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Thread: Returning to dual-booting after a hiatus

  1. #1
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    Returning to dual-booting after a hiatus

    Hi Guys,

    I'll start with an apology for how long this post is going to be, but of course that's just how it is sometimes, eh.

    Having wanted to get a dual-boot system going for many years, I finally made it three and a half years ago. The thread immediately below this paragraph was part of the process. In a nutshell, I couldn't get Windows and Ubuntu to sit together harmoniously on the same disk, and so in the end I followed some clever advice to install grub at the beginning of the second hard disk. And yes, that worked! Eventually, anyway - I had to sweat plenty over it.

    https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2349225

    This is what the two disks look like. The two OSes on sda, all data and other gubbins on sdb, with some partitions at the beginning of sdb which I assume are related to grub, but maybe not all (you tell me please!):

    Screenshot from 2020-06-22 21-41-20.png
    Screenshot from 2020-06-22 21-42-20.png

    Everything was fine until I made the tragic mistake of trying to upgrade Ubuntu from 16 to 18, about a year and half ago. Of course I knew that I was in trouble when the upgrade froze at the point when it was supposed to be updating grub. I couldn't do much else other than restart the computer. Well, I could have taken a picture and written a post here, but that would have all taken too long I suppose. Anyway, I expected the absolute worst, but remarkably I was able to boot into Linux for a little while, after some panicky rescue attempts. Clearly a lot of features had been lost (I can't remember in much detail any more!), and it was not satisfying. And anyway, soon enough grub just failed, and I saw this:

    grub_rescue1.jpg

    I did write a post on here at some point in the month or two after this happened:

    https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2409387

    Initially I got a reply, and a conversation started, but then the communication went dead, despite my shamelessly bumping myself up a few times. I suppose that the person who was replying either got sick or hopelessly busy with other stuff, and eventually I just gave up. I had enough other stuff going on, of course, and anyway, I could get Windows at least, by booting from the disk that both systems are on. Not ideal, obviously, but I survived until now.

    However, I do very much miss having Linux, and of course Windows is super-annoying sometimes (but I don't quite feel ready to let go completely), so I really would like to get Ubuntu back on. Being one of those people placed in a VERY long and strange furlough period, I've decided to devote a couple of weeks of this time to sorting this problem out, and getting back into the Ubuntu spirit.

    The way I see it, I have two options, which I will detail here, and seek advice from the collective:

    ..............

    Option 1

    Try to figure out what's wrong with GRUB, and get the original dual booting back:

    I tried following this post:

    https://unix.stackexchange.com/quest...-mod-not-found

    Of course on that post they talk about normal.mod, Well, I'm apparently missing bufio.mod, and can't find anything online about what the difference is!!!

    I've tried following the instructions as best I could, substituting bufio for normal (which of course I have no idea if it's right or wrong, but not too much to lose, eh). I can find the partition that (I guess) I need to be working on, as it's the only one that responds to 'ls':

    2020-06-23 02.29.19.jpg

    But following instructions from that previous link beyond that doesn't take me very far.

    If it's really beyond salvage, no worries - I'll move on to Option 2 --->

    ...............

    Option 2

    ... is to wipe the old Ubuntu partition and start again, with Ubuntu 20 this time. I've tried it off the USB, and can see some significant improvements, such as immediate detection of mount points, and I'm sure many other things that I don't know about yet. According to all the tutorials that I've found, it's all supposed to be child's play to get the dual boot to work.

    Well, not child's play exactly, but the tutorials say that Windows 10 should be detected by the installation process, but instead of that, I'm getting this:

    Screenshot from 2020-06-24 12-35-11.png

    Is that going to change if I just delete the Ubuntu 18 and Swap partitions? Like I said, I don't really mind too much about losing that corrupted system and starting again.

    The other question relating to that (maybe!) is the Legacy BIOS - UEFI issue. I don't really understand how this affects dual booting, and haven't found the information to explain that properly. I've taken screenshots of my settings from the boot manager, and I'll just stick them on here to see if there's one magic bullet!

    Ah, I see that I'm limited to five pictures per post, so I'll have to put a second post with those. Sorry!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    Returning to dual-booting after a hiatus

    Here are the boot settings. Hopefully this is the right info anyway. Main setting here:

    2020-06-23 02.12.00.jpg

    Plus some other stuff:

    2020-06-23 02.12.22.jpg2020-06-23 02.12.35.jpg2020-06-23 02.12.50.jpg2020-06-23 02.13.02.jpg

    OK, that'll do for now. Sorry if there's anything missing

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Ubuntu

    Re: Returning to dual-booting after a hiatus

    Did you go back and look at previous suggestions in your old thread, including those by me?
    I still suggest running Boot-Repair first. But do not run any autofix as Boot-Repair will want to install grub to all drives, and since you have more than one, better to have Windows boot in one & Ubuntu/grub boot in other.

    Lets see details, use ppa version with your live installer (2nd option) or any working install, not older Boot-Repair ISO:
    Please copy & paste the pastebin link to the Boot-info summary report ( do not post report), do not run the auto fix till reviewed.
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Boot-Repair

    But you have complicated it by having a newer UEFI system, but Windows installed in the now 35 year old BIOS/MBR mode. Windows requires MBR partitioning for BIOS boot and gpt partitioning for UEFI boot.
    And your sdb drive is over 2TiB and requires gpt partitioning as MBR designed 35 years ago has a hard limit of 2TB since even GB was not even a consideration back in early 1980's.

    Also Microsoft has required vendors to only install Windows in UEFI boot mode to gpt partitioned drives since Windows 8 released in 2012.
    But difficult to dual boot unless both systems are in same boot mode, so since Windows is BIOS, you have to use BIOS to boot Ubuntu.

    Any consideration to full backup of Windows and total reinstall in UEFI boot mode?
    If not, then set UEFI to only boot in Legacy boot mode. That setting is only for your installed systems and you have to only select to boot USB flash drives in Legacy/BIOS/CSM boot mode. You may have to turn on allow USB boot or full USB support.
    CSM - UEFI Compatibility Support Module (CSM), which emulates a BIOS mode, only available with secure boot off.
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

  4. #4
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    Re: Returning to dual-booting after a hiatus

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    Any consideration to full backup of Windows and total reinstall in UEFI boot mode?
    This would be my recommendation. Install Windows (if you want it) in UEFI with GPT partitioning and then install (K)Ubuntu 20.04. Anything else just makes things harder for negative benefit.

    Also, be aware that Windows by default (and after updates even if you turn it off) hibernates instead of shutting down properly, which means all of its partitions are dirty and won't be shown. They call it Fast Startup. You'll need to turn that off when you want the installer to know about your Windows partitions.
    Last edited by CatKiller; 2 Weeks Ago at 07:32 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Re: Returning to dual-booting after a hiatus

    Hey Guys!

    Thank you so much for the super-quick replies, as usual

    I'll have a proper look at all that, and report back soon!

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