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Thread: files in .gnupg

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    40

    files in .gnupg

    Hi
    Why I have after 30min or so, even with booting from live cd, two additional files in the .gnupg folder?
    I had that on my old hacked pc, but on a 2 days old new laptop?
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
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    40

    Re: files in .gnupg

    Anyone could confirm that? What is that? Thanks

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Beans
    8,701
    Distro
    Ubuntu Mate

    Re: files in .gnupg

    Hi,

    You're not exactly giving us much to go on.

    What files?

    Show us the output please for

    Code:
    ls -l
    And what do you mean by
    even with booting from live cd
    What exactly does that mean?

    Oh, and it would also help if we knew what version of Ubuntu you are using.

    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Beans
    40

    Re: files in .gnupg

    Hi
    on my new pc I've not yet installed a harddisk nor network. Selected "try ubuntu without installing". Ubuntu 19.04. If it's not readable I could try another screenshot. Are those used for encrypted downloads?
    Many thanks
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    8,701
    Distro
    Ubuntu Mate

    Re: files in .gnupg

    Hi,

    Ah, okay now it is clear.

    Not exactly encrypted downloads but it is encryption:
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/GnuPrivacyGuardHowto
    https://packages.ubuntu.com/search?keywords=gnupg

    Be aware that during both live testing and installation many temp files are created and then later deleted during the cleanup phases.

    I do not think there is something to be concerned about but if you have other questions feel free to ask.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Beans
    40

    Re: files in .gnupg

    Thanks, I feel better… although on any clean system that I've heard those do not appear.
    Can I get info about that? I've tried to open those files in some apps without success. If I delete them, they're back in a while.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
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    8,701
    Distro
    Ubuntu Mate

    Re: files in .gnupg

    Still not clear to me which files you are referring to and why you need to delete them.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2018
    Beans
    40

    Re: files in .gnupg

    So that's normal on a fresh ubuntu? Anyone else has those?
    http://de.tinypic.com/r/ws9uzb/9
    seems weird that some app uses encryption.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Beans
    8,701
    Distro
    Ubuntu Mate

    Re: files in .gnupg

    I'm unable to confirm because I use a different setup when installing, meaning I use the minimal install which only adds a browser and core utilities needed for functionality.

    But, Thunderbird email client would likely use GPG so in that case I guess those files are normal.

    And there are probably also other applications that use GPG for example GNOME keyring which is used for logins etc.

    Again, personally I do not see an issue with those files but there may be others with different experiences.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    19th Hole
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    Re: files in .gnupg

    gnupg is the Gnome implementation of pgp. It is a very good security feature if used properly and is associated with GPG2. Those files are harmless and in fact necessary for GPG2 to function properly:

    https://www.gnupg.org/documentation/...iguration.html

    However, unless GPG2 has been invoked for some other use, it is unusual to see these files created. Given the OP's concern with security, it would not be surprising to have these files inadvertantly created by a process that he/she may have initiated but think was unrelated. GPG2 is used at a low level to support many app functions or extensions: for example, Enigmail in Thunderbird, many VPN implementations, etc. Too many to list.

    • pubring.kbx is the public keyring keybox which is used to store generated public keys.
    • trustdb.gpg is the file containing the trust database
    • Everyone with a typical install has the private-keys-vl1.d which is the directory containing our private gpg keys. Even if we have no keys, the directory is generated.

    Fooling around with these files/directories will almost certainly break some app functionalities that depend on them. However, they are admittedly obscure and difficult to parse.

    @OP

    Encryption is used all the time and, in fact, should be used more, not less. All HTTPS web pages are encrypted. The best e-mail protocols use encryption. A popular one is gmail in which all data streams are encrypted until they reach their endpoints. While your typical update download is not encrypted, it uses a signing and verification scheme that is inseparably tied to modern encryption methodology. It's just that these apps use a self-contained encryption container instead of GPG.

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