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Thread: How to resize Ubuntu 18.04 Partition on Dual Boot Windows 10

  1. #11
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    Re: How to resize Ubuntu 18.04 Partition on Dual Boot Windows 10

    Had I not just attempted this 2 weeks ago, I'd have a different stance. Perhaps it is a newer capability that doesn't work on my LTS releases? I ended up repartitioning the disk to the way I wanted and restoring from backups, which took about 26 hrs for that amount of data.

  2. #12
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    Ubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo

    Re: How to resize Ubuntu 18.04 Partition on Dual Boot Windows 10

    I don't agree on using Windows to shrink its own partition.
    It is worth trying but as the partition is mounted sometimes it doesn't work
    or only allows to free a few MB when there is a lot of unused space.
    In such cases Gparted on a live USB disk worked for me but it warned me it could be unsafe and it took a lot of time.
    May be a Windows defragmentation could have helped but it seems gparted is clever enough to do it.
    A good idea is also to use the Windows function to free disk space before using gparted.
    Having big boot partitions is not a good idea for any OS for backup reasons.
    Linux with mount-points and symbolic links is very flexible on that point.
    Happy user of Ubuntu-19.04 on a Beelink BT3pro mini PC

  3. #13
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    Re: How to resize Ubuntu 18.04 Partition on Dual Boot Windows 10

    I had good luck using AOMEI, (free), to partition a Windows drive when Windows couldn't handle it.
    I have had problems in the past using GParted on a Windows drive. Besides it can take a long time.

  4. #14
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    Re: How to resize Ubuntu 18.04 Partition on Dual Boot Windows 10

    While I normally recommend Windows tools for Windows, its partitioning with BIOS/MBR and Linux logical partitions has a bug going back to Windows 7 but still present with Windows 10 when BIOS/MBR.
    It conveniently "forgets" to include the Linux logical partitions when it rewrites the partition table. Data is still there, but partition table entry is missing.
    Recently someone using AOMEI has same issue.

    Issue with Windows is that is needs defrag & turning off fixed files like the hibernation file first or MFT master file table. Many have used gparted, but those that have had issues then blame Linux. Probably would have had issues with Windows as some partition issue, but that is why we normally suggest using Windows tools to shrink NTFS partitions. And gparted for just about everything else.

    One of many where Linux partition disappeared.
    Windows 7 to Windows 10 MBR partition missing
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2288988 &
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

  5. #15
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    Re: How to resize Ubuntu 18.04 Partition on Dual Boot Windows 10

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    ... Many have used gparted, but those that have had issues then blame Linux. Probably would have had issues with Windows as some partition issue, but that is why we normally suggest using Windows tools to shrink NTFS partitions.
    Exactly this.

    Send people to Windows to do Windows things, then when that fails, they come back, understand it is non-trivial, can cause total data loss, then try using one of the many Linux-based partitioning tools. If Windows breaks something first and Linux lets them recover something, anything, or even fully, magically, Linux isn't so bad.

    If Linux doesn't help at all, then the probably was too far gone already - obviously true since Windows didn't help either.

    For experienced Linux people, 1st they know and have backups. They are willing to wipe everything and reload using those backups. Great backups are extremely freeing. I don't worry about hardware failures, hardware being stole, dumb mistakes, viruses, or malware.

    Needing to resize partitions can take more effort and downtime than wiping everything, installing fresh and restoring from good backups.

    Good backups have 1001 uses, not just the obvious list. Sleeping well at night is one of those uses too.

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