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Thread: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
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    London, UK
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    So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    Well for 2 weeks at least.

    I don't know how I'll cope. I've been more or less exclusive with Linux for 5 years (I had an old iBook running os X as a mistress). Windows was no where in my world bar being fired up to play Far Cry.

    Next week I start studying for Microsoft certificates as a change of career & I've just realised that I might struggle on teh Windows thing.

    Most users seem to be coming from Windows so don't understand certain conventions.

    Well it's just the same for me in Windows. I've never really had much time with Windows so don't know where anything is. Commnads kind of make sense but that whole backwards salsh \ thing is a major pain.

    Anyway, I figure the only way I can get to grips with it is to imerse myself in it so no more Linux for 2 weeks. I don't know how I'll cope.

    Any of you thought of going back?
    Tips for survaival on my expedition?
    new lease of life:
    366Mhz G3 iBook running Ubuntu Dapper as a webserver to host my blog
    http://kieren.demon.co.uk/wordpress/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Cameron Park, CA
    Beans
    22
    Distro
    Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy

    Re: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    Being such a Linux and Mac user, why go for MS certs?

    Why not go for Java or Linux certs? Linux certs such as LPI and the RHCE are on the rise. There is a shortage of Linux admins, and they are in demand. As for LPI or RHCE, I'd prefer LPI, as it's not distro specific. RHCE is for Red Hat only. Not that that is bad, but it's good to be certified in Linux in general, rather than one specific vendor.

    Also, there is always a big demand for Java/JEE programmers (if programming is your thing). And Java is fully cross platform, and has multi vendor and open source support.
    "What if there were no hypothetical questions?" - George Carlin

    "Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Benjamin Franklin

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2005
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    Wales
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    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    Windows certs are easy. just be ready with a coffee on the boil as you'll have plenty of time to drink as you keep rebooting the darn thing
    Tony J
    Unanswered Posts Team: A team for handling unanswered posts. | The Blog: http://apjone.com | Hardware Team:A team for handling hardware forums

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy

    Re: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by apjone View Post
    Windows certs are easy. just be ready with a coffee on the boil as you'll have plenty of time to drink as you keep rebooting the darn thing
    That's another thing about Windows certs - they're easy, as compared to Java or Linux certs. Thus, they don't carry as much weight.

    I work for a company that writes and sells a Windows based software package (that connects to all other platforms and supports open standards). I often have to deal with MCSE's (who work for our clients), and it's sometimes appalling how little they know, and annoying when they think they know something, but really don't.

    Disclaimer, before an MSCE chews me out, I've dealt with some MSEE's that were very smart cookies as well. You can get an MSCE, and be a dedicated professional, too. And I recognize that, as relatively easy as the MSCE tests are (compared to tests for other certs), you still have to study to pass them (and pay the test fees).

    With Java and Linux certs (especially RHCE for the Linux certs), the tests are really, really hard, almost excessively so. The writers of the tests (Sun, Red Hat, and the Linux Professional Institute) wanted their certs to mean something, and have the holders garner some modicum of respect. They wanted to make sure that holder of the cert had a thorough understanding and knowledge of the technology.

    A friend of mine, a professional programmer since 1990, and an experienced Java programmer since 2000, just passed the Sun Certified Java Programmer test. Well, he studied his @ss off, putting in upwards of 30 hours a week studying and taking practice tests. He was shooting for a 90 or better, but still got a 73. He is a really, really, really smart guy, with a great work ethic, and lot's of practical programming/Java experience. But the test was still a bear for him.

    But don't let that discourage you. It's hard for a reason - to make you thoroughly understand Java.

    Microsoft, by contrast, wanted their tests to be easy, so that they could flood the market with MCSE's (or MSCD's, or MCP's), and thus sell more licenses to their products (because that's a selling point, lot's of available MS cert holders!).

    Microsoft's strategy is better in the short term, in marketing terms. IT managers and CIOs will think that they have plenty of available talent to draw from the market to implement the technology, and factor that in for their buying decisions.

    But Sun's, Red Hat's, and LPI's strategy is better in the long term. They can tell savvy IT manager's, CIOs, HR people, etc, that the available certified talent actually knows their stuff, and can be counted on, and the technology will work and be robust.

    Anyway, just some things to think about.

    BTW - I have a programming certificate from a local community college. Prior to that, I earned a Bachelor's degree in Communications in '88. So my technical/programming certification is very limited. But I have lot's of very practical experience now, and have garnered lot's of workable knowledge. That's what I'll go with, whenever I move on from my current employer.
    Last edited by JeffS; December 1st, 2006 at 12:19 AM.
    "What if there were no hypothetical questions?" - George Carlin

    "Beer is living proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy." - Benjamin Franklin

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Beans
    300
    Distro
    Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope

    Re: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by ixus_123 View Post
    Tips for survaival on my expedition?
    if you're a commandline user like I am, cygwin comes in handy. I've also installed something called Windows Powershell (from MS) in my XP VM (booting it up now to take a look) which provides a more "UNIX-like" shell than DOS. it appears to allow the proper slashes for directories (/), cd / changes to the C: directory, and adds the ls command (one thing that always annoys me in a dos env) but some things are noticably missing, ie ls -la throws an error, it doesn't allow options for ls.

    outside of the commandline, install firefox, thunderbird, gimp, vlc, yada yada. Even on my XP VM, which I'm only using for porting means, I've stripped as many windows apps out of it as possible, replacing as many as possible with open source alternatives.
    Thinkpad T61p: 15.4" WUXGA Screen, Core 2 Duo T9300, 4GB DDR2, 512MB Quadro 570M, 160GB 7200RPM HDD, DVD+RW, Intel 4965AGN+Bluetooth, 9 Cell Battery
    http://blog.zachtib.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Beans
    461
    Distro
    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    Remember to use virus protection, a spyware removal program, and a firewall. Trust me. You'll thank me in the end. Here are some recommendations.

    Firefall - Zone Alarm: http://www.zonealarm.com/
    Virus Protection - AVG Free: http://free.grisoft.com/
    Spyware Removal - Spybot Search & Destroy (Google it, forgot the URL).

    Oh, and be sure to use Firefox or Opera. You'll get less spyware in the first place.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope

    Re: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by BarfBag View Post
    Remember to use virus protection, a spyware removal program, and a firewall. Trust me. You'll thank me in the end. Here are some recommendations.

    Firefall - Zone Alarm: http://www.zonealarm.com/
    Virus Protection - AVG Free: http://free.grisoft.com/
    Spyware Removal - Spybot Search & Destroy (Google it, forgot the URL).

    Oh, and be sure to use Firefox or Opera. You'll get less spyware in the first place.
    that doesn't save him from those infamous spyware featurers of Win XP

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    London, UK
    Beans
    180

    Re: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    I have to go where the market dictates. I have no industry experience so will be stating out probably at a help desk role. My main aim right now is to get a foot on the ladder, save up some more money and take the courses I want to one I'm earning a bit.

    Thing is while I'm no power user, I spend so much time messing around with computers that it seemed a waste not to further my education with them. I might not be MS's hugels fan but it's certs open the most doors in for me in my area of London.

    Java is not really my thing. I totally agree with you though on Linux. I can see that it's going to be huge soon. I'm dippping my toes in with Linux crtification with Comptias Linux+ but would certainly like to learn more once I'm working again.
    Quote Originally Posted by JeffS View Post
    Being such a Linux and Mac user, why go for MS certs?

    Why not go for Java or Linux certs? Linux certs such as LPI and the RHCE are on the rise. There is a shortage of Linux admins, and they are in demand. As for LPI or RHCE, I'd prefer LPI, as it's not distro specific. RHCE is for Red Hat only. Not that that is bad, but it's good to be certified in Linux in general, rather than one specific vendor.

    Also, there is always a big demand for Java/JEE programmers (if programming is your thing). And Java is fully cross platform, and has multi vendor and open source support.
    new lease of life:
    366Mhz G3 iBook running Ubuntu Dapper as a webserver to host my blog
    http://kieren.demon.co.uk/wordpress/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    London, UK
    Beans
    180

    Re: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    Thanks for teh software tips zachtib & BarfBag.

    I've already installed Opera to browse. I have all the versions I need of Windows on an old pentium IIII with 128mb of ram so I thought firefox might be too heavy.

    The thing that I'm really finding hard to live without is not being able to paste highlighted text using the middle mouse button. I never realised how much I used that feature till now.

    I have to say it's quite intersting learning about Windows. Every version seems rushed though with useful features in one version missing in the next.

    I'm looking forward to learning linux. Everything seems to make sense in linux so I find it easier to understand. Naming conventions for example & dry humor everywhere like fortune or less & more
    new lease of life:
    366Mhz G3 iBook running Ubuntu Dapper as a webserver to host my blog
    http://kieren.demon.co.uk/wordpress/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Beans
    466

    Re: So I'm Turning My Back On Linux

    There are more jobs in Windows.

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