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Thread: laptop switches off abruptly and randomly on battery power but not on mains power

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Beans
    209
    Distro
    Ubuntu Mate 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    laptop switches off abruptly and randomly on battery power but not on mains power

    I'm not sure whether this is a purely hardware issue or whether software or Linux is involved.

    I have had this Toshiba Satellite C50D-A-11Q running without problems under Ubuntu 12.04 since 2013.
    More recently the battery got old and I ran it connected to mains power nearly all the time.

    This summer I bought a new battery and installed Ubuntu Mate 16.04.

    Now, randomly, but at least once between disconnecting the power cable when the battery is fully charged and when the battery becomes empty, the computer will abruptly turn off (as if both the battery and mains power had been removed). This is inconvenient because I lose work. The computer will always restart on pressing the ON button.

    Here are some data after the last occurence:

    I installed psensor with logging.
    In the 30 seconds before it switched off, cpu etc temperatures were
    51.5, 51.5 and 50.0 degrees C
    Battery was probably around 33.7 degrees C

    And another graph of typical temperatures:
    Screenshot at 2017-10-07 10:50:44.jpg

    Here is a screenshot of the Power Statistics window after restart:
    after shutdown Screenshot at 2017-10-06 19:49:46.png
    Is there anything odd about those temperatures and charges?

    Is there anything known about Ubuntu in connection with this?
    I have a Toshiba Satellite C50D laptop with 3.4 GB of RAM and (AMD E1-1200 APU @ 1.4 GHz with Radeon HD Graphics) x 2 processor; (older posts refer to 8.04, 9.10, 12.04 on this or other hardware).

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Elgin, IL USA
    Beans
    3,363
    Distro
    Ubuntu 16.10 Yakkety Yak

    Re: laptop switches off abruptly and randomly on battery power but not on mains power

    Maybe that battery was not the deal you thought it was. Note that maximum charge of your battery is only 71.1% of its original rated capacity and voltage is down to 10.6V. I forget what minimum voltage is for li-ion batteries, but nominal (rated) voltage is 3.7V/cell (11.1V for 3-cell) and fully charged voltage should be about 4.2V/cell. This is an example of a recently charged 3-cell battery in a low end HP laptop (about 1 yr old not used much), without as much rated capacity, but energy-full still 98.9% of energy-full-design.
    Code:
    ~$ upower -i /org/freedesktop/UPower/devices/battery_BAT1
      native-path:          BAT1
      vendor:               COMPAL
      model:                PABAS0241231
      serial:               41167
      power supply:         yes
      updated:              Sat 07 Oct 2017 03:35:09 PM CDT (53 seconds ago)
      has history:          yes
      has statistics:       yes
      battery
        present:             yes
        rechargeable:        yes
        state:               discharging
        warning-level:       none
        energy:              26.5647 Wh
        energy-empty:        0 Wh
        energy-full:         30.868 Wh
        energy-full-design:  31.2075 Wh
        energy-rate:         7.71975 W
        voltage:             11.724 V
        time to empty:       3.4 hours
        percentage:          86%
        capacity:            98.9123%
        technology:          lithium-ion
        icon-name:          'battery-full-symbolic'
    Note that you should not leave a device with li-ion battery plugged in all of the time, and should minimize time fully discharged, other than occasionally briefly running it down on battery power while not doing anything essential to keep battery meter in the OS calibrated, so it can accurately tell you when about to lose power (should charge the battery soon after that). Li-ion batteries actually last longer at half charge than long periods fully charged or fully discharged (something you learn when using similar, but soft cased lithium-polymer batteries in R/C aircraft).

    I know that some AMD cpus do not like to see over 60C temperature, but that one is rated for 100C max.
    Last edited by efflandt; October 7th, 2017 at 10:12 PM.
    i5 650 3.2 GHz upgraded to i7 870, 16 GB 1333 RAM, nvidia GTX 1060, 32" 1080p & assorted older computers

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