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Thread: Time to build a server with old hardware.

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
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    Lincolnshire
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    187
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    Ubuntu 11.04 Natty Narwhal

    Re: Time to build a server with old hardware.

    Ive taken a couple of steps forward, but not totally successful. I've followed up on the last set of instructions and read up on changing the host name and the structure of fstab. Consequently the computer is now called bigbin-xubuntu, and stays that way after re-boot. The command in fstab is now

    UUID=cf560714-4c5b-47d9-9765-08638b617ff4 /Vol10 ext4 rw,async 0 0

    Unfortunately since I set this Vol10 no longer has an icon on my desktop, and does not seem to be available for me to use. It's the middle of the night now, though, so I'm off to bed.

    Sweet dreams

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Squidbilly-Land
    Beans
    21,639
    Distro
    Ubuntu Mate 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: Time to build a server with old hardware.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Binner View Post
    Ive taken a couple of steps forward, but not totally successful. I've followed up on the last set of instructions and read up on changing the host name and the structure of fstab. Consequently the computer is now called bigbin-xubuntu, and stays that way after re-boot. The command in fstab is now

    UUID=cf560714-4c5b-47d9-9765-08638b617ff4 /Vol10 ext4 rw,async 0 0

    Unfortunately since I set this Vol10 no longer has an icon on my desktop, and does not seem to be available for me to use. It's the middle of the night now, though, so I'm off to bed.

    Sweet dreams
    Cool that you changed the hostname, but I would have done that in a week or two. A quick win is sometimes needed, so I understand the reason you wanted to do it sooner than later.

    When you mount storage in the fstab, it is available. Just make a shortcut/bookmark to that location in your file manager. You can also use symbolic links. Wikipedia has an explanation. Hard-links are less useful than symlinks (aka soft-links aka symbolic links). Symlinks can cross file systems. Hard-links cannot. Symlinks work over NFS too, BTW.

    You can check that it is mounted a few different ways. Some commands:
    Code:
    df -Th
    mount
    lsblk -e 7 -o name,size,type,fstype,mountpoint
    In a terminal, just cd /Vol10 what's there?

    BTW, assuming the UUID is correct, then this is probably the fstab line you want:
    Code:
    UUID=cf560714-4c5b-47d9-9765-08638b617ff4     /Vol10      ext4      noatime,errors=remount-ro    0     2
    What this does is tell the systemd-mount program to run fsck automatically from time to time, but even if that doesn't work, then you still want the file system mounted as read-only if that is possible. Not having the file system keep track of the access times (noatime) will speed things up slightly and for SSD storage, it will drastically drop the writes.

    Every file/directory has 3 time related fields.
    1. Creation time (ctime)
    2. Modification time (mtime)
    3. Access time (atime)

    Knowing when a file was created and last modified is important. Just because some random program read/accessed a file, that isn't really noteworthy.

    Now that you have the storage mounted under /Vol10, you probably want to change the owner from root:root, to whatever your username:groupname are. sudo chown -R $USER:$USER /Vol10 will do that and you'll be able to add files, directories and manage that storage however you like going forward since you are the owner. This is a 1-time chown command. This is all native Unix file and directory permissions. These work over NFS exactly the same way, unlike CIFS which behaves differently whether you are remote or local.

    Life is good.

    If you have 5 other userids that need to only read the files, that is easy to setup. If you have 3 other userids that need read-write to specific directories, that is possible, but you'll need to learn Unix permissions. Here's a post about that:
    https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread....=working+chgrp These things are also 1-time setup things for each directory where a team needs to work together on the same files. With Unix permissions, you'll get it and have it the rest of your life. Since this is the way that permissions work on all popular OSes, except 1 (cough), this knowledge is useful everywhere - phones, tablets, TV devices, computers.

    BTW, when Unix people are forced onto Windows, they have similar struggles. Things that appear the same are not implemented in the same way deep in the OS. Only about 20% are the same with Windows and all the Unix-based OSes.

    Ever wondered why websites are partially case sensitive in the URL? The domainname is not (like a hostname), but everything else is? That's because they run on Unix systems where file structures are case-sensitive.

    You may notice I've been adding a few new Unix ideas with each post. There are many little things that Unix has had for 40 yrs that Windows either doesn't support or that just aren't used in Windows.

    More football to watch.

    Tomorrow, the client fstab with NFS inside?

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