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Thread: GUI backup software that allows restoration of specific user specified files

  1. #11
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    Re: GUI backup software that allows restoration of specific user specified files

    Quote Originally Posted by bingbong6 View Post
    Thanks! I will consider this. Agreed, I need to learn to use the cli for more things, but I'm still learning and have to prioritize. Right now, so I have SOME backups, I'm probably going to stick with a GUI because it's faster for me at this point in time. Also, and most importantly, I recently learned a lesson regarding permissions and proper security of executable scripts. The lesson I learned was that I'm not educated on it. So I need to get more familiar with basic security practices and permissions, and then maybe I'll try incorporating more custom scripts into my machine.

    I appreciate you sharing that though, I'm definitely saving it for future use/reference.
    CLI/Shell is better than a GUI for a few things.
    * automation
    * backups
    * moving files, data, around
    * renaming lots and lots of files
    * system admin work, configurations.

    Since backups generally should be 100% automatic, daily, overnight, the first time most people need to learn a little scripting is when they try to create backups.

    As for the best tool for backups, it really comes down to the tool that works for your restore needs. Try about 5 different tools out. Backup /etc/ as your test area. This specific area is good for testing backups because there are system files, owned by different users, with a few different groups and special files which can break some backup tools in that directory area. /etc/ is also relatively tiny, so that doing the backup should be just a few seconds total. Then restore the files somewhere else and verify they are all exactly the same. Same data, same owner, group, permissions, ACLs. All those things must be the same.
    When you test, be certain to change the permissions (in a harmless way) of some files for at least 1 version of the backups. Modify some files enough to change them, but not break anything - add an extra line to the bottom of /etc/hosts ... you get the idea. Create at least 3 different versions of the backup-set of files. How much added storage does each "version" require? This 2nd set of tests is where many rsync solutions fail.

    IMHO.

  2. #12
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    Re: GUI backup software that allows restoration of specific user specified files

    I'll definitely give this a shot. Probably going to test it on my raspberry pi though in case I botch something again....like deleting my /bin lol (by the way, Timeshift successfully restored my root partition, and my home partition which I didn't want to do, which is what prompted this post).

    This 2nd set of tests is where many rsync solutions fail.
    Which tests? Everything here?:

    When you test, be certain to change the permissions (in a harmless way) of some files for at least 1 version of the backups. Modify some files enough to change them, but not break anything - add an extra line to the bottom of /etc/hosts ... you get the idea. Create at least 3 different versions of the backup-set of files. How much added storage does each "version" require?

  3. #13
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    Re: GUI backup software that allows restoration of specific user specified files

    Vms are good for this sort of thing. Snapshot and just restore if you botch it.

  4. #14
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    Re: GUI backup software that allows restoration of specific user specified files

    I ways worry with VMs that I will still somehow manage to somehow mess up my bare metal system

  5. #15
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    Re: GUI backup software that allows restoration of specific user specified files

    Quote Originally Posted by bingbong6 View Post
    I ways worry with VMs that I will still somehow manage to somehow mess up my bare metal system
    That is next to impossible, unlike attempting to dual boot, which is 1000x more dangerous than using a hypervisor and VMs. VMs running inside the virtual hardware setup for them. They cannot* break out of that and touch the hostOS unless you go out of your way to allow it.

    * cannot is a strong term. There have been attacks against hypervisors which use flaws to break out of the VM. These are deliberate attacks, not accidental. I've read about them, never saw any in the wild. Patches usually fix the issue before it is announced, at least for the hypervisor I use, qemu-kvm.
    Last edited by TheFu; 4 Weeks Ago at 02:57 PM.

  6. #16
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    Re: GUI backup software that allows restoration of specific user specified files

    Timeshift or fsarchiver for your root partition. Backintime or Areca for your home partition.

  7. #17
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    Re: GUI backup software that allows restoration of specific user specified files

    I have been using grsync for years and never an issue. It is really fast. I backup around 300GB in a few minutes (after first run of course). You can save permissions and many other options. I backup home and another backup of / excluding some folders like opt, mnt, etc

  8. #18
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    Re: GUI backup software that allows restoration of specific user specified files

    Another vote for grsync. By setting up different backup profiles, and with careful use of exclusion files, you can control things to a fare-thee-well. E.g., I have a grsync profile for my config, separate from my data. This is very useful if you enjoy, as I do, exploring different distros.

    As someone mentioned above, do note the difference between somedirectory and somedirectory/ in specifying your backups. A small amount of experimentation will make it clear.

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