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Thread: Mounting NFS server with "Files" application (getting "mount point does not exist")

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    Re: Mounting NFS server with "Files" application (getting "mount point does not exist

    But I'm puzzled why Nautilus displays the NFS server in "Other Locations", as if I could click on it, if it can't follow through on that promise.
    Because the two subsystems were developed without anyone talking to each other. It's a Linux Desktop thing.

    I can create an avahi service file on my server that looks like this:
    tester@vub2004:~$ cat /etc/avahi/services/nfs.service
    <?xml version="1.0" standalone='no'?>
    <!DOCTYPE service-group SYSTEM "avahi-service.dtd">
    <service-group>
    <name replace-wildcards="yes">%h (nfs)</name>
    <service>
    <type>_nfs._tcp</type>
    <port>2049</port>
    <txt-record>path=/data/shared/Music</txt-record>
    </service>
    </service-group>
    I can see it automatically in Nautilus but when I click on it I get:

    Since I don't have nfs itself set up here I would have expected a different error message but ...
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  2. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Squidbilly-Land
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    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Mounting NFS server with "Files" application (getting "mount point does not exist

    Quote Originally Posted by pep37619 View Post
    NFS is a client-server protocol. I'm trying to share files between two laptops, so I'm using my Mac laptop as the server, and my Linux laptop as the client.
    You are correct, of course. I was trying to point out the difference in computer-to-computer authentication vs user-to-computer authentication. There is not user-specific authentication to access NFS shares. It is just the NFS-client to the NFS-server doing the authentication without regard to any userids. Well ... that isn't completely true, since uid/gid numbers are used inside the NFS protocol to control directory and file access following the Unix standards.
    The NFS-client can be setup to use Kerberos server-to-serve tickets for authentication to the NFS-server, if you like. Also, encryption can be used as well - between the client machine and the server. Again, this happens between the machines/OS, not any specific userid.

    Quote Originally Posted by pep37619 View Post
    Thanks for all the detailed instructions, but I did get NFS working from the command line over the past day. So I'm good there, and I think I will just use the command line instead of the GUI.

    But I'm puzzled why Nautilus displays the NFS server in "Other Locations", as if I could click on it, if it can't follow through on that promise.
    If you have the command like working, putting that into the fstab will make the mount happen at boot, every time. That is a real convenience. You've already done the hard part, really.

    I don't think I've used Nautilus in at least 5 yrs. I typically use Caja, but really only to do file management over a USB connection to a phone or tablet, never for file management on the same computer.

    Unrelated, but if you have ssh setup between a workstation or laptop and another Unix system, it is very likely that the file manager will support the SFTP:// protocol. This would be considered secure enough for use over the internet, provided you don't use passwords, but have ssh-keys exchanged from the client to the remote server. That can be very convenient when outside your home LAN.

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