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Thread: retrieving data from non booting lvm partition

  1. #11
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    Re: retrieving data from non booting lvm partition

    Code:
    sudo rsync -avz  /tmp/disk/home/simon  /media/ubuntu/SAMSUNG/
    That will make a 'simon' directory under SAMSUNG with all the data (and more) that you can stand.

    But really the userid, groupid, and permissions stuff like this is something you should learn.
    http://linuxcommand.org/tlcl.php is a free pdf you can download without being hassled. It does a good job explaining those topics in the correct order. Unix permissions are central to all Unix/Linux security.

  2. #12
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    Aug 2016
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    Re: retrieving data from non booting lvm partition

    Success!

    rsync is working as I write.

    Can't thank you enough.

    I will certainly read up on the commands as you suggest.

    Would you advise a beginner like me to stick to ext4 partitions rather than the lvm2 that I saddled myself with?

  3. #13
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    Re: retrieving data from non booting lvm partition

    Quote Originally Posted by simongatti View Post
    Success!

    rsync is working as I write.

    Can't thank you enough.

    I will certainly read up on the commands as you suggest.

    Would you advise a beginner like me to stick to ext4 partitions rather than the lvm2 that I saddled myself with?
    Yes and no. It depends. There are things that only LVM can accomplish and if you don't have it, then getting it is basically a fresh install. LVM brings lots of flexibility at the cost of increased complexity.

    I use LVM always on physical storage, but I follow a few rules to avoid being burned. I've lost 80% of my data around 2002 using LVM features that didn't turn out well. I haven't used those features since. But I do use the resize up/down and snapshots all-the-time. Actually, I use snapshots daily, on almost every system here, as part of my backup scripts. Consistent backups with zero downtime, guaranteed? Can't do that any other supported way that I know. Gotta have LVM for it.

    But if you don't need to resize LVs or have perfect backups with zero downtime, then LVM might not be worth the extra hassle. I can't say. Resizing LVs up and down along with the file system only works if ext4 is used. Lots of other vendors push using xfs + LVM, but those can only be resized up, never down. I never correctly size LVs on my first attempt, even after all these decades.

    There is ZFS, which merges LVM and a file system, but ZFS isn't supported as a boot file system on Ubuntu. It is fully supported for data storage, just not booting - so not for /boot/, /, /var/, ... you get the idea. ZFS has some very advanced capabilities beyond what LVM+EXT4 support. ZFS is a little less complex in some ways and a lot more complex in others.

    There is also BTRFS, which tries to be a lighter ZFS with advanced feature. Early on, it had data loss issues and compatibility issues with some core things I use, so I never considered BTRFS useful. Last year, Redhat deprecated support for it and now it seems to only have SuSE for support. BTRFS doesn't integrate correctly with other tools - basically, it lies about storage to df and du, which I find completely unacceptable. Those tools are 2nd nature to me. They are 100% THE TRUTH. Any tool that doesn't let df/du tell the truth doesn't get used on my systems.

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