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Thread: can lm_sensors still damage hardware?

  1. #1
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    Question can lm_sensors still damage hardware?

    I just ran lm_sensors and foolishly typed YES to everything.. This is a brand new PC I've built and I'm worried I've damaged something now. Then I read that it can overwrite EEPROM and damage hardware from probing i2c. This is a recent desktop chipset based on Intel series 300 (b360) with an i3-8100.

    Is lm_sensors still a risk? I'm kinda freaking out here, how would I even know if something was damaged?





  2. #2
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    Re: can lm_sensors still damage hardware?

    I always say yes to everything. I've never had a problem.

  3. #3
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    Re: can lm_sensors still damage hardware?

    Have you selected YES to everything and on what hardware? I mean my hardware seems to be working fine, but I wouldn't even know if it was messed up.
    Last edited by Nader_Nooryani; February 8th, 2019 at 01:14 PM.

  4. #4
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    Re: can lm_sensors still damage hardware?

    Quote Originally Posted by Nader_Nooryani View Post
    Have you selected YES to everything
    Quote Originally Posted by CatKiller View Post
    I always say yes to everything.
    and on what hardware?
    Everything I've wanted sensor output from.

    I mean my hardware seems to be working fine, but I wouldn't even know if it was messed up.
    You would know if it was messed up. Which means that it isn't.

    sensors-detect works by poking everything with a stick and seeing what happens. If you're running it on a drone, or a robot, or some other embedded system, there may be things other than sensors on those buses, and they might not react in the expected way to being poked with a stick. That's why the warning's there.

    On normal computers it's only sensors that use the inter-integrated circuit bus to communicate. I guess RGB lighting might, too. Everything important will use one of the higher-speed buses, like PCIe.
    None but ourselves can free our minds

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