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Thread: Configured Dns over TLS ..... Is this good for privacy?

  1. #41
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    Re: Configured Dns over TLS ..... Is this good for privacy?

    Quote Originally Posted by linuxyogi View Post
    Can you recommend me a Youtube channel subscribing to which I will get to know the latest security news ?
    I don't find Youtube useful for security learning/news. The security landscape changes too fast and developments pop in and out of existence too quickly for such a production-intensive medium. It's great for cooking/repair/do‑it‑yourself type stuff, but is poor for in‑depth analysis or proper referencing. I use RSS/Atom feeds for security news. There are tons which a simple web search can find. I subscribe to the following, but you can easily find others including local feeds that may be more relevant to you:

    1. https://krebsonsecurity.com/feed/
    2. https://www.privacyinternational.org/rss.xml
    3. https://www.theregister.com/security/headlines.atom
    4. https://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/feed/

    Do note that they can be overwhelming. I used to subscribe to more, but found a daily diet of such bad news both depressing and exhausting. It's best to cut back to only a few of the most valuable. I find a good combo to be just one breaking news feed, the rest more analysis/magazine type. Your mileage will vary depending on your personality and appetite for such stuff.

  2. #42
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    Re: Configured Dns over TLS ..... Is this good for privacy?

    Quote Originally Posted by DuckHook View Post
    I have personally conducted a similar experiment in a lesser and unsystematic way. If you install NoScript on FF and turn off absolutely all scripting, the Internet essentially becomes unusable. There are no sites these days that are scriptless.
    I've had a different experience. Most sites will display the data I want without any scripting enabled. For example, ubuntuforums includes googletagmanager.com, but works fine without allowing any javascript or connection from that site. In fact:
    Code:
    $ ping googletagmanager.com
    PING googletagmanager.com (127.0.0.1) 56(84) bytes of data.
    64 bytes from localhost (127.0.0.1): icmp_seq=1 ttl=64 time=0.040 ms
    64 bytes from localhost (127.0.0.1): icmp_seq=2 ttl=64 time=0.056 ms
    my current system can't even resolve that name. I block many domains at the network layer, not just through DNS. The web works fine for the most part - even casual google use still works. I use a site called "xyz123". They are all about tracking and have 13 tracking includes there. All of those are prevented from running. I need to allow only the xyz123 and xyz123cdn for the site to work. Those 13 other trackers - meh. The same happens over and over and over. Allow only the parts that actually need javascript to display content you want. Not anything else.

    After a few sites, you'll learn which not to allow and to ban some.
    Another trick is to use the old mobile website version which didn't support javascript at all. All the content, fast. None of the extra junk.

    How much tracking are we willing to have? Everyone has a different answer. But we certainly don't need to blindly allow everything. It is always a negotiation. Always.

  3. #43
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    Re: Configured Dns over TLS ..... Is this good for privacy?

    Quote Originally Posted by linuxyogi View Post
    Can you recommend me a Youtube channel subscribing to which I will get to know the latest security news ?
    Security stuff requires constant reading. Daily. For current things, I have some RSS feeds and I'm a member of 3 local defcon groups. They use email lists to communication and invite-only discord. I find discord to centralized, so I'm email and IRC only. They each have monthly meetings.

    I use youtube for deeper security stuff, not news summaries.

    Going to at least 1 security conference will open your eyes. Some of the conferences are very expensive, but some are either free or less than $50 for 3+ days. Before you go to a security conference, a few tips:
    • backup any computing devices. Expect to be hacked while there and expect multiple viruses to be placed onto your system.
    • Leave your smart phone at home. Bring a $10 cell phone if you must have one at all. Sometimes people will run a stingray cell simulator and test out pushing firmware updates to any devices that connect. You've been warned.
    • Disable all wifi and bluetooth on any computers. Your laptop needs to be truly stand-alone. No networking at all.
    • Don't leave any device unattended. Even walking 4m to buy a coffee is enough time for someone to insert a USB drive that automatically sets up a remote access back door.
    • DO learn to pick locks. Lock picking is almost always part of this. Ask for help. Have fun.
    • DO take part in the CTF competition. CTF - Capture the Flag. There are variations on this like KotH - King of the Hill where you hack a web server, then have to prevent other teams from kicking you out. There are practice servers/competitions setup around the world. You can also learn by running a few virtual machines in your home security lab. Probably don't want to allow those easily cracked OSes onto your normal LAN. Air-gapped. Please.


    Have fun. Even if you just spend a Saturday at one of the free conferences, these are fun people. Know the rules and you'll be fine. Most of all, you'll get into the group and learn a bit. You'll never look at your computer, router, smart phone, tablet, the same again. You might not look at mass transit, street cameras, and "smart cities" the same either.

    Oh ... and for privacy related topics, point your RSS reader at: http://www.pogowasright.org/?feed=rss2
    DuckHook's links are good. I'd add https://www.schneier.com/feed/atom too. Bruce has an in-explainable love of squid, which gets shown off on Fridays. Current story today:
    Four Microsoft Exchange Zero-Days Exploited by China
    Microsoft has issued an emergency Microsoft Exchange patch to fix four zero-day vulnerabilities currently being exploited by China.
    This is not the day when this news broke. Bruce usually waits until the facts are in so we don't have to follow the hype.

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