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Thread: mssql support

  1. #1
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    mssql support

    My office is finally upgrading to MSSQL 2019. I'm struggling to understand if deploying this on Ubuntu is a good idea or not, and I have a few questions.

    1. Has adutil been replaced by Ubuntu's flashy new AD support? If so, how do we enable mssql Windows Auth with new tools? If not, is there a way to use adutil on 20.04? If neither... I don't know!
    2. Is there any kind of best practices documentation for taking advantage of the new and improved mssql support in 20.04/21.04 in an on-premises deployment?

    RHEL has all sorts of documentation regarding mssql deployment and AD integration but I do not care for that flavor.

  2. #2
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    Re: mssql support

    When it comes to deploying DBMS, always deploy on the primary platform used by the development team. For MS-SQL, that is Windows.
    Just because a vendor claims support for other platforms, that doesn't make using it a good idea. This has been true for many decades. Please learn this lesson the easy way.
    If you want to run a DBMS on Linux, use Postgres or MariaDB.

    Nobody should be running production servers on a 21.04 system. It isn't LTS and by the time you get it to be stable, it will be time for a forced OS migration to 21.10. There is no choice. Support for 21.04 will end in 2021.

  3. #3
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    Re: mssql support

    Quote Originally Posted by jcaliff View Post
    RHEL has all sorts of documentation regarding mssql deployment and AD integration but I do not care for that flavor.
    Why not? RHEL offers 10 years of patches, upgrades and support whereas Ubuntu LTS releases only offer 5. And if you don't want to pay for Red Hat's / IBM's support you could use one of the free clones such as e.g. Alma Linux: https://almalinux.org/

    As much as I love to use Ubuntu as my personal desktop OS and as OS for my personal servers at home ... but for production installations at my workplace I find RHEL and its clones have advantages.

    Just my opinion.

  4. #4
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    Re: mssql support

    Quote Originally Posted by scorp123 View Post
    Why not? RHEL offers 10 years of patches, upgrades and support whereas Ubuntu LTS releases only offer 5.
    Some Ubuntu LTS have 10 yrs of support, others 8 yrs. The first 5 are without hassles and the 2nd set are with some strings for a few systems or paid if you have many systems. I find this to be a great compromise, since after 5 yrs, a system that doesn't get upgraded becomes a fork-lift upgrade anyways and a liability for any company that delays upgrades.

    Basically, a server over 5 yrs old won't be able to be migrated to a newer release without much more effort.

    Ran into someone who said they were having issues with their RHEL 5.2 <<<<---- YES, 5.2 >>>> server. The fact that it hasn't been supported in a decade and was running a 2.6.x kernel didn't seem to bother the business decision makers. That system will fail to boot and that will either kill the company or force them to a new release.
    And a reference for my LTS support statements: https://ubuntu.com/security/esm
    Code:
    Release 	ESM Duration 	End of Life
    Ubuntu 14.04 (Trusty Tahr) 	3 years 	April 2022
    Ubuntu 16.04 (Xenial Xerus) 	3 years 	April 2024
    Ubuntu 18.04 (Bionic Beaver) 	5 years 	April 2028
    Ubuntu 20.04 (Focal Fossa) 	5 years 	April 2030

  5. #5
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    Re: mssql support

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFu View Post
    Ran into someone who said they were having issues with their RHEL 5.2 <<<<---- YES, 5.2 >>>> server. The fact that it hasn't been supported in a decade and was running a 2.6.x kernel didn't seem to bother the business decision makers ...
    Where I work now (since 2019) we still have a few installations with Red Hat Advanced Server 4, Debian 5.x "Lenny" and Ubuntu 8.04 up and running ... . And lots of other EOL stuff like RHEL 5, CentOS 6, Debian 7 ...

    I am now the one who introduced the concept of "Linux Patch Day" (... everything that can be patched gets patched at least once per week, no excuses, no exceptions! Emergency patches get applied immediately. No excuses!) and Ansible (... no more doing stuff manually and then forgetting how it was done! The code is the documentation, the documentation is in the code ...). I am also the one who introduced them to "revolutionary new software" like fail2ban ... those guys didn't even know about that one.

    And I'm using every opportunity I can to get on their nerves about lifecycling those old systems. With success. I managed to kill off a few of those old systems in recent months, but it's a slow and tedious process. And I can't afford to let up, I have to constantly bug them about planning ahead, e.g. if they install something today then they should already make plans when to replace that thing again before EOL+EOS happens, not after the fact. "Being proactive" was an unknown concept here before my arrival ...

    So for me those 10 years of support + updates RHEL and its clones offer are just barely enough given how slow and so not "proactive" they are going about lifecycling here.

    Maybe I'll manage to change that by the time I get retired in about 19 years ...

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