Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: samba hide some files and show zero bytes properties

Hybrid View

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Malaysia
    Beans
    14
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Unhappy samba hide some files and show zero bytes properties

    I run clean Ubuntu install, samba usershare somewhat unable to list files:
    1. Some folder missing
    2. Some file are missing
    3. Cannot copy file to Windows
    4. Large file cannot copy into samba (New SSD, Not broken)
    5. File become folder

    Capture.jpg

    been a week to solve samba issue, I dont know what happen,

    without using usershare, same problem:
    Code:
    [DATA]
        comment = Global Sharing
        path = /mnt/sde1/DATA
        read only = no
        guest ok = no
        browsable = yes
        writable = yes
        create mask = 0644
        directory mask = 0755
        force user = anime4000
    Code:
    anime4000@HITOHA-VM:~$ samba --version
    Version 4.11.6-Ubuntu
    anyone know why???

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Beans
    6,530

    Re: samba hide some files and show zero bytes properties

    I cannot explain all those symptoms but the "file becomes folder" problem may be due to a change Samba made a few versions ago. See if this resolves anything:
    https://askubuntu.com/questions/1328...s-inaccessible

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Malaysia
    Beans
    14
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: samba hide some files and show zero bytes properties

    OMG, this works with existing file & folder (NTFS Disk > SSD: sdb1, sdc1, sdd1 & HDD: sde1)
    Code:
    store dos attributes = no
    I can access these file now, I wonder why that not default inside smb.conf?

    I come across Launchpad Bug #1872476 and found unofficial patch

    These patch works but usershare are being disabled, so no quick way to enable/disable share within File Manager.

    ---

    Both are works, I prefer store dos attributes = no looks clean without need patching

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Beans
    1,357

    Re: samba hide some files and show zero bytes properties

    What file system is the share using? Sharing NTFS with Samba is less than fun

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Malaysia
    Beans
    14
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: samba hide some files and show zero bytes properties

    I see, NTFS and Samba is bad combination...

    here my fstab on Kubuntu
    Code:
    # Samsung QVO 1TB SSD: sdb sdc sdd
    # Seagate ST1000LM024 HDD: sde
    # Managed by gnome-disk-utility 3.36.1
    /dev/disk/by-uuid/30591CB40494A64E /mnt/sdb1 auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show,uid=1000,gid=sambashare 0 0
    /dev/disk/by-uuid/621BFAA802EA7BD6 /mnt/sdc1 auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show,uid=1000,gid=sambashare 0 0
    /dev/disk/by-uuid/1EE89D3623B41F12 /mnt/sdd1 auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show,uid=1000,gid=sambashare 0 0
    /dev/disk/by-uuid/19E093BE26F46212 /mnt/sde1 auto nosuid,nodev,nofail,x-gvfs-show,uid=1000,gid=sambashare 0 0
    Which File System is best for samba beside ext4?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Beans
    1,357

    Re: samba hide some files and show zero bytes properties

    If you are using Linux, then a Linux file system will give fewer headaches. If you need to move the drive around then NTFS is good but Samba may be problematic. You have to remember that NTFS is a proprietary file system and only Microsoft truely understand it's workings. The NTFS access you enjoy is a best effort attempt by the NTFS-3G
    guys which is awesome but will not match what Microsoft know as Microsoft won't share how their file system works

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Beans
    6,530

    Re: samba hide some files and show zero bytes properties

    For the vast number of use cases in a home lan NTFS makes an ideal choice for Samba simply because it's permissions are immutable. Even the share definition becomes easier since all the create mask, directory mask, and the few dozen other parameters become irrelevant. Of course this depends on how complicated a share definition you want to create.

    The only way to achieve the same result on a Linux filesystem would be to do a bindfs remount which gives it the same immutable property.

    The only argument for not using NTFS would be if the server was Linux only since if something did happen to the partition there would be no safe way to repair it.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •