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Thread: step zero

  1. #21
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    Re: step zero

    Quote Originally Posted by seeker17 View Post
    Yes, Impavidus, I could use the installer to wipe Windows 7 and install Ubuntu, but I like to do things in small steps.
    Just wiping Windows 7 and installing Ubuntu is easier than installing Ubuntu as dual boot. The small steps you want to take are larger than the steps I suggested. Note that this is only true because you already have a new computer with Windows 10. Dumping Windows altogether when first installing a Linux distribution is generally a bad idea.

    Quote Originally Posted by seeker17 View Post
    2. I clicked "send to" on the file and sent it to my thumb drive.
    As told to you by others, that won't work. To give you a slightly simplified version of the technical details: to be able to boot from a usb drive or a dvd, you need a specific piece of software, called a bootloader, in a specific place on the usb drive/dvd. This bootloader is present in the .iso file, but if you simply copy the .iso file somewhere into the filesystem of the usb drive, it won't end up in the right place. So you have to "burn" it to the usb or burn it "as an image" to the dvd. This replaces the entire filesystem of the usb drive with the filesystem present in the .iso file, which will put the bootloader in the right spot, making the usb bootable. Same on a dvd: instead of creating a new filesystem containing an .iso file, you have to use the .iso file itself as the filesystem of the dvd.
    1. Do I have to erase everything else that was on the thumb drive?
    By replacing the filesystem on the usb drive, everything that was there will be erased automatically.

  2. #22
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    Mar 2020
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    8

    Re: step zero

    I am very excited.

    I followed the Nero instructions that yancek was kind enough to provide. I was able to correctly burn an iso (no, I don't fully understand what an iso is, but the job is done!).

    I rebooted, pressed F12 and the DVD installed Ubuntu on its own partition. The program updated and here I am.

    I will look around this new (to me) OS, next time I a have a free moment.

    I am sure I will have plenty to ask.

    Perhaps I can now change the title of this thread to "Step One"!

    Thank you everyone. And thank you Impavidus for that explanation about iso files. I think I am beginning to understand.

    I'll be back.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
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    Kubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    Re: step zero

    Glad to hear you're up and running now.

    Quote Originally Posted by seeker17 View Post
    (no, I don't fully understand what an iso is, but the job is done!).
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_image
    None but ourselves can free our minds

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Promiseland
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    Xubuntu

    Re: step zero

    How does one get a computer with only Ubuntu on it? Does one have to buy it like that?
    Yes, you can buy a computer with Ubuntu installed - https://system76.com/
    You can buy one without any operating system installed - search for 'refurbished without OS'.
    You can replace your current HDD/SSD with a new one without OS - they are pretty cheap now.
    You can build one from parts - pcpartpicker.com

    Have fun.
    Cheers,


    The Linux Command Line at http://linuxcommand.org/

  5. #25
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    Mar 2020
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    8

    Re: step zero

    Back with some questions. Excited to have this working. I can really only get on non-work-related projects one day a week so here I am for this week.

    I have installed one or two things from the Ubuntu Software - icon on left side of screen.

    I am playing around with Office Libre; I can see there's a lot to learn here.

    Some basic Step One questions:
    1. does an antivirus install with Ubuntu or do I have to download one?
    2. is the name of my wireless network visible - a security/privacy question
    3. does an equivalent of Windows Notepad install with Ubuntu? I am looking for something very simple that I can open quickly with a right-click on the desktop.

    Thanking everyone again.

    Seeker17

  6. #26
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    Re: step zero

    1: There's no antivirus coming with Ubuntu and you don't really have to install one. Viruses aren't really a problem on Linux. That doesn't mean you shouldn't worry about malware at all on Ubuntu, but virus scanners are mostly used on email servers.

    2: I assume that would depend on the settings of your wireless router. Some people hide their network. I read that it's less of a security and privacy benefit than you'd expect on first sight.

    3: There are many text editors around and some of them will be installed by default: gedit, emacs, nano, mousepad, vim, kate, pluma, nedit, ne, e3, dav, gprompter, yudit, joe, jove, levee, vile, vis, ed. Search the package manager. I think most use gedit. I always use vim.

  7. #27
    Join Date
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    Ubuntu Mate 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: step zero

    Seems you might be making the mistakes that people coming fro other OSes commonly make when they get to Linux/Ubuntu. That mistake is thinking that what they've learned or been taught is relevant anymore. Linux/Ubuntu is a completely different OS. It isn't like OSX or Windows. Programs for it aren't created with the same overall philosophy as they are for those other systems, so many assumptions you bring with you aren't good to have. They are a hindrance.

    For a quick overview about major differences, read this: https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...ows-users.html Sure, it is from 2014, but it is still relevant.

    Onto the questions:
    1) Best to read the "Sticky Threads" at the top of the Ubuntu Forums Security sub-forum. https://ubuntuforums.org/forumdisplay.php?f=338 Usually, we don't run AV software on our desktops. The architecture of Linux means there isn't much need for it, since normal users can't really harm the system. Gaining access to the admin user(s) takes a specific request that isn't accidental.

    2) Wireless network connections (wifi, bluetooth, cellular data) are all non-secure. Nothing you or I can do about that. Whether that is a risk sufficient for you to modify behavior is a different question. If you live 10 miles into the woods with no neighbors for 20 miles, perhaps worrying about wifi isn't all that important. OTOH, if you live in a densely packed dorm or apartment complex, perhaps using a VPN with your wifi, always, would be smart? The answer about bluetooth stuff is really easy. Don't use bluetooth if you don't want to be hacked. I'm 100% serious. Hacking bluetooth isn't even a challenge. As for wireless data from your cellular phone company, those guys have a trade-off to make and they routinely trade security for battery life every time.

    3) Editors. In any Unix-like OS, which included Ubuntu systems, having a text editor is much more important than for Windows. I use a text editor probably 40+ times every day. Initially, most people start with nano or whatever the built-in editor (in their menus) might be. Over time, as they want more power, they will seek out editors more like notepad++. Then finally, they'll outgrow those and learn vim. I've been a programmer, systems admin for almost 30 yrs and I started out using the simple editors of the time just like everyone else whenever I could. vim didn't exist back then. We had vi and it was installed on every system, including routers. I've never seen any other editor installed on routers. vi and vim are closely related and the basics are the same. Someone unfamiliar with vi/vim will eventually need to learn it just a little, if only enough to learn how to exit the program.

    Editor choice is a holy war for Unix people. Use whatever you like. Expect someone to suggest a different editor. Some people might harass you based on the editor - sorta like how Ford people hassle Chevy drivers. Any program we use a bunch becomes important to us and that shows in stupid arguments. Use whatever editor you like.

    There are many Beginner steps for Ubuntu websites out there. Just depends on why you use Ubuntu what you might want/need to learn first. A casual user, surfing, music, videos, a few native games would learn stuff completely different from what someone who wants to be a Linux Admin, get a job, would need to learn. Same for someone trying to learn to program for servers - completely different skills than those other two types of people are needed.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
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    8

    Re: step zero

    Thank you impavidus and TheFu. I will go to the two areas mentioned in your post, TheFu.
    I will accept that I do not need an AV while I read why.
    Regarding the wifi security, it seems just another reason for me to get a VPN, which I plan to do soon. Of course "soon" for me is a relative statement.
    Text editors: where is the "package manager" you refer to, impavidus. That's me speaking from ignorance again.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    Ubuntu Mate 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: step zero

    https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/...ows-users.html is the first link to be read. Please. it explains package managers among other very basic things.

    While you can use a paid VPN, that won't help secure your local wifi access. You need to run your own VPN server on the LAN for that and only use wired connections whenever possible.

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