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Thread: Use NAS media server as home directory in home

  1. #11
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    Re: Use NAS media server as home directory in home

    Quote Originally Posted by tomtom447 View Post
    I already have the directories mounted but they are not synced, merged, linked by or mounted into the home directory...the goal of this post. I want (for example) music located on the NAS to be shown in the music folder of the home directory in all computers and if I are content to one of the computers it should show up on the NAS and all other computers connected. I just don't know if I should use a symbolic link, use some mount script or what. I also want some directory to share between users over the NAS.
    If you have the NAS directories mounted to a directory using NFS, perhaps /Music/ on the Linux machine,
    1. ln -s /Music ~/MUSIC # that will create a symbolic link to the /Music directory. ~/MUSIC cannot pre-exist.
    2. Everything under /Music is accessible in ~/MUSIC

    You can do the same for Documents and anything else.
    ~/MUSIC is NOT the same as ~/Music or ~/music. All are different than ~/MUSIC.
    I wouldn't directly mount NAS storage into any HOME directory for a number of subtle reasons.

    You can use normal Unix file and directory permissions to control the access to the files by different userids on each system.

    If other people's directions above here are clearer, then use those. I wanted to shortest example possible.
    Last edited by TheFu; 5 Days Ago at 07:50 PM.

  2. #12
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    Re: Use NAS media server as home directory in home

    Thank you SeijiSensei and TheFu, I think symbolic links will do nicely. I wasn't sure what was the best solution. On the NAS each user gets a separate directory and a predefined set of permissions within a home directory, so I populated the user accounts with the folders I wanted and set a permanent mount on the computers that logins a user to the account on the NAS when they login to the computer. I just have to symlink the directories into ~home and make sure any applications can save docs, media... to the NAS through symlink.

    I don't know about sharing a folder across user accounts on OMV as I think I would need an add-on for that... OMV like most NAS is a bit different than a server and not as straightforward, but I chose it to be more of a rounded, complete out of the box, and all in one IS I have worked on other servers that are a bit easier to manage settings wise, but I didn't want to build a ui from scratch to manage things on the go and it has all the tools included in that interface. Hopefully I will be able to set this up with your instructions, and will come back with results.
    Last edited by tomtom447; 4 Days Ago at 12:13 AM.

  3. #13
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    Re: Use NAS media server as home directory in home

    Quote Originally Posted by tomtom447 View Post
    I don't know about sharing a folder across user accounts on OMV as I think I would need an add-on for that... OMV like most NAS is a bit different than a server and not as straightforward, but I chose it to be more of a rounded, complete out of the box, and all in one IS I have worked on other servers that are a bit easier to manage settings wise, but I didn't want to build a ui from scratch to manage things on the go and it has all the tools included in that interface. Hopefully I will be able to set this up with your instructions, and will come back with results.
    Standard Unix file and directory permissions handle this need. People working together in groups is a standard thing for Unix systems and has been since the early 1970s. By using NFS, you have access to groups and can setup a shared group if you want everyone to have write access to the same files. But if you only intend for the accounts to have read-only access - that's what the "other" part of the permissions are all about.

    chmod is the command to manage permissions. Beware that root/sudo on a different machine using NFS access cannot change anything. This is a security default for NFS.

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