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Thread: snap-confine has elevated permissions and is not confined but should be. Refusing to

  1. #1
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    snap-confine has elevated permissions and is not confined but should be. Refusing to

    I am running the latest version (19.10) of Ubuntu of a live USB stick with persistence which I plan to use as a casual development system.

    I tried installing eclipse with snap which didn't work so install Microsoft code from the app store

    But...when I try to launch it I get

    snap-confine has elevated permissions and is not confined but should be. Refusing to continue to avoid permission escalation attacks

    The solutions offered by google haven't done the trick. Whats the proper answer? I don't want to wipe the stick and start afresh, but it is an option
    Last edited by back-ache; March 10th, 2020 at 12:10 PM.

  2. #2
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    Xubuntu 19.10 Eoan Ermine

    Re: snap-confine has elevated permissions and is not confined but should be. Refusing

    "Latest version" isn't very clear. Do you mean the latest LTS version (18.04), the latest released version (19.10) or the current development version (20.04)?

    Anyway, if it's a live usb, it's not a full system. You can have a live usb with persistence (you didn't specify), on which you can install some things and keep them after a reboot, but it's a bit limited. I expect that's the cause of your problem. Note that I never use snap packages or anything Microsoft and that I only use live usbs to install or fix Ubuntu.

  3. #3
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    Re: snap-confine has elevated permissions and is not confined but should be. Refusing

    I hoped that wasn't the case, I want to keep my work (on Windows) and play (open source contributions) separate

    Currently I am using a USB3 stick and Ubuntu 19.10 (AMD64)

    The performance is great though the Sandisk gets almost to hot to touch
    Last edited by back-ache; March 10th, 2020 at 12:24 PM.

  4. #4
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    Re: snap-confine has elevated permissions and is not confined but should be. Refusing

    Anyway, if it's a live usb, it's not a full system. You can have a live usb with persistence (you didn't specify), on which you can install some things and keep them after a reboot, but it's a bit limited. I expect that's the cause of your problem. Note that I never use snap packages or anything Microsoft and that I only use live usbs to install or fix Ubuntu.
    Same for me.

    I do use virtual machines, extensively, and have since around 2006. VMs today are more than good for almost any sort of development, except Java or FPS games. Heck, I do webapp development on a chromebook with 4G of RAM and 20G storage for the webapp server stuff. My development runs inside a KVM VM on the chromebook.

    USB will always be slower and have queuing issues for storage access. The USB storage protocol just isn't made to host a complete, multi-threaded, multi-tasking OS where 20 different processes all need to access USB storage areas. USB storage is fine for emergencies and for uses where just a few processes will need access - like backups or media streaming, but not for an OS daily use. For that, we need the SATA command set - like eSATA. IMHO.

    Or just use a VM.

    If you plan to do Java development, get the fastest Core i7 or Ryzen 9xxx and 64GB of RAM, 2x NVMe SSD storage and hope that's fast enough. Java is a dog/slow/hungry for CPU and RAM. For Python, C, Perl, Ruby, Rust, Go, development, pretty much any chromebook or better system can be used.

    I've tried to use snaps a few times. They always fail. Seems the snap dev team doesn't think anyone should use storage that isn't in their HOME directory. This design failure has forced me to use AppImages, which are slow, clunky too. Played with flatpaks, they didn't work. Seems some dependencies weren't included by the package teams - which sorta defeats the reason for using flatpaks, right?
    Last edited by TheFu; March 10th, 2020 at 02:07 PM.

  5. #5
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    Re: snap-confine has elevated permissions and is not confined but should be. Refusing

    I do want to stick with USB, maybe I could boot to a baremetal VM host and then to a VM (though that one on my opensource project then require a vm for its container maybe an issue)

    The languages I plan on using are just python and javascript and for database postgres and mongo

    oh why does life have to be so complicated

  6. #6
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    Ubuntu

    Re: snap-confine has elevated permissions and is not confined but should be. Refusing

    You can have a full install in an USB drive. Not the same thing as a live version with or without persistence and, of course, much less "portable". Live media is not to be used as a daily driver.

  7. #7
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    Re: snap-confine has elevated permissions and is not confined but should be. Refusing

    Quote Originally Posted by back-ache View Post
    oh why does life have to be so complicated
    The answer to that question always seems to be MS-Windows.

    VMs actually make life much easier. We can try out almost any OS inside a VM with effectively zero risk to the hostOS, especially if we don't perform risky online behaviors and use NAT networking from the VM. I've found the flexibility provided by virtualization to be so great that my daily use desktop is actually a VM since around 2010. I don't have any monster computers with $1000 CPUs and 32GB or RAM either. I ran 15 VMs on a Core2 Duo from 2008 and 16GB of RAM for almost a decade. Then I moved some to a Core i5-750 (1st gen i5). None of my systems, even today, have more than 16GB of RAM. Linux just doesn't waste RAM like Windows does.

    Here's the free RAM, buffers, swap on a web-app server running nextcloud, wallabag, and ZNC:
    Code:
    $ free -h
                  total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
    Mem:           992M        299M        350M         45M        342M        455M
    Swap:          1.0G        162M        859M
    300MB of RAM used for all those webapps.

    Here's my VPN server:
    Code:
    $ free -h
                  total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
    Mem:           992M         56M        270M         10M        664M        742M
    Swap:          1.0G          0B        1.0G
    Under 60MB of RAM used. This is an Ubuntu 16.04 server, BTW. Fully patched.
    Linux servers are highly efficient. It will take some time to get over that warped MSFT-thinking bias.

    However, that isn't to say that all Ubuntu Servers are this efficient:
    Code:
    $ free 
                 total       used       free     shared    buffers     cached
    Mem:       1220136     971808     248328          0     183460     342688
    -/+ buffers/cache:     445660     774476
    Swap:            0          0          0
    That's a Ruby on Rails webapp server using almost 1GB of RAM. It is a hog.

    USB for an OS really should be avoided. Go ahead and run that way for a few months, you'll see. The portability you seem to want just doesn't really work out for non-trivial setups.

    The required storage for a Linux VM isn't like MS-Windows either. My VMs use direct LVM allocations. Each of these below are allocations for a single VM, each:
    Code:
    NAME                                SIZE TYPE FSTYPE      MOUNTPOINT
    │ ├─hadar--vg-lv--srv--1910          10G lvm              
    │ ├─hadar--vg-lv--zcs45--1604        25G lvm              
    │ ├─hadar--vg-lv--blog44--1604     16.2G lvm              
    │ ├─hadar--vg-lv--vpn09--1604       7.5G lvm              
    │ ├─hadar--vg-lv--spam3              10G lvm              
    │ ├─hadar--vg-test--1804             10G lvm              
    │ ├─hadar--vg-lv--lubuntu11--1604    31G lvm              
    │ ├─hadar--vg-lv--xen41--1604      12.5G lvm
    I give servers the storage they need. 10G is about the lower end size. Adding more storage is really easy thanks to LVM. Right-sized storage ripples throughout our infrastructure. It impacts backup storage, backup timeframes, disaster recovery, off-site backups. Basically, having the correct amount, and no more, is important.

    Anyways, VMs are central to every programmer, IT person, and enterprise since around 2005. Not knowing and being comfortable with VMs isn't a good idea these days.

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