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Thread: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

  1. #11
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    Re: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

    Sorry about the dup link. the other link is https://askubuntu.com/questions/1278...f-a-hard-drive and the accepted answer has the recommended non-destructive command to add bad blocks to the existing bad block list: sudo e2fsck -fccky /dev/sda2 (for example checking sda2). Read the man page for e2fsck to see what the -fccky does, or see the explanation in the accept answer.

  2. #12
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    Re: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

    Yes, now I realize i wrongly used an example from some site, and explains how dumb am I.
    Doesn't have anything to do with intelligence, just a lack of knowledge on a particular subject. We're all ignorant about some things.

    Mounting basically means to make accessible and there are many sites with detailed explanations of it such as the one at the link below. A mount point is a directory and you mount to make a particular device available to view and interact with.

    https://linuxize.com/post/how-to-mou...tems-in-linux/

    If the link below isn't satisfactory, just do an online search on how to create a mount point and mount a partition. You can use sudo fdisk -l to list devices/partitions or blkid or lsblk commands to know which device partition to mount.

    Another site below.

    https://superuser.com/questions/1347...inal-in-ubuntu

  3. #13
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    Re: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

    Typically, HDDs are like car tires. 10 yrs is beyond the expected lifespan and with things start failing, it is time to replace the HDD. 10 yr old car tires and the rubber has already started breaking down, even if there is tread life remaining. It becomes a safety issue both for your data and the vehicle.

    When blocks start going bad, they tend to start going bad more and more and more and in a few weeks, you'll find that the drive won't be seen by the OS or the BIOS and all that data in gone. Best to move off the failing device in advance, then use it only for unimportant things, perhaps a 2nd backup or for a sneaker*net need.

  4. #14
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    Re: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

    Thanks, TheFu.
    This HDD has been used about 100 hours in its entire existance of ~12 years.. Been off, living in a drawer and used few minutes per year backing-up. The problem occurred when power was turned off at a wrong moment.

    What did I do wrong this time ? If supposed to repair with the -n and -s ; why does not report such at the end of 10 hours ? Or where they fixed by executing the command but better not tell the user ? When are 'blocks' the same as 'sectors', or when to use each term ?

    Screenshot from 2024-05-18 06-45-24.jpg

  5. #15
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    Re: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

    This HDD has been used about 100 hours in its entire existance of ~12 years.. Been off, living in a drawer and used few minutes per year backing-up.
    Doesn't matter really. The best environment for computer hardware is a dry, cool well ventilated location but your problem is likely a result of the power loss while it was in use. Did you also try to run any fsck variation on the filesystem? None of this software will actually 'repair' the hardware but the blocks are 'marked' so the system does not try to use them.

    I can't answer your last question as I've never used that particularl software.

  6. #16
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    Re: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

    As I said, time of use doesn't matter. Date from manufacture does.

    To know about the health of a HDD, use SMART data. smartctl is the tool for that. SMART data is only helpful about 78% of the time according to massive and long term data by vendors that use 10s of thousands of HDDs. That means 12% of the time, a HDD will fail without any known reason.

    I've found zero use for badblocks since the 1990s.
    Last edited by TheFu; May 18th, 2024 at 03:57 PM. Reason: s/smartclt/smartctl <--- swapped a letter.

  7. #17
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    Re: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

    +1 with TheFu.

    The original Warranty of that HDD drive was 3 years. The life expectancy when they came out was 5-7 years. before 2008, Seagate had them warrantied for 5 years, but it was found that many didn't live that long, so changed the warranty from 5 to 3 years. (Expected life-span of SDD and NVMe is now 10 years.)

    That drive is 12+ years old. It is starting to get bad sectors. When a drive starts to fail, it's like a cascading effect. Be prepared for more sectors to fail.

    Storage prices have fallen sharply since that drive came out. You can now buy a drive 10x the size for less than half the price. You can buy an SSD 10x the size for less than you paid for that 12 years ago...

    Being cost-worthy is one thing. Being realistic on a cost-benefit is another thing when it is storing backups... Those are important for the what-if's. TheFu and I push Users to do backups. I, and I think TheFu would agree, I applaud that you "do" backups, and feel they are important. That is a big thing. That is what saves us when the unexpected happens. If your computer's main drive(s) had this problem, you could replace your drive, and restore things from your backups...

    If you have a sentimental attachment to something like that, put it in a frame... but it's useful life has it's day's numbered. And it has started telling you that the end is near. 'Lucky' about that. Some drives give no warning before failure. Count your blessings.
    Last edited by MAFoElffen; May 18th, 2024 at 03:53 PM.

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  8. #18
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    Re: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFu View Post
    ... To know about the health of a HDD, use SMART data. smartclt is the tool for that...
    Come on, TheFu... you are waaaaay better helping than sending me chasing for smartclt ! Is it smartctl instead ? Any extensions to the command ?
    "To know the health of a HDD..."
    Corruption of (8) sectors, blocks or clusters or ? is known, listed, confirmed and identified. What am after is allowing the drive to mount to extract the not-corrupted data.

    Checked with -i and my ill hard drive has the smart feature available and enabled.

  9. #19
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    Re: Trying to fix a hard drive; prompted need permissions...

    I saw a quality 1TB SSD for $40 last week. It will last longer and be at least 5x faster.

    Just get one with a SATA connector - in Samsung SSDs, the models that begin with an "8xx" are SATA. I have an 860 in an old laptop with a 2.5inch form-factor. It looks like a laptop HDD. NVMe drives which use m.2 interfaces and directly connect to the PCIe bus in newer computers cost about the same as the SATA SSDs now and are 10x faster than the SATA SSDs. All of them have 5+ yr warranties and are expected to last over 10 yrs, if they make it past the first 30-60 days. Early failures still happen. Some of the SSDs will use the SATA protocol, but also have an m.2 connection, so be very clear what your system needs.

    There are external SSD-to-USB3 enclosures for $10-$30 too. I have a m.2 + SATA SSD in one of those cheap enclosures that gets used for Sneaker*Net needs. The SSD spent 3 yrs inside a server before I moved it to the external enclosure. Enclosures for both m.2 SATA and m.2 NVMe SSDs are available. If all you need is a few hundred GB for backup, there's little reason to go with a spinning HDD. For spinning HDDs, anything smaller than 2-4TB just isn't cost effective. For SSDs, anything larger than 1TB starts becoming too expensive.

    For my backups, I use 4TB and 8TB HDDs. I keep all backup "spaces" below 4TB as a standard. For reference:
    Code:
    Type  Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    ext4  3.5T  3.5T   21G 100% /d/D1
    ext4  3.6T  3.6T  5.2G 100% /d/D2
    ext4  3.6T  3.6T   33G 100% /d/D3
    ext4  3.6T  3.3T  164G  96% /d/D6
    ext4  3.6T  1.4T  2.1T  40% /d/D7
    ext4  3.6T  3.5T  131G  97% /d/b-D1
    ext4  3.6T  3.6T  9.1G 100% /d/b-D2
    ext4  3.6T  3.6T   38G  99% /d/b-D3
    ext4  3.6T  3.3T  156G  96% /d/b-D6
    ext4  3.4T  1.4T  1.9T  43% /d/b-D7
    I follow the K.I.S.S. principle. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/KISS_principle . You can guess which are primary and which are backup storage mounts, right?
    No need to make backups THAT hard for data that seldom changes. Of course, for documents and things that do change often (more than once every 2+ yrs), I use a real backup tool that has versioning.

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