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Thread: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

  1. #1
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    Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    Come February my beloved 14.04 LTS will no longer be supported so I guess I am forced to upgrade.

    I wonder what would be the less painful way to do it.
    I am not at all concerned about hardware issues as I can easily test the new release live (or even with a permanent install on another drive), and I am not concerned about data loss. Most data are on a separate drive and I can easily backup the home folder to the same drive or others.

    What worries me is retaining the software packages which I installed through the years and need to keep.
    I don't want to be in the situation when I need a software and it's no longer available on my machine, or unusable.
    Some required adding specific PPA's and for sure some are no longer available.
    Major concern is also related to V-box as I use it A LOT to run Win7 for CAD applications which are not available on Linux.

    Any advice as to what release I should upgrade to, in order to reduce the chance of issues, would also be much appreciated.
    I think I read somewhere some months ago, that in 18.04 it is no longer possible to launch programs as root (such as Nautilus for example).
    Not sure if there is a workaround to this problem, but this fact alone would be enough to keep me from upgrading to 18.04.

    As far as the machine the system is running on, it is I3 with an integrated Intel Video board and 6 gigs of RAM.
    Wonder if I should evaluate upgrading to a lighter version of Ubuntu as the machine is not "old" but it's not new either, and how this would impact on the upgrade.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated.

    Edit: Forgot to mention I am only considering upgrades to LTS versions.
    Last edited by gumbo64; 1 Week Ago at 07:49 PM.

  2. #2
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    Re: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    I think that you should do a clean install as you will otherwise have to manage two separate upgrade processes, first from 14.04 to 16.04, and then from 16.04 to 18.04 which will both take a long time and will also double the opportunities for problems to occur.

    I have never used the upgrade process from one OS version to the next so I am perhaps speaking from a partisan point of view, and I know some users manage online upgrades without too many problems, so it is your choice, but I know what I would do.

    As to your list of manually installed applications that you want to be certain will still work, it is impossible to comment as we have no idea what they are, or were. If you show us a list of those applications we may be able to help more with that query.

    Your major concern about VBox is one you can forget; I use VBox-6.0 which I keep updated using the Oracle repos, set up according to the info in the "Debian-based-Linux-Distributions" section at https://www.virtualbox.org/wiki/Linux_Downloads. It is working fine with Windows-XP and also Windows-7 so you ought not to have a problem with that; I just ensure I have a good working snapshot of both of those just in case they become corrupted or virus infected. Make sure you install the correct same version of the Guest additions pack which you can download from https://download.virtualbox.org/virt...0.vbox-extpack and you should get great performance, or at least as good as you did in 14.04 if you allocate the same amount of RAM to the guest
    .

    There are also ways to overcome the potential problems of not being able to use gksudo (no longer available) if you wish to use nautilus as root, very dangerous but I'm aware many use it that way, so we can work around that problem with you if you if you are unable to, or do not want to do things in command line.

    I think your machine should be able to run the gnome version (the default now) of Ubuntu even in VBox, but as you can see, I use Xubuntu and have done so for many years, preferring Xfce4 to any other DE available.

    Again it's your choice; use whichever DE you want or which works best for you.
    DISTRO: Xubuntu 18.04-64bit --- Code-tags --- Boot-Repair --- Grub2 wiki & Grub2 Basics --- RootSudo --- Wireless-Info --- SolvedThreads

  3. #3
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    Re: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    Since you're already familiar with VMs, you can play with both 16.04 and 18.04 in a VM to see what's available for each of them.

    It's possible to export a list of all the packages you've installed so that you can then simply install all of them again in one go.

    All the environments are pretty snappy these days - there's not much between them for system requirements as long as you're on 64-bit. It's only really web content that drives the need for bigger and faster now, and that's going to be the same whichever environment you prefer.

  4. #4
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    Re: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    What if I run

    sudo apt-get clean
    sudo apt-get update
    sudo apt-get dist-upgrade -y:
    sudo do-release-upgrade

    and maybe

    sudo apt-get autoremove -y

    As far as GKSU, can I install it from

    https://pkgs.org/download/gksu

    or follow this guide

    https://ubuntu-mate.community/t/for-...s-gksu/16744/5

  5. #5
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    Re: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    And a list of the most commonly used applications:

    Blender
    QCad
    Freecad
    Meshmixer
    Meshlab
    Ultimaker Cura

    Gimp
    Inkscape
    Phatch

    Disks
    Freefilesync
    TarGui
    FSlint
    GrSync with GUI
    Kompare
    Meld
    Unison
    Filelight

    Shotcut
    Kdenlive
    SynfigStudio
    SimpleScreeRecorder
    Audacity

    Cairodock
    Filezilla
    Unetbootin
    Vbox
    Firefox bookmarks

    Some of these apps have settings and profiles which would take a lot of time to recreate if at all possible...like the printer profile settings in Cura, just to name one.
    Last edited by gumbo64; 1 Week Ago at 10:50 PM.

  6. #6
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    Re: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    Quote Originally Posted by gumbo64 View Post
    Some of these apps have settings and profiles which would take a lot of time to recreate if at all possible
    Settings are kept in your Home folder. You should be back that up, generally, anyway. Many people choose to keep /home as a separate partition to make reinstalls easier.

    If you go for 16.04 you don't need to upgrade unless you want to before 2021. If you go for 18.04 you get till 2023. Either option is fine.

    I've never had any real problems with upgrading-in-place, but others have. It's something to be aware of as a possible outcome.

    This seems like a fairly in-depth answer to getting the list of packages that you've explicitly installed yourself. There are simpler ways of simply getting a list of all the installed packages if you just want replication.
    None but ourselves can free our minds

  7. #7
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    Re: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    Is it possible to make copy of the whole drive onto another drive to see what happens when I upgrade ?
    I remember it required a specific procedure with windows, like creating a "ghost" image of the original drive. Many years since I switched to Linux so this could be out of date now.
    Anyway, is a "special" procedure required also in linux/ubuntu or a simple "copy" of the original drive will do, for testing purposes ?

  8. #8
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    Re: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    It depends how precise you want the copy to be.

    dd will copy everything bit-for-bit, so it will be an exact clone. You won't be able to boot with both copies attached, since the UUIDs of the partitions (used to identify which partition to boot from) will be replicated too, and it will take ages because it will copy the empty parts too.

    Any of Déjà Dup, rsync or tar will be fine for just copying the files. If you're on UEFI you'd need to make a new EFI partition (which I'm hazy on), or on BIOS you'd need to install GRUB to the MBR, before you could boot from the new drive.

    If it were me, I'd play around with both 16.04 and 18.04 in VMs to see which I disliked the least, make sure my backups were adequate, and then do the upgrade(s). If it all works: great, if not: fresh install and restore settings from backup. Then look at it again in a couple of years.
    Last edited by CatKiller; 1 Week Ago at 02:59 AM.
    None but ourselves can free our minds

  9. #9
    Join Date
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    Kubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    1. do a fresh install. there were so many changes between 14.04 and 16.04 in user interface as well as in background (systemd, grub changes...). i spent 6 hours on upgrade ending up in kernel panic system, then i did a clean install on 18.04 in 20 minutes.

    2.
    Quote Originally Posted by gumbo64 View Post
    Is it possible to make copy of the whole drive onto another drive to see what happens when I upgrade ?
    I remember it required a specific procedure with windows, like creating a "ghost" image of the original drive. Many years since I switched to Linux so this could be out of date now.
    Anyway, is a "special" procedure required also in linux/ubuntu or a simple "copy" of the original drive will do, for testing purposes ?
    clonezilla will do that for you easily. they have a step by step guide (print it before launching clonezilla which uses text based menus.

    you can also just backup /home and /etc and restore only what is needed (maybe some settings etc.). settings for apps like firefox , filezilla... are all in hidden folders in /home

    3. gksu is no longer supported. however instead of that you can use:

    sudo -H applicationname

    for more informaiton see here: https://askubuntu.com/questions/2700...l-applications
    here along with the second option - pkexec: https://askubuntu.com/questions/2878...nfigure-pkexec

    debate on what to use in forums: https://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2130734


    Before upgrade you SHOULD backup at least all your data and at minimum the /home folder!!!
    Easy to understand Ubuntu manual with lots of pics: http://ubuntu-manual.org/
    Do i need antivirus/firewall in linux?
    User friendly disk backup (suitable for older PCs): Redobackup Less friendly disk backup (works on new PC): Clonezilla

  10. #10
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    Re: Time to upgrade my 14.04 LTS

    Just to play devils advocate here, I have now done my 2nd version upgrade without doing a clean install. My machine came with 13.10 installed and I upgraded to 14.04 when it became available. Just last spring I upgraded to 16.04, again, no clean install and everything went very smoothly. I don't see a need for you to go any further than 16.04 at this time. I have virtualbox installed also and didn't experience any issues there. As always, be sure to have your current setup fully up to date, then backup at least /home or use clonezilla to create an image, then i deselect ppa's and do the upgrade.

    My system is a Sys76 Gazelle Pro i7 w/16GB memory and 1T drive.

    Good luck which ever way you choose, but thought your should know that not all of us just choose to wipe everything and start fresh.

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