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Thread: Cant create new folder in different drive

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Cant create new folder in different drive

    I'm VERY new to Linux, just entering at least an hour ago, and i know nothing of Ubuntu, but i navigated to my other drive that i wanted to make a new folder on, and it was grayed out. I tried other solutions but it didn't make much sense. Can someone help me on this?

  2. #2
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    Re: Cant create new folder in different drive

    Can you tell more about this drive? Is it an extern drive? Another partition? Is it in your root directory?
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  3. #3
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    Re: Cant create new folder in different drive

    What file system is it? NTFS? Ext4?

  4. #4
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    Re: Cant create new folder in different drive

    All Linux distributions were designed as multi-user systems and a 'normal' user will by default, be allowed read/write access only to the /home/user directory. If you wand access to other parts of the system, you need to either do it as root (using sudo) or change ownership permissions. Read through the Ubuntu documentation at the links below to get a more thorough understanding. The 3rd link below gives a detailed explanation of using sudo.

    https://help.ubuntu.com/

    https://help.ubuntu.com/stable/ubuntu-help/

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo

  5. #5
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    Re: Cant create new folder in different drive

    Quote Originally Posted by pigswipe View Post
    I'm VERY new to Linux, just entering at least an hour ago, and i know nothing of Ubuntu, but i navigated to my other drive that i wanted to make a new folder on, and it was grayed out. I tried other solutions but it didn't make much sense. Can someone help me on this?
    First, which release of Ubuntu are you running? 20.04, 18.04, something else? The version matters.

    Second, which DE/flavor of Ubuntu are you running? Gnome3, Mate, KDE, XFCE, LXQT or something else? This matters so we can understand which programs are on the system, by default. Different flavors install different file managers, for example.

    Like many OSes, Ubuntu has been adding more and more default security over time. Most Unix security revolves around file and directory security. From the ground up, all Unix-like OSes, including all Ubuntus, are multi-user. This means that by default, an administrator must setup access to new storage and pro-actively decide which users may have access.

    People new to Unix-like systems probably don't think much about file systems. They've never needed to, but in the Unix world, there are probably 50 different file systems, each with specific strengths.
    MS-Windows effectively has 3 file systems: NTFS, FAT32, exFAT.
    Most HDDs we buy will come formatted with 1 partition as NTFS.

    Unix can access NTFS, but it is NOT the preferred file system for a number of reasons. Mainly because it doesn't support normal Unix file and directory permissions without using complex ACLs. Most of the time, this means that only one userid can access the NTFS file system at a time because permissions can only be controlled at mount time.

    In the last year of so, Canonical has decided to force a new, constrained, software package system onto everyone. These are called "snap packages". If you use the GUI to install software, it is hard to know which type of packaging is being used. Normally, that wouldn't matter, except that snap packages only allow users to access and create files under that user's HOME directory. Extra storage added to a system wouldn't normally be available from a HOME directory. There are ways around that, but most of those methods are beyond what a beginner can handle without some Unix chops.
    To see which packages are installed as snaps, use:
    Code:
    snap list
    The first thing I would do is to change the file system from NTFS to ext4 if the storage will only be used on Linux systems. Typically, Windows cannot access ext4 file systems directly. For me, I don't care about Windows. If Windows needs access to storage, I'd setup a network method where the ext4 file system doesn't matter. With ext4, we get access to users, groups, and complete control over different permissions throughout the file system. NTFS permissions are set for all files and all directories through the mount options. It should be avoided, unless you must, must, must, be able to connect the HDD directly to a Windows computer. Over the network access is completely different and does not need NTFS. Actually, NTFS makes over the network access a little harder.

    Anyway, post the answers to the questions asked above and we'll go from there.

    Some light reading:

    Using ext4 makes the mount stuff easier AND provides faster throughput than NTFS too. File systems make a difference about performance and ease of use.

    If you want a more complete knowledge, provided in a better order, with deeper understanding, http://linuxcommand.org/tlcl.php

    If you just want to point-n-click to get it mounted and are willing to fight with it due to NTFS, someone where should be able to help.

  6. #6
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    Re: Cant create new folder in different drive

    Quote Originally Posted by Artificial Intelligence View Post
    Can you tell more about this drive? Is it an extern drive? Another partition? Is it in your root directory?
    Its an external drive.
    Quote Originally Posted by ActionParsnip View Post
    What file system is it? NTFS? Ext4?
    When i open the properties file, it says the filesystem type is fuse. Is that what im looking for or am i looking in the wrong place?
    Quote Originally Posted by yancek View Post
    All Linux distributions were designed as multi-user systems and a 'normal' user will by default, be allowed read/write access only to the /home/user directory. If you wand access to other parts of the system, you need to either do it as root (using sudo) or change ownership permissions. Read through the Ubuntu documentation at the links below to get a more thorough understanding. The 3rd link below gives a detailed explanation of using sudo.

    https://help.ubuntu.com/

    https://help.ubuntu.com/stable/ubuntu-help/

    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RootSudo
    When i go to the properties tab and click permissions, everything is set to create and delete files.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFu View Post
    First, which release of Ubuntu are you running? 20.04, 18.04, something else? The version matters.

    Second, which DE/flavor of Ubuntu are you running? Gnome3, Mate, KDE, XFCE, LXQT or something else? This matters so we can understand which programs are on the system, by default. Different flavors install different file managers, for example.

    Like many OSes, Ubuntu has been adding more and more default security over time. Most Unix security revolves around file and directory security. From the ground up, all Unix-like OSes, including all Ubuntus, are multi-user. This means that by default, an administrator must setup access to new storage and pro-actively decide which users may have access.

    People new to Unix-like systems probably don't think much about file systems. They've never needed to, but in the Unix world, there are probably 50 different file systems, each with specific strengths.
    MS-Windows effectively has 3 file systems: NTFS, FAT32, exFAT.
    Most HDDs we buy will come formatted with 1 partition as NTFS.

    Unix can access NTFS, but it is NOT the preferred file system for a number of reasons. Mainly because it doesn't support normal Unix file and directory permissions without using complex ACLs. Most of the time, this means that only one userid can access the NTFS file system at a time because permissions can only be controlled at mount time.

    In the last year of so, Canonical has decided to force a new, constrained, software package system onto everyone. These are called "snap packages". If you use the GUI to install software, it is hard to know which type of packaging is being used. Normally, that wouldn't matter, except that snap packages only allow users to access and create files under that user's HOME directory. Extra storage added to a system wouldn't normally be available from a HOME directory. There are ways around that, but most of those methods are beyond what a beginner can handle without some Unix chops.
    To see which packages are installed as snaps, use:
    Code:
    snap list
    The first thing I would do is to change the file system from NTFS to ext4 if the storage will only be used on Linux systems. Typically, Windows cannot access ext4 file systems directly. For me, I don't care about Windows. If Windows needs access to storage, I'd setup a network method where the ext4 file system doesn't matter. With ext4, we get access to users, groups, and complete control over different permissions throughout the file system. NTFS permissions are set for all files and all directories through the mount options. It should be avoided, unless you must, must, must, be able to connect the HDD directly to a Windows computer. Over the network access is completely different and does not need NTFS. Actually, NTFS makes over the network access a little harder.

    Anyway, post the answers to the questions asked above and we'll go from there.

    Some light reading:

    Using ext4 makes the mount stuff easier AND provides faster throughput than NTFS too. File systems make a difference about performance and ease of use.

    If you want a more complete knowledge, provided in a better order, with deeper understanding, http://linuxcommand.org/tlcl.php

    If you just want to point-n-click to get it mounted and are willing to fight with it due to NTFS, someone where should be able to help.
    I think I'm running 20.04, since i just installed it yesterday. I have no clue what version it is, i just downloaded it off the main website. How would i go about changing the file system? If it changes anything, i selected to install the minimum package.

  7. #7
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    Re: Cant create new folder in different drive

    FUSE - means it isn't ext4. It is almost certainly NTFS. Also, "external" could mean USB, eSATA, Infiniband. eSATA or Infiniband would be better than USB3.

    Anyway, I'd use the gparted tool to check out the storage and reformat as needed. There might be other ways.
    sudo -H gparted is the exact command I'd use in a terminal. Then I'd be extremely careful to select the correct drive, then correct partition, then right-click and choose ext4 to format, say "apply" and let that run for 20-90 seconds.Then close that application. Note the exact device you formatted - probably something like sdc1 or sdd1. You need that for the next step.

    The device name may not be either of those examples. And at every boot, the device name can change so we need to use something that doesn't change with every reboot. The UUID is normally used, so we'll use that.

    To add the mount information to the fstab configuration file, we need 2 new pieces of information.
    * the UUID - a unique identifier that doesn't change between boots
    * the location we want the new file system mounted. That location is just an empty directory, somewhere, anywhere, but there are some smarter places to put it to make life easier today and later.

    UUID:
    We need to get the UUIDs for all the partitions on the system - sudo blkid will provide that. Look for the UUID that relates to the device (sdc1 or sdd1). If you don't see the device from above in the list, then unplug the USB connection and reconnect it. Wait 10 seconds, then run sudo blkid again. The highest letter in the device name sd[a-z]1 should be the newly connected disk that has the partition and ext4 file system. If you aren't 100% certain, stop and ask for help.

    Assuming you got the correct UUID now, Using copy/paste or select/paste is the easy way with the UUID.

    What will this storage hold? Movies, TV, Music, videos, files, something else? Might you add another disk in 3 yrs? If so, best to start thinking about that today and plan for it.

    For reasons that I won't get into, the mount point should proabably go under /media/files1 or something like that. /media already exists. sudo mkdir -p /media/files1 will make a directory for the mount.

    Now, we just need to put all this information in the fstab file. Run this command: sudoedit /etc/fstab
    at the bottom of the file, add a new line with this:
    Code:
    UUID=2471d686-fde5-4680-a75a-xxyyzz11223344   /media/files1 ext4  auto,user,async,nofail 0 1
    Replace the the example UUID above with the actual one from your blkid output. That line must be 1 line, not 2 lines. Spacing is only allowed between the places shown. 1 or 50 spaces doesn't matter. At least 1 is needed. The auto....nofail parts must not, cannot, have any spaces. That part of the options have to be handed over to the mount command unmolested - no spaces allowed.

    sudoedit is the safest way to edit almost all system files with just 2 exceptions that you will probably never need to touch. Use sudoedit over other options you see.

    We're almost done. 2 more steps.

    Mount the storage: sudo mount -a
    Check that the storage was mounted using the df -Th command. Do you see it? If not, we need to figure out why not.

    And the last step is to set the owner, group and permissions to whatever you want for the mount point to allow the access by all the users you need to have access. Probably, the 2 commands you need are:
    Code:
    sudo chown $USER:$USER /media/files1
    and
    Code:
    chmod 775 /media/files1
    The 2nd command doesn't need sudo. So, you don't need to do anything going forward from here. At boot, it will be mounted to /media/files1 automatically for your use. The permissions will work to allow your userid full access and others read-only access. If you need something different, there are changes that can be made, but you'll want to learn about file and directory permissions to accomplish that.

    One final statement - never set permissions to 777. Never. That is terrible for security.

  8. #8
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    Re: Cant create new folder in different drive

    If it is NTFS, you have to make sure Windows fast start up did not set the hibernation bit.
    If that is set Ubuntu's NTFS driver will not normally mount it. It can be mounted read only.
    That is to prevent damage to the hibernated file system.

    Fast Start up off (always on hibernation), note that Windows turns this back on with updates, SHIFT + Shut down button
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.p...2#post13488472
    http://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/4...dows-10-a.html
    http://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/2...dows-10-a.html
    https://www.windowscentral.com/how-d...0-fast-startup
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

  9. #9
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    Re: Cant create new folder in different drive

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFu View Post
    "external" could mean USB, eSATA, Infiniband. eSATA or Infiniband would be better than USB3
    Oh, i think i mistyped that, oops. I dont know much about hardware stuff, but its a drive inside the computer, not external.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheFu View Post
    Anyway, I'd use the gparted tool to check out the storage and reformat as needed.
    Would reformatting remove everything on the drive?

    sorry for the abundance of questions and my brain not being great at processing things

  10. #10
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    Re: Cant create new folder in different drive

    Would reformatting remove everything on the drive?
    Yes, definitely.

    Again, if it's a NTFS formatted partition we're talking about, and if said drive has been used by Windows (with Fast Startup eneabled, the default state, by the way), regardless of you having or not Windows at the moment, that drive is now "read-only". You can backup all its contents to somewhere else and then reformat it if you want. Otherwise you need to mount it in Windows and then disable Fast Startup and then shutdown.

    Also of note is that unless you absolutely need that partition to be shared between Linux and Windows, there's no point in keeping it as NTFS. Linux distros don't have the proper tools for correcting that file system if problems arise (and they will). If using only with Linux then EXT4 is arguably the best choice.

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