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Thread: Ubuntu trial

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
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    126

    Re: Ubuntu trial

    Quote Originally Posted by aj34 View Post
    Secondly, I can't seem to access my personal files that I know are on the PC's HDD.
    One of the things I love about Linux/Ubuntu is it can read the Windows drive. Windows can't see the Ubuntu partitions, the inverse is not true. Have you ever, in Windows, gone to a directory/folder and clicked an icon with a little arrow and gotten "you do not have permissions?" This is a simple symbolic link, meaning it's a piece of data that takes you to some other directory/folder. I always found it annoying. When you access a Windows directory from Linux, it just follows the link because it's not "aware" of the Windows system permissions.

    When I first started I wanted to be very sure not to nuke my Windows system (in retrospect I laugh at that now.) I bought a new larger drive, put it in as a second disk, then set up Ubuntu on it's own hard disk, leaving the Windows disk intact. You then set up Grub in a dual boot configuration to always boot to Ubuntu first, but can boot back into Windows if you ever need to. It's an approach a lot of people use instead of partitioning the existing drive for both. Do some searches for dual boot ubuntu windows, it's not that difficult.

    Once configured like this, you will find your Windows drive and all files under "other locations" in the file manager.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    A Village in the Jungle
    Beans
    3,267
    Distro
    Ubuntu 20.04 Focal Fossa

    Re: Ubuntu trial

    If you want to see exactly how Ubuntu will act on your computer, Drivers, Updates, Installed Programs, you can do a Full install to USB drive as you would to internal drive, see https://askubuntu.com/questions/1217...e-step-by-step. Installing from image file per sudodus' instructions is the easiest way.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Beans
    4

    Re: Ubuntu trial

    Quote Originally Posted by Dennis N View Post
    Documents and Spreadsheets - LibreOffice is compatible with a wide range of document formats such as Microsoft Word (.doc, .docx), Excel (.xls, .xlsx), PowerPoint (.ppt, .pptx) and Publisher.
    I've used OpenOffice in the distant past and can't remember why I switched back to an old version of Microsoft Word. More recently I had the latest version of Word on my PC that came free (a perk) but I found it kept pestering me to login to my Microsoft account and kept popping up with messages about new features, which I didn't appreciate. Also, I don't find recent Microsoft software intuitive to use or particularly logical. Windows 10 was the final straw (and this will be Microsoft's final OS? What a legacy! No amount of retrospective sticking plasters (updates) will turn this mess into a usable OS for me).

    A few months back, I ditched Word and started using LibreOffice, recommended to me by a friend. I use only WP and spreadsheets and I like it. Ironically, LibreOffice can open an old Microsoft file extension (.wri) perfectly whereas neither the old or new versions of Word could do so without errors.

    "Since you are not using Windows any longer, you will want to re-save your Documents and Spreadsheets in LibreOffice native formats."

    If I saved files in LibreOffice native formats, could I still convert file type and send those documents to other folk in Microsoft native formats?

    I have a second HDD drive fitted in my PC which is not being used now so I could install Ubuntu on that. If I did so, I could set up BIOS to boot from HDD2 (don't know what is meant by 'Grub'?). Just to check my understanding, are you saying that Ubuntu could access my personal folders/files that would still be on HDD1 (along with Windows 10 OS) even though Ubuntu would be installed on HDD2? If so, That would save a lot of folder/file moving from HDD1 to HDD2 and associated ongoing synchronisation issues.

    I'll check out the USB full install instructions although maybe using the (currently unused) second HDD to install Ubuntu might be preferable?

    Thanks again for the useful advice and suggestions. Much appreciated.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    Galiza
    Beans
    2,400
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: Ubuntu trial

    If I saved files in LibreOffice native formats, could I still convert file type and send those documents to other folk in Microsoft native formats?
    Yes! I suggest using the open formats for files intended to be used by you or anyone else with LO or other software supporting it but keep the Microsoft proprietary formats for those who don't. There's no pointy in making two conversions in this case.

    I have a second HDD drive fitted in my PC which is not being used now so I could install Ubuntu on that. If I did so, I could set up BIOS to boot from HDD2 (don't know what is meant by 'Grub'?). Just to check my understanding, are you saying that Ubuntu could access my personal folders/files that would still be on HDD1 (along with Windows 10 OS) even though Ubuntu would be installed on HDD2? If so, That would save a lot of folder/file moving from HDD1 to HDD2 and associated ongoing synchronisation issues.
    This is a very common doubt/misunderstanding.
    Where the system partition(s) reside doesn't matter as long as the system boots. Likewise, where data (personal files) reside doesn't matter as long as you have the correct permissions to open and modify them. Two or more different partitions in the same drive or in different drives doesn't matter.

    Now, for booting a dual-boot, a couple of things do matter. First of all you need to know whether the computer has BIOS (old) or UEFI (new, practically all from the last decade). The BIOS firmware "boots drives", specifically it boots a bootloader in the MBR (Master Boot Record). So, in your scenario because you have two distinct physical disks, you want to keep HDD1 with Windows unchanged and then install Ubuntu in the HDD2 and boot from it. Ubuntu's bootloader is GRUB, it boots Ubuntu and Windows if in dual-boot, something you can't do with Windows because its bootloader only boots other Windows. Many experts often suggest disconnecting the Windows drive while installing and reconnect when done, run a command to redetect OSes and then Windows should be added to the Grub's boot menu allowing the user to choose Ubuntu (default) or Windows. This certainly avoids inadvertently writing to the Windows partitions (or the consequence of making a wrong selection when installing Ubuntu) but isn't necessary. Just change the boot order in BIOS to the HDD2 - this setting will be kept - and the Ubuntu installer will write Grub in that drive only. Changing the boot order back to HDD1 results in booting Windows directly, this being the advantage of having the Windows drive unchanged. Otherwise, if you have only one drive or, with more than one, the boot order wasn't changed / Windows drive disconnected or disabled in BIOS, then the Ubuntu installer will install GRUB in the HDD1 thus replacing the Windows bootloader. This can be a problem later on if Ubuntu becomes corrupt or you decided to delete the Ubuntu system partition because then you'll need to boot from Windows installation media and reinstall the Windows bootloader (the MBR can have only one bootloader).

    With UEFI everything is easier. Any preinstalled Windows 8 or newer is in a UEFI capable computer and in UEFI mode. This firmware boots bootloaders residing in the ESP (EFI System Partition), a small FAT32 partition typically at the beginning of the drive. It's always possible to boot each OS independently. Many experts often recommend duplicating the ESP to the other non-booting drives just in case. It can be a lifesaver when the drive containing the ESP fails or said partition becomes corrupt but isn't necessary. Only one ESP is required regardless of the amount of physical drives or OSes installed, all the bootloaders coexist in the ESP.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    London, England
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Ubuntu trial

    This slide show will show you what screens you will see when installing Ubuntu

    https://ubuntu.com/tutorials/install...top#1-overview

    Regarding the playing of audio and video files you will find that you will need to install some codecs. They are not installed by default because some of them are not open source software and some users do not want non open source software on their computers.

    So, in that slide show look at screen number 5. The third tick box is labelled "Install third party software for graphics and WiFi hardware and additional media formats. If you tick that box you will get a proprietary video driver for your graphic card and several video and audio codecs.

    This will explain why things are not simple in this area of Linux.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ubuntu-restricted-extras

    The Ubuntu live session will not include these closed source, restricted codecs. We can install applications and codecs when using a live session but what is installed is lost when we close the live session.

    Regards
    It is a machine. It is more stupid than we are. It will not stop us from doing stupid things.
    Ubuntu user #33,200. Linux user #530,530


  6. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Pennsylvania, U.S.A.
    Beans
    2,929
    Distro
    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Ubuntu trial

    Quote Originally Posted by Autodave View Post
    Normally, "fast start" is disabled by entering the BIOS. Do you know how to do that? If not, please give us the make and model of you PC.
    "Fast start" in BIOS and "fast start" in Windows are different as I understand it. "Fast start" in BIOS skips all or part of the Power On Self Test (POST), "Fast start" in windows is some sort of hybrid hibernation that Ubuntu sees as a corrupted NTFS file system.

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