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Thread: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

  1. #1
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    Question How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    Please also see the attached screenshots.

    I have a computer with a 500 gb HD with Windows 10.
    I have created a second partition with 400gb so there is 100 gb left on the windows partition.
    I want to install Ubuntu on the second partition with a grub boot menu so I can choose to boot from the partition with Windows 10 or the partition with Ubuntu.
    But I dont see that option (in the screenshots).

    So - what can I do to achieve my goal?
    Last edited by Odense; 4 Weeks Ago at 05:38 PM.

  2. #2
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    Re: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    You cannot install Ubuntu to Microsoft formats like NTFS, default is ext4, but other Linux formats can be used.
    So select change, use ext4 and use as / (root). Optional is to split space and add a /home partition which should be the largest part.

    Shows live installer with screen shots. Both BIOS purple accessibility screen & UEFI black grub menu screen 20.10 uses grub for both
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UEFI
    Shows Windows screens
    https://askubuntu.com/questions/2218...s-10-with-uefi

    Installer will auto find your existing ESP - efi system partition and will create a swap file. So only / (root) required.

    For the Total space you want for Ubuntu:
    Ubuntu's standard install is just / (root) & swap(prior to 17.10), but it is better to add another partition for /home if allocating over 30GB.:
    Only if gpt - all partitions in gpt are primary (no logicals):
    gpt: 300-500 MB efi FAT32 w/boot flag (ESP for UEFI boot or future use for UEFI, you only can have one per drive, so if already existing do not attempt another)
    gpt: 1 or 2 MB No Format w/bios_grub flag (for BIOS boot not required for UEFI)
    for gpt(GUID) or MBR(msdos) partitioning
    Ubuntu partitions - smaller root only where hard drive space is limited.
    If total space less than about 30 to 50GB just use / not separate /home or standard install.
    1. 30+ GB Mountpoint / primary or logical beginning ext4
    2. all but 2 GB or all (See below if 18.04 or later) Mountpoint /home logical beginning ext4
    3. 2 GB Mountpoint swap logical (not required with 17.04 and later uses a swap file, if no swap partition found)
    4. You do not need to create swap, as it either finds existing swap partition, or creates in fstab the following swapfile entry:
    5. No swap partition for 18.04 or later, it uses a swap file like this entry in fstab:
    /swapfile none swap sw 0 0
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

  3. #3
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    Re: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    Ubuntu can't be installed in a Windows partition, which is what NTFS is. If you first delete that /dev/sda5, the install alongside option will probably do what you want. You can also use something else, select /dev/sda5 for mountpoint / and format to ext4 (or some other Linux filesystem if you really want).

    Some other options that you may find interesting:
    Instead of a single large partition for Ubuntu, you could have a separate partition for /home, or some other way to separate your data from the OS. That will make it easier to reinstall while keeping your data.
    By default Ubuntu now uses a swap file, but you could use a swap partition if you like.
    If you want to share files between Ubuntu and Windows, it's best to make an NTFS partition for data, separate from your Windows C partition.
    Make sure FastStartup has been disabled in Windows (although I think it already is).

  4. #4
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    Question Re: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    Quote Originally Posted by Impavidus View Post
    Ubuntu can't be installed in a Windows partition, which is what NTFS is. If you first delete that /dev/sda5, the install alongside option will probably do what you want. You can also use something else, select /dev/sda5 for mountpoint / and format to ext4 (or some other Linux filesystem if you really want).

    Some other options that you may find interesting:
    Instead of a single large partition for Ubuntu, you could have a separate partition for /home, or some other way to separate your data from the OS. That will make it easier to reinstall while keeping your data.
    By default Ubuntu now uses a swap file, but you could use a swap partition if you like.
    If you want to share files between Ubuntu and Windows, it's best to make an NTFS partition for data, separate from your Windows C partition.
    Make sure FastStartup has been disabled in Windows (although I think it already is).
    I actually tried installing Ubuntu on the empty space before formatting it but that was not possible.
    Then I formatted it to ntfs and that was wrong.

    I just formatted it to ext4 but it did not seem to change much?

    I think it is a good idea to reduce the Ubuntu (and the Windows) partitions and make a bigger document partition - how many gb is good for a Ubuntu partition (and how many gb for a Win10 partition)?
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Odense; 4 Weeks Ago at 07:53 PM.

  5. #5
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    Re: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    Partitioning is unique for every person.
    It depends on your use & how much data you want to save and where you are saving it.

    Windows NTFS needs 30% free to work well. At 10% free, it becomes very slow and you just about cannot do a defrag as no working room.
    Linux does need some working space but not as much.

    If new user better to use just /, if not very large partition, or have separate /home.
    More advanced is data partition(s), but then you have to set mount point and give yourself ownership & permissions to use it.
    I keep /home inside /, but have large data partition as ext4. Back when I still had Windows XP, I also had a NTFS data partition. But as I used Windows less & less, data grew in ext4 data partition, so had to resize. Now no NTFS partitions.

    Typical desktop is usually ok in 25 to 30GB, but if you add server applications and then a large data base, you either need a larger / or move those apps to another location.
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

  6. #6
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    Re: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    Having created the free space, which you say you have tried already, you then need to use the "Something Else" (Noget andet) option at the disk preparation stage, select that unallocated space and choose to create new partition or partitions as you want by clicking on the + sign below.

    As you have already made an ext4 partition you can also choose that in the installer and click on "Change", then choose what you want to do with it from there, which will depend on how you want to use that 400GB space; one partition for the complete OS or one for / (root) the OS itself and a second for /home or data.
    A / and /home partition can be created at installation with the appropriate mountpoints given them; a data partition will have to be made then dealt with after the OS installation has been performed.

  7. #7
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    Question Re: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    Quote Originally Posted by ajgreeny View Post
    Having created the free space, which you say you have tried already, you then need to use the "Something Else" (Noget andet) option at the disk preparation stage, select that unallocated space and choose to create new partition or partitions as you want by clicking on the + sign below.

    As you have already made an ext4 partition you can also choose that in the installer and click on "Change", then choose what you want to do with it from there, which will depend on how you want to use that 400GB space; one partition for the complete OS or one for / (root) the OS itself and a second for /home or data.
    A / and /home partition can be created at installation with the appropriate mountpoints given them; a data partition will have to be made then dealt with after the OS installation has been performed.
    Please see the new screenshots.

    I would have thought that too but I really dont see how I can pick the ext4 partition I just created for Ubuntu. (sda4 Win10 sda5 Ubuntu sda6 shared data disk)

    But as shown in the screenshot it seem it want to split up sda6 into 6 and 7 and that is not what I want.

    How can I install Ubuntu on sda5 and use sda6 as a data disk shared between Ubuntu and Win10?

  8. #8
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    Re: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    You have not shown us the screenshot after choosing the "Something Else" option.

    DO NOT choose to install "alongside Windows Boot Manager", which is something I know nothing about as I do not use Windows any more, and of course, do not use the second option to erase disk as that will remove all of the existing Windows.

    Try again the Something Else option and show us what appears; it will help clarify the situation and we can then give you more exact suggestions.

  9. #9
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    Re: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    Along side will take some random partiiton and try to shrink it enough to squeeze in a new / partition.
    That is not what you want once you have already created partitions.
    You want Something Else and choose (change button) which partition is / & which is /home and format (even if already formatted).
    But if reusing a /home that has data, never check the format box as that would erase all your data.
    Do not forget as I have accidentally picked the wrong one. Installer screen is different than gparted screen.
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

  10. #10
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    Question Re: How do I get Ubuntu installed on its own partition

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    Along side will take some random partiiton and try to shrink it enough to squeeze in a new / partition.
    That is not what you want once you have already created partitions.
    You want Something Else and choose (change button) which partition is / & which is /home and format (even if already formatted).
    But if reusing a /home that has data, never check the format box as that would erase all your data.
    Do not forget as I have accidentally picked the wrong one. Installer screen is different than gparted screen.
    Thank you oldfred - you are naturally right.
    So - which of the options should I choose_
    It is a royal PITA that if I choose English language then alt-prtscr does not work - so this is a photo from my old phone.
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