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Thread: D-Ban on usb won't boot

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    D-Ban on usb won't boot

    D-Ban on usb stick that has worked previously to wipe another drive, will not boot, even though I have the usb stick set as first in boot order. Can I wipe a drive I am presently using, from a terminal?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Re: D-Ban on usb won't boot

    - Which version of DBAN?
    - What drive are you trying to wipe?
    - How is that drive connected (SATA, USB ...)?



    - I have used dban-2.2.7_i586.iso to wipe hard disk drives, but I would not use it with an SSD.
    .. You may have to treat the iso file with isohybrid and then clone it in order to make a bootable USB drive.
    .. I think that DBAN only works in BIOS mode, so if your computer boots in UEFI mode you must switch boot mode.

    - It is possible to use hdparm, but risky, if you don't know how to use the options correctly.
    .. Warning: Do not attempt to issue a Secure Erase ATA command via hdparm on a device connected through USB.

    - This link may be useful: Securely wipe disk
    Last edited by sudodus; September 13th, 2020 at 08:04 AM. Reason: added details about DBAN

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    21

    Re: D-Ban on usb won't boot

    Thank you Sudodus. I used DD to wipe the drive. How do I know when it is finished wiping if there is only a non accessible screen now. Do I turn the machine off and see what happens? I am not worried about the content that may no longer exist. Even if the drive is ruined, I'm not too worried
    Last edited by Dirk_Ouellette; September 13th, 2020 at 10:25 PM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Re: D-Ban on usb won't boot

    1. Put your dd process to the background with the hotkey combination ctrl z and then the command bg

    2. Then look for the process number and run a very special kill command to make dd output a status report (how much that is written)
    Code:
    ps -A|grep ' dd$'
    kill -s USR1 'the number found by the ps command'
    You can find more details via the command info dd

    Demo example:
    Code:
    sudodus@bionic64 ~ $ dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null
    ^Z
    [1]+  Stoppad                 dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null
    [148] sudodus@bionic64 ~ $ bg
    [1]+ dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null &
    sudodus@bionic64 ~ $ ps -A|grep ' dd$'
     3615 pts/1    00:00:18 dd
    sudodus@bionic64 ~ $ kill -s USR1 3615
    36862722+0 poster in
    36862722+0 poster ut
    18873713664 byte (19 GB, 18 GiB) kopierade, 34,9622 s, 540 MB/s
    sudodus@bionic64 ~ $ kill -s USR1 3615
    42813475+0 poster in
    42813474+0 poster ut
    21920498688 byte (22 GB, 20 GiB) kopierade, 40,1621 s, 546 MB/s
    
    # when overwriting with zeros, you should wait until dd stops with a message that the drive is full, so
    # that it cannot write more to the drive. During this test case I bring the dd process back to the foreground
    # and kill it with ctrl c. You should also be able to stop it by sending a strong kill flag to the process,
    # for example kill -9 (instead of kill -USR1)
    
    sudodus@bionic64 ~ $ fg
    dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/null
    ^C59240419+0 poster in
    59240418+0 poster ut
    30331094016 byte (30 GB, 28 GiB) kopierade, 54,5142 s, 556 MB/s
    
    [130] sudodus@bionic64 ~ $ ps -A|grep ' dd$'
    [1] sudodus@bionic64 ~ $

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