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Thread: Desktop computer

  1. #1
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    May 2012
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    8

    Desktop computer

    Who makes a good Linux Desktop computer?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
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    Ubuntu Budgie Development Release

    Re: Desktop computer

    Not a support request, moved to Ubuntu Linux & OS Chat.
    “Start where you are. Use what you have. Do what you can".

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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    England, United Kingdom
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    48
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    Ubuntu

    Re: Desktop computer

    That depends, companies vary, I for one go for the Novatech company and buy a computer without and operating system installed so that I can have Linux on it. You can have many other companies doing the same like for example PC Specialists, Origin PC etc.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Albuquerque New Mexico, U
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    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Desktop computer

    Linux support for desktops isn't the big adventure that it can be for laptops. For the most part, it just works. Support for CPUs and PCHs is excellent and generally available when new products hit the store shelves (we'll see how well AMD prepared for the Ryzen 3000/x570 motherboards in just about six weeks.).

    Intel and Nvidia graphics subsystems are generally well-supported. AMD/ATI graphics too, although historically it may take a a full release cycle before your chosen distribution makes the driver sets that deliver satisfactory performance and reliability available for a brand new chipset. A very, very few AMD desktop chipsets have proven to be particularly touchy about working with Linux...these are generally integrated CPU/GPU (known as APUs) like the 2200 series.

    If there are going to be issues it will be with support for peripherals like network adapters or audio subsystems, or "features" that are strictly cosmetic, like support for inside the case LED lighting. You can blame the motherboard manufacturers as they don't provide Linux compatible versions of their software utilities.

    The best advice I can offer is to do your shopping, pick a specific product and then post another question asking people to relate their experience with that specific product.
    regards

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Xubuntu

    Re: Desktop computer

    One bit of advice: make sure that you are actually buying a desktop and not a desktop with a laptop motherboard in it! I know that sounds crazy, but I have run into 2 such machines lately. The telltale thing is to look at the power cord: if it is a brick (like what you get with a laptop) do NOT buy it!

    Both of these machines were in a standard desktop case, but both had tiny little MBs in them. No way to upgrade anything except adding some memory. No slots for GPUs, sound cards, etc.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
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    Magic City of the Plains
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    Xubuntu 19.04 Disco Dingo

    Re: Desktop computer

    I've had good luck with Dell desktops, for general home use. The XPS series has been reliable. I upgrade the video hardware though.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
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    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Desktop computer

    I know some HP laptops are hard to convert off Windows because of some non-standard UEFI elements. I have no experience with recent HP desktops.
    regards

  8. #8
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    Mar 2010
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    Squidbilly-Land
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    Ubuntu Mate 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: Desktop computer

    Putting the parts into a computer is easier than building a Lego tie fighter. The parts are all key'd so they only fit one direction these days. The manual explains the order to do it and if you watch one youtube video on putting the parts into a case, it is pretty easy.

    If you have a screwdriver and 45 minutes, you can get excellent, specific, components and almost always reuse existing parts to save 50% on a new desktop. There have been some freakin' amazing deals on AMD Ryzen and motherboards the last few months. $130 MB+CPU combos for a Ryzen 1600 are still going on now. Add 8-16G of DDR4 RAM for $50-$100 and you have a smokin system for under $250. Reuse the case, PSU, keyboard, mouse, monitor, GPU, HDD(s), SSD(s), speakers, webcam ... whatever else you have. About 6 months ago, I build a little faster machine for over $400, which was a crazy deal at the time. RAM prices have dropped about 50% in the last 6 months.

    Most of my cases in use today are from early 2000 timeframes. It is just a case. They don't wear out.

    CPUs that come with a fan (like the Ryzen 5 line) will have the thermal paste pre-applied, so even that part is already handled perfectly. As others have stated above, the only real concern is using Ryzen-based APUs, like the 2200g, 2400g and newer 3xxxg lines coming out next month.

    What better reputation do you need when you can pick the exact motherboard, which is the most important component for any OS compatibility.

    Also, beware that small cases usually mean smaller size motherboards. There are 2 standards, ITX and microATX. These trade size for expansion. "Shuttle" is a brand that makes boot-box sized computers with good performance, good price, but limited expansion to fit into the cases which are about half the size of a mid-tower. These don't cost $120+ more than equivalent desktops like NUC versions do. NUCs are as small as possible and effectively have zero way to upgrade anything inside the box. The Shuttle brand computers generally support half length GPUs and (2) 3.5" hdds and come with multiple NICs, USB3, eSATA and optical connections. I've run Ubuntu on Shuttles for family members since 2010. They liked the smallish size and that the cost wasn't out of line with normal systems.

    Building isn't for everyone, but if you'd like to save $200+ on a new system, it is definitely worth considering.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    19th Hole
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    Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    Re: Desktop computer

    Quote Originally Posted by TheFu View Post
    Putting the parts into a computer is easier than building a Lego tie fighter.
    A Lego tie fighter may be easy for you! Not so much for me.
    …if you'd like to save $200+ on a new system, it is definitely worth considering.
    Not sure that one could save $200 these days. The thing about pre-assembled machines is that, even with the MS tax, the assembly-line nature of the build, the low third-world labour rates and the bulk-buy component discounts available to the OEM (but not to us) often make them more cost-effective than spinning your own box.

    I build my own not because it's less expensive, but because I can dictate exactly what I want and thereby highly customize it. If one sticks to proven. mainstream components that are neither too old nor too new, Ubuntu installs like a champ.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
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    Pennsylvania
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    Xubuntu

    Re: Desktop computer

    +1 with Duckhook. I had purchased an RX590 8 gig video card. Upon installing it, it evidently was defective and shorted out my motherboard wiping out the sound and replacing it with a loud static noise. Reinstalling the old sound card did not repair my sound. Further diag showed that the MB had been ruined. The manufacturer of the card and seller of the card both said that it wasn't their fault and both refused to offer any assistance.

    So, I considered upgrading that machine or building a new one. I also looked for deals on pre-built systems.

    My new machine cost about $15 more than what the parts would have cost before I added and shipping costs. And, I still had to wonder what would happen if I got another bad part that would take out other new parts. In the end, I purchased a complete unit and let the warranty fall on the supplier.

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