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Thread: Stuck in Busybox because sda6 can't mount

  1. #11
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    Re: Stuck in Busybox because sda6 can't mount

    Quote Originally Posted by theshin21 View Post
    This doesn't seem very helpful with anything, putting "fsck /dev/sda6" or any equivalent of that command from the website you have provided me simply returns with

    fcsk from util-linux 2.34
    e2fsck 1.45.5 (07-Jan-2020)
    /dev/sda6: clean 200452/16007168 files, 2921954/64009216 blocks

    And nothing else. And the recovery mode doesn't seem to be working either, instead simply dumping me into the same BusyBox Terminal.
    That says the file system is clean. That's good news. Did you run it on all the other file systems? Did you run smartctl (request a test, wait, request a report) on all the storage devices?

  2. #12
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    Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa

    Re: Stuck in Busybox because sda6 can't mount

    Please appreciate that when you bork an install by changing the permissions on the entire partition containing the OS, the damage done is not trivial. Therefore, the solution will not be trivial either.

    Stated plainly, you cannot expect to solve your problem by blindly following a set of instructions as if following a recipe. You must do additional learning to arrive at a basic understanding of what these instructions are meant to achieve. The learning curve is unavoidable and is necessitated by the actions that caused the breakage.

    When you run a LiveUSB session, it is possible that /dev/sda6 gets mapped to a different partition than your problematic one. After all you clearly have at least 6 partitions and possibly more. Since the naming of partitions is mapped during the boot process, a LiveUSB will often map different physical partitions to different device names. Therefore, you first have to make sure that /dev/sda6 is, in fact, your problem parition.

    Frankly, I doubt that the problem is a corrupted filesystem—which fsck is designed to repair. Based on your own description of the problem, it is far more likely that you have irreparably damaged your OS structure by changing critical components from read only to read-write. One must not go changing foundational file structures without a complete understanding of what one is doing.

    I can only suggest the following:

    1. Make sure that you are, in fact, checking the proper partition with fsck.
    2. If the file system is not corrupted, then, using the LiveUSB, you can try navigating to the /usr directory that you messed with and try changing the permissions back to read-only.
    3. Don't hold your breath. It's a vast directory and some files may require settings that are not read only. These would have been set properly at time of install and it was your mass change of everything within it that caused the problem.
    4. The problem with making blind wholesale changes to critical system directories/files is that it's a one way process and repairing it is like trying to unscramble an egg.

    I suspect that you will end up having to reinstall. If this is what you are ultimately forced to do, then make sure you first back up all of your most important data, and also make sure this data is restorable.

    Sorry to be so pessimistic, but assuming you are a relative newbie (based on what you did to the /usr directory), you will likely spend far more time and frustration trying to recover than on a fresh install.

    And next time, do not change anything to get Steam running. I run Steam and it requires no monkeying around with file permissions to work properly.

  3. #13
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    Re: Stuck in Busybox because sda6 can't mount

    Quote Originally Posted by theshin21 View Post
    I've been using this OS previously, I was trying to get my /usr (sda6) partition to become read/write instead of just a read-only so I could store Steam games on it. I went into the Disk Manager App whatever it's called, went into that partition's properties and enabled some setting which after rebooting brought me to this screen with no way for me to get to the OS itself.
    Sorry that I never actually described what I was doing, I was kinda panicking and looking for answers and in the meantime I thought I could quickly post something on this forum and then went back to trying to see how to undo what I did.
    Ouch. Permissions for different parts of the OS are set that way for very good reason. Screwing around with them leads to problems when you don't really understand how permissions work and how the OS primarily uses them for the first line of security. Many programs demand specific owner, group and permissions to work AND those program will refuse to work if those things are not correct.

    If the permissions were screw arounded, either restore from the system-backup made before doing that or do a fresh install. If there are any data or/and settings you'd like to keep, back those up first - the Try Ubuntu environment and a flash drive (or cloudy storage) can be used for data. Don't expect permissions or the owner and groups to be retained in those backups.

    You've learned a valuable lesson. Sorry this knowledge came the hard way. Many of us have learned it in a similar way.

  4. #14
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    Re: Stuck in Busybox because sda6 can't mount

    When you dump into busybox, simply type "help"
    That will give you a list of commands you can use. Sorry, I don't remember what they are. But if you google busy box you can get a list but it also depends on how busybox was originally compiled.

    "cat" should be one of them. Try:
    Code:
    $ cat /etc/fstab
    Mount should also be there. If you run mount:
    Code:
    $sudo  mount
    It should list all of the currently mounted partitions,
    You could try to manually mount /usr with
    Code:
    $sudo  mount /usr
    But since that device seems to be clean I still suspect the fstab file is broken. At least that will give you an error message that might help figure it out.
    More explicitly you could try:
    Code:
    $ sudo mount -t ext4 /dev/sda6 /usr

  5. #15
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    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Stuck in Busybox because sda6 can't mount

    Years ago I got dumped at a Busybox prompt. Re-installing saves time and a person's sanity. There are commands we can run at the Busybox prompt. You need a university degree in Busybox to understand the power of Busybox.

    mount
    mount [flags] DEVICE NODE [-o OPT,OPT]

    Mount a filesystem. Filesystem autodetection requires /proc.

    Options:

    -a Mount all filesystems in fstab
    -f Dry run
    -i Don't run mount helper
    -r Read-only mount
    -w Read-write mount (default)
    -t FSTYPE Filesystem type
    -O OPT Mount only filesystems with option OPT (-a only)
    -o OPT:
    loop Ignored (loop devices are autodetected)
    [a]sync Writes are [a]synchronous
    [no]atime Disable/enable updates to inode access times
    [no]diratime Disable/enable atime updates to directories
    [no]relatime Disable/enable atime updates relative to modification time
    [no]dev (Dis)allow use of special device files
    [no]exec (Dis)allow use of executable files
    [no]suid (Dis)allow set-user-id-root programs
    [r]shared Convert [recursively] to a shared subtree
    [r]slave Convert [recursively] to a slave subtree
    [r]private Convert [recursively] to a private subtree
    [un]bindable Make mount point [un]able to be bind mounted
    bind Bind a directory to an additional location
    move Relocate an existing mount point
    remount Remount a mounted filesystem, changing its flags
    ro/rw Read-only/read-write mount There are EVEN MORE flags that are specific to each filesystem You'll have to see the written documentation for those filesystems

    https://busybox.net/downloads/BusyBox.html

    Regards
    It is a machine. It is more stupid than we are. It will not stop us from doing stupid things.
    Ubuntu user #33,200. Linux user #530,530


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