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Thread: Game maker for Linux...

  1. #61
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    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    That was great! Thanks Briana. We'll overcome GM yet! Muahahahahaaaa
    Well, that's not my actual goal, just to solve all our problems at least.
    Josh Wyant

  2. #62

    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    RPGds update!
    The current version of RPGds is 1.0-RC2

    You can download it from here (Windows, Linux and MacOS):
    http://www.indiedevs.com/download.php

    Facebook Fan's Page:
    http://www.facebook.com/pages/RPGds/181910135842

    Italian Site:
    http://www.nonsologuide.altervista.o...p?storytopic=7

    Try it and report bugs, please.

  3. #63
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    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    As for 3D game creation, Blender has a game engine and if you look on YouTube for Blender games you can find videos of several which have been made with it, some of which are very nice, and of course there are several you can download and play like Yo Frankie.

    I don't mean to downplay 2D games or models or sprites or anything (3D models need 2D textures, too), and there's also the artistic niceties which 2D has as well, but the ability to make a 3D model and quickly animate it does make a strong selling point for 3D games as that may be easier, though of course 3D can add a lot of complexity, too.

    http://www.blender.org/features-gallery/features/

    Realtime 3D/Game Creation

    * Graphical logic editor for defining interactive behavior without programming
    * Collision detection and dynamics simulation now support Bullet Physics Library. Bullet is an open source collision detection and rigid body dynamics library developed for Play Station 3
    * Shape types: Convex polyhedron, box, sphere, cone, cylinder, capsule, compound, and static triangle mesh with auto deactivation mode
    * Discrete collision detection for RigidBody simulation
    * Support for in-game activation of dynamic constraints
    * Full support for vehicle dynamics, including spring reactions, stiffness, damping, tyre friction etc
    * Python scripting API for sophisticated control and AI, fully defined advanced game logic
    * Support all OpenGLTM lighting modes, including transparencies, Animated and reflection-mapped textures
    * Support for multimaterials, multitexture and texture blending modes, per-pixel lighting, dynamic lighting, mapping modes, GLSL vertexPaint texture blending, toon shading, animated materials, support for Normal Maping and Parallax Mapping
    * Playback of games and interactive 3D content without compiling or preprocessing
    * Audio, using the SDL toolkit
    * Multi-layering of Scenes for overlay interfaces

    Oh, and here's a tutorial page for making games: http://wiki.blender.org/index.php/Do...me_Engine/BSoD
    Think about how you can solve a problem, not about how it can't be solved.
    Support true GNU/Linux freedom - support REAL Linux standards by supporting efforts for cross-distro app installers/packages.

  4. #64
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    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    I'm reminded of the attitude of "BASIC sucks and makes bad games because it teaches bad programming habits and makes bad programmers." (yes, repeating that does make me feel old). Yet BASIC raised a generations of game programmers and was very prevalent in the founding of gaming. Before BASIC, there were no programmers, only scientists and mathematicians who programmed computers. The following programmers worked on commercial games in BASIC:
    Scott Adams
    Danielle Berry
    Louis Saekow
    Jon Freeman
    Anne Westfall
    Richard Garriott
    I'm going to go out on a limb and claim they would all agree that BASIC limits the complexity of a game, but not its quality.

    GM-like tools might be seen as a shortcut to some of its users. It is attractive to someone who wants to designed games but hasn't acquired the programming skill (or perhaps does not want to). There seems to be a sentiment expressed here that good programmers are required to make good games and that GameMaker-like tools can only produce bad games since non-programmers can use it. Hasn't anyone considered game designing skill independently of programming skill? These tools by their very nature force the creator to make a better designed rather than more complex game. To be honest, most fail. For some, this failure is is a learning experience that increases their design skills. Keep in mind that plenty of games are well designed and good yet uncomplex. Good tower defense games for instance, or Tetris, cand be done with GM-like tools.

    Perhaps GM-like tools will produce a few good designers in an industry that's currently all about graphics with too little concern for design.

  5. #65
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    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    Quote Originally Posted by zerothis View Post
    I'm reminded of the attitude of "BASIC sucks and makes bad games because it teaches bad programming habits and makes bad programmers." (yes, repeating that does make me feel old). Yet BASIC raised a generations of game programmers and was very prevalent in the founding of gaming. Before BASIC, there were no programmers, only scientists and mathematicians who programmed computers. The following programmers worked on commercial games in BASIC:
    Scott Adams
    Danielle Berry
    Louis Saekow
    Jon Freeman
    Anne Westfall
    Richard Garriott
    I'm going to go out on a limb and claim they would all agree that BASIC limits the complexity of a game, but not its quality.

    GM-like tools might be seen as a shortcut to some of its users. It is attractive to someone who wants to designed games but hasn't acquired the programming skill (or perhaps does not want to). There seems to be a sentiment expressed here that good programmers are required to make good games and that GameMaker-like tools can only produce bad games since non-programmers can use it. Hasn't anyone considered game designing skill independently of programming skill? These tools by their very nature force the creator to make a better designed rather than more complex game. To be honest, most fail. For some, this failure is is a learning experience that increases their design skills. Keep in mind that plenty of games are well designed and good yet uncomplex. Good tower defense games for instance, or Tetris, cand be done with GM-like tools.

    Perhaps GM-like tools will produce a few good designers in an industry that's currently all about graphics with too little concern for design.
    Agreed, you certainly should not knock integrated game development environments (IGDEs lol) as they allow access, much like BASIC did, or any higher level program will do. Sure, you can create a picture by typing it out in binary, and every pixel sure as hell might be much more thought-out and well-placed, but neither method guarantees the end result is going to be quality. Yes, being limited by the IGDE can lead to some detriments in speed and quality down the road potentially, but that's also what further optimizations of the IGDE are there to address partially with the help of competing IGDEs.

    The point is, Blender and other IGDEs allow high-level game development, and while some might say it's giving someone crutches that they never learn to live without, you have to start somewhere and any place can be a legitimate place to begin even if starting on a higher level hasn't yet taught you about lower level things. Learning backwards like that can actually be a great place to start, to give you a great overview before digging down into things more deeply. And in one last analogy, it's not horrible to learn how to use a hammer just because you didn't forge the steel yourself.
    Think about how you can solve a problem, not about how it can't be solved.
    Support true GNU/Linux freedom - support REAL Linux standards by supporting efforts for cross-distro app installers/packages.

  6. #66
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    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    Didn't know there was a demand for GameMaker-like software on linux. Silly me I guess. Anyways a few years back (2 I think) I was working on GUI content creator for the Soya3D game engine. Originally meant as a walkthrough program for demo-ing some architecture. The program made it dead-simple for people to export models of buildings and walk through them. I'm guessing if the demand is high enough I can consider making a program targeted to making 3D games with Soya3D or PyOGRE. Something the likes of FPS Creator.

    When I get home I'm post some demos.

    - cmat

  7. #67
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    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    Quote Originally Posted by cmat View Post
    Didn't know there was a demand for GameMaker-like software on linux. Silly me I guess. Anyways a few years back (2 I think) I was working on GUI content creator for the Soya3D game engine. Originally meant as a walkthrough program for demo-ing some architecture. The program made it dead-simple for people to export models of buildings and walk through them. I'm guessing if the demand is high enough I can consider making a program targeted to making 3D games with Soya3D or PyOGRE. Something the likes of FPS Creator.

    When I get home I'm post some demos.

    - cmat
    If there were some amazing game makers that made it really easy to snap together a wide variety of games, it's hard to imagine all the things that would come about after giving that kind of capability to artists/designers. Once the level of "programming" reaches the point where it's more "designing" and accessible by normal artists and tinkerers, that will of course enable a lot more games to easily come about.

    What this all means is that game creation could eventually become another socially-propelled movement like 3D printers, YouTube, and other things, once the software gets intelligent/knowledgeable/high-level enough to greatly reach a large audience.

    And as a bonus side-effect, what better way to help push Linux gaming? ^^
    Think about how you can solve a problem, not about how it can't be solved.
    Support true GNU/Linux freedom - support REAL Linux standards by supporting efforts for cross-distro app installers/packages.

  8. #68
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    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    yep, so who's for supporting MY project?

  9. #69
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    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    Quote Originally Posted by Yfrwlf View Post
    If there were some amazing game makers that made it really easy to snap together a wide variety of games, it's hard to imagine all the things that would come about after giving that kind of capability to artists/designers. Once the level of "programming" reaches the point where it's more "designing" and accessible by normal artists and tinkerers, that will of course enable a lot more games to easily come about.
    A project like this is totally within my capabilities I wouldn't mind perusing it over the summer. Not 100% sure if I'll have the time to do so unfortunately.

    I was under the impression for the longest time that programming is now within the reach of a novice given you can write games in under 150 lines of code with Python. I guess coming from C++ to Python made me forget that learning a programming language is outside the reach of many people. There are many talented people out there that would like to use gaming as a form of expression that can't program computers. If I can't carry out such a project I should post some in-depth tutorials on a blog or something on how to.

    - cmat

  10. #70
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    Re: Game maker for Linux...

    Quote Originally Posted by Joshw91 View Post
    yep, so who's for supporting MY project?
    Maybe!

    Quote Originally Posted by cmat View Post
    A project like this is totally within my capabilities I wouldn't mind perusing it over the summer. Not 100% sure if I'll have the time to do so unfortunately.

    I was under the impression for the longest time that programming is now within the reach of a novice given you can write games in under 150 lines of code with Python. I guess coming from C++ to Python made me forget that learning a programming language is outside the reach of many people. There are many talented people out there that would like to use gaming as a form of expression that can't program computers. If I can't carry out such a project I should post some in-depth tutorials on a blog or something on how to.

    - cmat
    Well I don't know a whole lot about it all but I would imagine that of course reusing code for things like the engine and physics if possible would be a very smart idea so you wouldn't have to redo all that math, even though I like math. ^^ Probably essentially take Crystalspace or Ogre3D, Bullet, and some of the various HUD/GUIs for in-game menus and whatnot, and put them into the editor or at least have them be used in the compilation of the game binary.

    Or you could start even higher level than that and take Blender and improve it, since it not only has game making abilities but of course comes with a built-in graphics editor. Of course, it's the other way around currently, and it's a graphics editor with a game maker attached. It's game making abilities are basic though, so if you could really expand on that and make it even higher level as well so that it's literally a snap to get a game world created, then that could work out great, because then you'd have the power of a model editor in the same program! Once you have those higher-level tools in there that will really make Blender soar, but you'd probably want to add one or more new interfaces/modes for it of course, have a level editor mode which includes a 2D/3D map editor mode and a object placement mode to make it easy to place stuff in your level, etc. Blender even has a way to "compile" the game together to some degree to make a stand-alone game which I tried and it worked just fine. Quickly made a game where I had a 3D object move and jump around the board complete with sound effects, lol.

    Blender Foundation made Go Frankie and there are tutorials on how they did it, so I'm sure there is already interest there among some of the programmers to do several of the things I've mentioned.

    If you could have a single program that had a 3D editor mode as well as a game editor, all the better I would think, unless there's some huge incompatibility somewhere that you can't reconcile. It's not like it would make the program too large or anything either to include the model editor part, since Blender is only 10 MBs any way.
    Last edited by Yfrwlf; April 11th, 2010 at 06:07 AM.
    Think about how you can solve a problem, not about how it can't be solved.
    Support true GNU/Linux freedom - support REAL Linux standards by supporting efforts for cross-distro app installers/packages.

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