - but developers need to get paid, and it can take years to develop these software suites. Heck, for a number of years a lot of them weren't even available in windows. I think Digidesign (Avid, pro-tools, etc) FINALLY ported some of their software over for windows, but for years was only available on the mac for the same reason.
    What about Renoise? Ardour? The KXStudio PPA? Something I've found out about Linux is that it can do everything you need to do (I gleefully wiped Windows a few years back from my systems) - but it's harder for developers to get the word out about their solutions, so it really just came down to scouring the web and installing a bunch of PPAs to get the best applications, many of which aren't in Ubuntu repos.
    Last edited by tehowe; October 19th, 2013 at 01:29 AM.

  7. #2787
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    I have just wasted 13 days trying to get a computer to do what I wanted............................................ in Linux! I was setting up my media server in the hopes that Linux would work well for my wife who is bedridden most of the time and Windoze would not let me customise my desktop as I needed, Linux, of course does! Being the good bloke that I am, I decided that it would be wise to have a consistent interface right across the house (three computers in regular use, and a few others). Once I got the video problem sorted (sort of - nomodeset and the generic drivers actually work better when plugged into the TV than the nVidia ones. This took me a week to work out. Nothing on the live CDs to tell the newbie what the issue might be. Now I find that playing video streamed across the network is less than satisfactory, a local HDD is constantly working (the video is coming in from wife's PC) so, I'm guessing that some form of cache is working overtime, the audio is not quite in synch with the video, works fine when in Windoze. Now, I cannot seem to convince the "Line In" of my sound card to talk to the output of same card!

    Windoze ('cept for Missed Edition followed closely by Hissta) works out of the box. I have yet to explore CAD, as I have spent a lot of time developing stuff using Sketchup in recent times and from earlier experience none of the M$Orifice clones come close to duplicating the functionality of that package, I've spent years developing quite complex spreadsheets and word documents, which did not port at all, last time I tried it. I haven't even got to Access yet. Unfortunately, for many users, Linux of any distribution is still a bit 'hit or miss' as to it's suitability. Great for those who are willing to tinker to get it to do what you want, but for "plug and play", in the loosest sense of the meaning, you still can't beat Windoze.

  8. #2788
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    I have built hudreds of applications and websites on windows over the years, but many of those are sitting on linux servers around the country. Windows and linux both have their place.

    I just installed linux on a computer as a test bed server for web and desktop applications. It has been a five day hassle partly because of very different terminology. I can install windows xp, win7 or win8 much quicker and have everything(MY tools) up and going in 2 days including all my saved work. I don't do access or excel. I do very real, large and small databases with very large scale tools.

    Windows has changed over the years, but later offerings store all the information you need in the registry. If you know how to use it you can find just about anything you need. It is a hassle though.

    By the way, win8 is quite quick and very good, but like linux, you have to get used to it. It is nowhere near the server.

    I also have a windows server on another computer for some of the other app testing.

  9. #2789
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    In northern Europe there are several universities and colleges that use a distance learning system from Cisco and Tandberg. An additional feature of this system is that spectators who are not present in any classroom, should be able to watch lessons through a live stream solution via the internet. This system is designed specifically for Microsoft Windows Media Player (WMP) and Apple iTunes. WMP requires a special codec that is available to be downloaded, for those who have access to the distance learning system. Although there are alternative programs to WMP in Linux, such as Totem, Mplayer and VLC, and although these programs try to start properly when you log into the system, you can not install the necessary codec in Linux. I suspect Cisco deliberately avoids making any codec to Linux, but I will not claim anything about possible reasons for this. For some reason the playback works in iTunes without having to install any additional codec in Mac OS X, but the playback still does not work with alternative programs in Linux.

    My point is that this is a typical example of a case where Linux is dependent on connecting to existing systems on other computers and servers, but where facilitation of compatibility lacks by the counterparty. In this way, users are forced to use commercial operating systems instead of operating systems based on open source. This is annoying.

    And, in fact, gaming is a main issue in Linux, whether one likes it or not. Some game developers like Steam® are now developing future games for Linux, and have ported some existing games, like Counter-Strike. Rumors say that they do this because they're planning on making their own gaming console based on linux, and want to have their games ready when a possible release is ready.

    Some programs seem to work properly. But for example Libreoffice, if you're editing too large and complex documents, with a large number of illustrations, equations, etc., the program runs unstable, and often terminates unexpectedly without any error message. Accordingly all work since last save or autosave is lost. This is also a typical example of things that happen in linux-programs, but are rarely heard of in e.g. Microsoft Office or Apple Pages. My claim of the cause for this, is that there are no professionals paid to develop and do good quality checks on software. Everything depends on voluntary effort, and therefore the results are only sufficient up to a certain level. When the use of the software becomes too advanced and complex, the software often encounter problems.

    Linux has many positive properties, like the security level (almost non-existent in Microsoft Windows), the booting time, and the low number of background processes running by default. Also small functions, like the ability to scroll up and down in programs displayed behind your currently active program, without having to switch between the programs, is something that I appreciate a lot! If you read a guide in a web browser, and you're trying to follow it in a program on top of it, you can scroll down the guide by moving the cursor over the web browser and using the scroll wheel of the mouse, without clicking on the web browser first. This is just a small thing, but very useful. I don't think that is possible in Microsoft Windows. And the screenshot function provided in Ubuntu is very great! It is a very useful feature to take a screenshot of only a specific area of the screen, and not the entire screen at once.

    However, Linux works great for most of my needs, but I'm dependent on great knowledge about it, to solve small everyday issues that arise all the time, for example when I've done an update or upgrade of some sort. Usually, these issues are just trifles if you know what's wrong and how to fix it, for example removing or editing an old file. But most people don't have that knowledge, and, for instance, you can't expect ordinary users to edit /etc/apt/sources.list or /etc/fstab by hand, if there should be anything wrong with the file. Thus I can't recommend regular people to port over to Linux completely unconditionally, because they need to be able to do such tasks before they use the system.

    I could have written many examples, but I think most people in here will know what I mean, if they put their hostility to my opinions aside for a moment, and look deep into reality. Linux, especially the Ubuntu family have evolved very much, but it still has a long way to go before one can expect your parents/grandparents to start using it.

  10. #2790
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    Re: What can Windows do that Linux can't?

    Making me want to do what is pictured below after spending many hours working on someones Windows Computer removing Viruses, Spyware, Adware and Crapware so it would be usable again


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