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Thread: Running Out of Disk Space

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
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    5

    Running Out of Disk Space

    New to Ubuntu. I have a dual boot Windows 10 / Linux Ubuntu machine. I put Ubuntu on a 25 GB partition on my HD. I researched and thought this would be more than enough, but after a few months Ubuntu started giving me warnings about disk space. Ubuntu also doesn't seem to install any updates now due to disk space. I love using Ubuntu over Windows, but I'm much more familiar with Windows. I'm a little lost as to why I've used up nearly all of my 24 GB on /dev/sda6, and what I can do to fix it. I have put on some software, but I didn't think I went too crazy. Should I start over with more than 25 GB as my Ubuntu partition? Here is what my $ df -h returns:


    Code:
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    udev            7.8G     0  7.8G   0% /dev
    tmpfs           1.6G  3.6M  1.6G   1% /run
    /dev/sda6        24G   23G   59M 100% /
    tmpfs           7.8G  688M  7.2G   9% /dev/shm
    tmpfs           5.0M  4.0K  5.0M   1% /run/lock
    tmpfs           7.8G     0  7.8G   0% /sys/fs/cgroup
    /dev/loop1       56M   56M     0 100% /snap/core18/1932
    /dev/loop4       65M   65M     0 100% /snap/gtk-common-themes/1514
    /dev/loop5       68M   68M     0 100% /snap/sublime-text/85
    /dev/loop2       98M   98M     0 100% /snap/core/10444
    /dev/loop7      2.3M  2.3M     0 100% /snap/gnome-system-monitor/145
    /dev/loop8      2.5M  2.5M     0 100% /snap/gnome-calculator/748
    /dev/loop6      163M  163M     0 100% /snap/gnome-3-28-1804/145
    /dev/loop11      58M   58M     0 100% /snap/sublime-text/97
    /dev/loop12     256M  256M     0 100% /snap/gnome-3-34-1804/36
    /dev/loop9      147M  147M     0 100% /snap/code/51
    /dev/loop10     384K  384K     0 100% /snap/gnome-characters/550
    /dev/loop13     1.0M  1.0M     0 100% /snap/gnome-logs/93
    /dev/loop14     2.3M  2.3M     0 100% /snap/gnome-system-monitor/148
    /dev/loop15      65M   65M     0 100% /snap/gtk-common-themes/1513
    /dev/loop16     384K  384K     0 100% /snap/gnome-characters/570
    /dev/loop18     1.0M  1.0M     0 100% /snap/gnome-logs/100
    /dev/loop17     162M  162M     0 100% /snap/gnome-3-28-1804/128
    /dev/loop19     2.5M  2.5M     0 100% /snap/gnome-calculator/826
    /dev/loop21      56M   56M     0 100% /snap/core18/1944
    /dev/loop23     218M  218M     0 100% /snap/gnome-3-34-1804/60
    /dev/loop22      62M   62M     0 100% /snap/core20/875
    /dev/sda1       496M   33M  464M   7% /boot/efi
    tmpfs           1.6G   16K  1.6G   1% /run/user/121
    /dev/loop24     144M  144M     0 100% /snap/code/52
    tmpfs           1.6G   60K  1.6G   1% /run/user/1000
    /dev/loop0       62M   62M     0 100% /snap/core20/904
    /dev/loop20      98M   98M     0 100% /snap/core/10577
    Last edited by deadflowr; December 28th, 2020 at 09:39 PM. Reason: code tags

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
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    Lubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa

    Re: Running Out of Disk Space

    What sticks out is that you don't have a /home partition.
    This means that all your user data (pictures, videos etc.) will be stored on / which is your /dev/sda6

    You need to think about how to partition your disk(s).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2019
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    Re: Running Out of Disk Space

    I see what you're saying. I have installed Ubuntu into one 25 GB partition, which has both \root and \home, I think. I have plenty of space on my hard drive (2 TB). Can I somehow split out \home into a second, new 25 GB partition, leaving \root intact, or should I just start over and reinstall Ubuntu?

  4. #4
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    Re: Running Out of Disk Space

    It is possible to move /home to a separated partition but it's NOT for newbies.

    I strongly suggest backing up any personal files you may have in Ubuntu and after that reinstall. Previously you should shrink one or more (Windows) partitions from Windows with Windows native tools to make adequate room for Ubuntu.

    Considering you'll manually partition for the new installation in order to have the separated /home then 25-30GB, maybe some more, is fine for / (root) which then will only have the OS and programs installed there is perfectly fine. Give /home as much as you can afford.

    The way you did it before isn't necessarily wrong. Again, 25 GB is enough for the OS and many additional (small) programs. But if that is the same space for your personal files then it depends. I would say that for most typical usages nowadays it's ridiculously small. I have several HD movies each one occupying more than 10GB.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Re: Running Out of Disk Space

    I'm 100% with CelticWarrior here.
    A reinstall with new partitioning is the way to go. Remember to store your personal stuff first.

    I also agree 100% on 25...30 GB for / (on my disk it somehow always works out at 29.3 GB, probably due to the sector sizes).
    For /home whatever you think is right. As you have 2 TB, and depending on what your Win partition needs, 500 GB or more wouldn't be bad.

  6. #6
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    Re: Running Out of Disk Space

    Good to know it's not for newbies. I will do as you suggest and reinstall with two partitions, \root and \home. I think I dumped too many photos/videos/downloads without realizing how much space it was. Appreciate it!

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Re: Running Out of Disk Space

    Unix uses /, not \.

    You have a bunch of snap packages. Those can use more storage than normal, APT packages. Just something to consider.

    /root, /, are different things not to be confused.
    /root is the HOME directory for the root account.
    / is the "root directory". See the difference?

    In general, with newer releases, 25-35G is needed for the OS, especially if you use snaps and allow the swap to be stored inside the / (OS) partition.

    Having a separate /home/ would be very useful for many reasons. I think there is a guide to set that up somewhere https://help.ubuntu.com/community/HomeFolder. It must use a native Linux file system. There are many, many, options for all this stuff.

    May want to have a separate swap partition as well. Older disk sizing guides wold all assume a separate swap. That only changed recently. Some people are fine with it. I'm old school and prefer a separate swap.

  8. #8
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    Re: Running Out of Disk Space

    I think moving a home directory to a separate partition isn't that hard. I expect many, although maybe not all, newbies to be able to follow this guide: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Pa...ng/Home/Moving
    I think you can ignore the final section. I've never encountered that problem. But the occasional sudo gedit [filename] command in there is not so proper, although I think it should be relatively safe if you're on 20.04 or newer. The proper way to edit files as root is using
    Code:
    sudoedit [filename]
    which will allow you to edit the file with the nano text editor (unless you configured something else), which you may not be used to. Key commands are listed at the bottom of the screen, ^X means ctrl-x, etc.

    Use Windows tools to edit Windows partitions, use Linux tools to edit Linux partitions.

    BTW, have you got backups of all your important files on a removable drive? Reinstalling and partitioning are high-risk operations, so you may lose files if you make some error of suffer a power failure. Having backups is a good idea anyway, as hard drive failures happen.

  9. #9
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    Re: Running Out of Disk Space

    I agree that creating anew /home isn't that hard and I think the process in the linked article is more complicated that it needs to be. At least the way I'd do it seems simpler to me.
    Last edited by rsteinmetz70112; December 30th, 2020 at 10:19 PM.

  10. #10
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    Re: Running Out of Disk Space

    Quote Originally Posted by rsteinmetz70112 View Post
    I agree that creating anew /home isn't that hard and I think the process in the linked article is more complicated that it needs to be. At least they way I'd do it seems simpler to me.
    There are lots a tiny steps, each can be very confusing to someone new to Linux CLI ideas, and things that we take as automatic knowledge/skills just aren't part of MS-Windows learning. Things like:
    • file systems - need to pick the correct one and create it inside a partition ... or LV or ZFS pool
    • mounting file systems to multiple places - a temporary location first to copy/move everything into, then the real location later.
    • setting correct directory ownership and permissions. Get this wrong and it is a bad day.
    • modifying system files like the /etc/fstab, correctly.
    • setting mount directory levels exactly correct. Many MS-Windows people never learned relative vs absolute paths and directories, adding to the confusion.
    • If the new file system will be placed somewhere other than /home/, then snap programs will break, which makes hassles for new people who aren't certain what should and shouldn't work.


    Get any of these details and decide that rebooting will fix it and the userid probably won't be able to login at all. A simple, minor change, for an expert becomes an ordeal and reinstall everything problem for someone else.

    More tiny details than experts would worry about, but nearly insurmountable for someone new to Unix/Linux. Doing this would take you or me less than 3-5 minutes, but someone else may need a few days to look up each command. I'm not saying I'd get each command perfect the first time, but I would recognize any issues quickly and be able to recover from those is very little problem.

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