Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14

Thread: Should I give up and go back to Windows?

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Beans
    27

    Re: Should I give up and go back to Windows?

    Quote Originally Posted by scorp123 View Post
    I do that too. But with Virtualbox. Both products can read VM's that the other one saved for as long as you save in the open OVF 1.0 format. So you can work on a VM in ESXi, export to OVF 1.0, import in Virtualbox... continue tweaking the VM, export to OVF 1.0 again, import into ESXi again, continue working on the VM there ...



    Also not true.

    As I said: you didn't even bother to look, right? You really should.
    Contrary to what you seem to believe, I'm not a happy VMware customer. In fact, I've tried what you describe several times over the years, most recently in 2018.

    I am willing to accept the time it takes to import/export from OVF, but the bigger problem is that it doesn't support/map every setting that every hypervisor has. So when you do OVF import/export what you get is a very barebones VM with just CPU/RAM/HDD and maybe networking (I can't recall if the MAC address is retained) and then you have to go in and reconfigure the VM each time before use. This gets tedious real quick when doing it for several VMs a day, possibly multiple times for each VM, versus a single vendor solution where a VM can be started up on system B the moment it's powered down on system A.

    I know I'm repeating myself here, but just to be extra clear since I wasn't clear enough in my previous post: being able to power down a VM on one host and then start it up on another host (with the guest sitting on shared storage, of course) without any tedious work on my behalf is the level of client-server integration I need, although more (meaning live migration across hardware with different specs) is always welcome. That said, it's possible that OVF has gotten much better over the past 3 years and I'm just not aware of it, as I indeed have not looked since 2018.

    But that's just for Linux guests. Windows guests have the additional problem of activation issues due to differences in virtual hardware each hypervisor exposes. I suppose it might be theoretically possible to have VirtualBox and VMware running at the same time, but that's something I haven't tested at all.

    Quote Originally Posted by monkeybrain20122 View Post
    Not sure about your question. If you have been using Ubuntu as a VM guest in Windows all this time then you have never left Windows land in the first place, so it makes no sense to ask if you should "go back". To avoid all the problems may be as MAFo suggests how about running Windows as a VM instead?
    Nvidia Linux drivers and Windows DirectX games make that a no-go, sadly.

    I touched on this briefly in my original post, but years ago I tried running XenClient on my PC and XenServer on my server. Had it worked out then this would be fine since I could just pass my GPU through to a Windows VM for gaming purposes, but unfortunately Citrix announced the retirement of XenClient while that project was still in the planning stages.

    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesA View Post
    You can run Hyper-V on Windows 10 as well as the various Windows Server version that are out there. It is built into the OS and you'll have to do the same type of configuration you need to do with VMWare or Virtualbox (especially in regards to creating the network switch and other things).

    This is probably not your use case but I have been running desktop VMs off Hyper-V for a couple years now while my server VM (DNS, Gitlab, Plex, etc) are running off LXC or KVM on a couple Proxmox hosts.

    I can't move desktop VMs to Proxmox though, without doing a conversion.
    At least on Windows 10 1909, the 2 ways to access a VM that I know of are via the Hyper-V console and via RDP, and neither provided a seamless mode. If anything, the Hyper-V console is geared towards VM management and administration rather than day to day use by end users and RDP is by design intended for a client to connect to a server, which is why I called Hyper-V on Windows 10 "a server product that's been crammed into a consumer OS" to begin with.

    If Microsoft added a seamless mode to Hyper-V in newer versions of Windows 10, I'm all ears. I've liked Hyper-V (far more than VMware, at least) since Microsoft added proper VT-d passthrough in Windows Server 2016, so at this point the lack of seamless mode is the only thing holding me back from switching.
    Last edited by junk.here; July 8th, 2021 at 03:26 AM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2021
    Beans
    31
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Should I give up and go back to Windows?

    Quote Originally Posted by junk.here View Post
    [...] when doing it for several VMs a day, possibly multiple times for each VM, versus a single vendor solution where a VM can be started up on system B the moment it's powered down on system A. [...]
    Although I do get you may like the "live migration" feature - as I'm not so into it may I ask: WHY?

    As you mentioned gaming, windows and nvidia: I do use KVM with GPU passthrough to play some games on a win10 guest which I wasn't able to get running using steams proton (although I'm still new to it - I may have to read some tutorials about how to use that). Ok, maybe my setup is way simpler: I have both the gpu as well as the storage local so I can hook up the required hardware directly - but as you talk about gaming: If what I asume is correct, that your vm runs on a remote server which has the harwdare in it / attached to it, then this sounds like a bad idea to me.
    If you want to game - do it locally, it's the way simpler option than try to play around with remote hardware and vm and try to rebuild what's basically like googles stadia or such - although it's a nice weekend project for personal research.

    I'm not the one to judge, but I'm the same opinion as what's already said: It seems you used a specific setup for years now, stuck to it, and not bothered to look behind the curtain what other solutions are may around.
    Also: Although you now said what feature in particular you'Re missing - it's still not really clear why in the first place. Moving around live VMs across multiple systems sounds more like a fail-over strategy to me than what should be done all day long for several VMs, let alone doing it for the same VM several times a day. This sounds more like a training excercise to teach someone how it's done in the case it's required - but even running a "home lab" that's something one may tries to do once or twice, maybe a third time to make a YT video. What you describe sounds a bit like you'Re moving around several systems while the still run - but just virtual as they're VMs instead of physical machines.

    So, again: WHY you want to do this and why it's a feature you rely so heavily on you stuck back in 2018? Hardware and software evolved quite a lot over the past 2-3 years. There'Re sure other solutions out there. If it's worth paying for them just for your joy (at least that's what I get from the term "home lab") is up to you.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Beans
    27

    Re: Should I give up and go back to Windows?

    Quote Originally Posted by cryptearth View Post
    Although I do get you may like the "live migration" feature - as I'm not so into it may I ask: WHY?

    As you mentioned gaming, windows and nvidia: I do use KVM with GPU passthrough to play some games on a win10 guest which I wasn't able to get running using steams proton (although I'm still new to it - I may have to read some tutorials about how to use that). Ok, maybe my setup is way simpler: I have both the gpu as well as the storage local so I can hook up the required hardware directly - but as you talk about gaming: If what I asume is correct, that your vm runs on a remote server which has the harwdare in it / attached to it, then this sounds like a bad idea to me.
    If you want to game - do it locally, it's the way simpler option than try to play around with remote hardware and vm and try to rebuild what's basically like googles stadia or such - although it's a nice weekend project for personal research.

    I'm not the one to judge, but I'm the same opinion as what's already said: It seems you used a specific setup for years now, stuck to it, and not bothered to look behind the curtain what other solutions are may around.
    Also: Although you now said what feature in particular you'Re missing - it's still not really clear why in the first place. Moving around live VMs across multiple systems sounds more like a fail-over strategy to me than what should be done all day long for several VMs, let alone doing it for the same VM several times a day. This sounds more like a training excercise to teach someone how it's done in the case it's required - but even running a "home lab" that's something one may tries to do once or twice, maybe a third time to make a YT video. What you describe sounds a bit like you'Re moving around several systems while the still run - but just virtual as they're VMs instead of physical machines.

    So, again: WHY you want to do this and why it's a feature you rely so heavily on you stuck back in 2018? Hardware and software evolved quite a lot over the past 2-3 years. There'Re sure other solutions out there. If it's worth paying for them just for your joy (at least that's what I get from the term "home lab") is up to you.
    I can't believe I need to say this, but none of what I have said in this thread constitutes a full set of requirements that would need to be met in order to switch to some other solution. Because that was never my objective, nor is it the question that I am asking which is in the title of this thread. At most, everything I have said in various replies is simply an explanation of which checkboxes a given solution did not tick during the evaluation phase.

    To be honest, at this point I'm completely bewildered by how a number of different people have come into this thread to offer advice that has nothing to do with the question being asked. I would kinda understand if it had a "try and retain a Ubuntu user" angle to it, but it doesn't feel like that's the case at all. Rather, I'm getting the sense that this community just has very weak reading comprehension skills and is responding to what they think I am asking as opposed to what I am actually asking, even though the question is, once again, right in the title of the thread.
    Last edited by junk.here; July 19th, 2021 at 10:01 AM.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    The Left Coast of the USA
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Kubuntu

    Re: Should I give up and go back to Windows?

    Then ... yes. Go back to Windows.

    Or ... no. Don't go back to Windows.

    The choice is yours and it depends on what suits your needs. That much we can't tell you.

    Closed.
    Please read The Forum Rules and The Forum Posting Guidelines

    A thing discovered and kept to oneself must be discovered time and again by others. A thing discovered and shared with others need be discovered only the once.
    This universe is crazy. I'm going back to my own.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •