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Thread: Cryptic output from lspci

  1. #11
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    Temujin, I have several display adapters on hand, and I intentionally chose a basic one. Given my objective, which is to learn more about Linux and the supporting hardware, I think it was a good choice. It gave me occasion to ask some questions that you could answer, and I learned something from that. It also gave me occasion to ask some questions that you couldn't answer, and you could learn something from that.

    I haven't heard of the xorg log before. I looked it up, but askubuntu.com says it's in ~/.local/share/xorg, and my system has no log file there. This information may be useful in the future, but it doesn't appear to be immediately relevant.

    The list of NVIDIA cards you provided will definitely be useful in the future, and I appreciate it. It would be more useful if it had pictures, though. Since I don't have a meaningful model number, I haven't got much information to search for.

    I'm going to try other display adapters and see what I can learn. Perhaps I'll have more luck getting assistance if lspci says something cryptic about a higher-end card.

  2. #12
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    Your xorg log can be found in
    Code:
    /var/log/Xorg.0.log
    It can get pretty fat so you might consider posting it to pastebin, rather than try posting it directly in thread.
    See https://help.ubuntu.com/community/Pastebinit
    for how to setup for pastebin on Ubuntu.
    Splat Double Splat Triple Splat
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    Don't mind me, I'm only passing through.
    Once in a blue moon, I'm actually helpful
    .

  3. #13
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    Quote Originally Posted by orthoducks View Post
    There's no problem at all with the board. The "problem" is with lspci and other diagnostic software in/for Ubuntu: I'm trying to learn to use the tools effectively, and my installed display adapter seemed like a logical place to start.
    It depends on what sort of user you are.

    If you are just and end user then, to diagnose problems with hardware, lspci is a good tool.

    If you have a problem you use that utility to discover what linux recognizes your hardware as and you paste it into a search engine.
    Hopefully someone else has had the same problem and there is a solution or a workaround.
    If you have no luck then you file a bug report.

    Then, hopefully, in time, it gets fixed and the next person who has your issue finds the answer with a search engine.

    To fix the actual linux drivers yourself is a whole other thing.

  4. #14
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    Quote Originally Posted by orthoducks View Post
    Temujin, I have several display adapters on hand, and I intentionally chose a basic one. Given my objective, which is to learn more about Linux and the supporting hardware, I think it was a good choice. It gave me occasion to ask some questions that you could answer, and I learned something from that. It also gave me occasion to ask some questions that you couldn't answer, and you could learn something from that.
    I realize my previous post may have been perceived as a bit condescending, and I apologize if that's the case. It's not how I meant it. I find it interesting that you have a device that's not formally named in the PCI ID database, and would like to see the Xorg log, so that perhaps we can contribute meaningful information to the PCI ID database to give this device a name. It's like finding a new star in the sky... or something.

    I haven't heard of the xorg log before. I looked it up, but askubuntu.com says it's in ~/.local/share/xorg
    It's /var/log/Xorg.0.log, as I pointed out in post #8, and as deadflowr pointed out.

    Since I don't have a meaningful model number, I haven't got much information to search for.
    I think "GK208" is about as meaningful as you're going to get at this point given Nvidia's model number games (and they're not the only company guilty of this kind of flimflammery).

  5. #15
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    Temujin, your explanation is accepted, with no hard feelings.

    I've posted the log to pastebin (neat tool, I didn't know about it although I've done the equivalent with my own hosted site). The URL is http://paste.ubuntu.com/23657061/.

    "GK208" is pretty uninformative. It's kind of like: What kind of car do you drive? "It's a Ford." But what kind of Ford? "A sedan." I hope the log says more, but I'm not very hopeful; I looked in the vicinity of every instance of NVIDIA, and I didn't find anything informative. I gather that Ubuntu tried to load a driver, or something driver-like, that it couldn't find; if I install that, perhaps it will tell me more.

  6. #16
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    I'm back, with a more muscular video card to ask questions about. (I've been very busy since I was last here... just not busy with video cards.)

    This is a double-width, half-length card with two DVI connectors and two HDMI connectors. It has a fan (!) and an 8-pin power connector. The silkscreening assures me that it was made by NVIDIA, but does not disclose a model number. According to lspci and lshw, it's an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 760.

    But all of the 760's that I've seen on the web are full length cards. I think it might be a 750, but the 750's I've seen have one DVI connector, not two.

    Here's what lshw says about the card:

    Code:
      *-display               
           description: VGA compatible controller
           product: GK104 [GeForce GTX 760]
           vendor: NVIDIA Corporation
           physical id: 0
           bus info: pci@0000:01:00.0
           version: a1
           width: 64 bits
           clock: 33MHz
           capabilities: pm msi pciexpress vga_controller bus_master cap_list rom
           configuration: driver=nouveau latency=0
            resources: irq:28 memory:fd000000-fdffffff memory:f0000000-f7ffffff  memory:f8000000-f9ffffff ioport:cc00(size=128) memory:fe000000-fe07ffff
    I'd like to get more information, or more comprehensible information; I really don't know what the last three lines mean. I'd like to know how much RAM is installed, for example. And I'd like to know what model the card really is.

    I found references to a utility named "NVIDIA Inspector" that provides a lot more information, in a GUI, no less. Alas, it only runs under Windows.

  7. #17
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    Nvidia manufactures the chips, but not most of the cards (unless a Master series), so they may have different video outputs.

    The GTX 750 (and 750 Ti) is a newer card than the other 7xx series and was one of the first ones (along with GTX 970 & 980) to have the new efficient Maxwell chip. The GTX 750's only use 60 watts max (hardware regulated), so they usually do not have an external power connector (since PCI Express slot spec should provide 75 watts). The MSI Twin Frozr Gaming GTX 750 Ti OC that I have has 1-DVI, 1-VGA, and 1-HDMI output.

    So it is quite possible that the card you have is correctly identified by lspci as a GTX 760. Earlier cards like a GTX 550 Ti that I have with 2-DVI ports (and 1-miniHDMI) were DVI-I which had both digital and analog pins, so they could do DVI to VGA with a simple adapter or cable, but I do not know if one or both of your DVI ports do that.

    Once you install an nvidia driver package (which you can do from Additional Drivers), there is nvidia-smi command which can tell much more about the card (especially with -q), but this is the brief output for a GTX 1060:
    Code:
    efflandt@msata512-1610:~$ nvidia-smi
    Sat Feb 18 18:03:40 2017       
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    | NVIDIA-SMI 378.09                 Driver Version: 378.09                    |
    |-------------------------------+----------------------+----------------------+
    | GPU  Name        Persistence-M| Bus-Id        Disp.A | Volatile Uncorr. ECC |
    | Fan  Temp  Perf  Pwr:Usage/Cap|         Memory-Usage | GPU-Util  Compute M. |
    |===============================+======================+======================|
    |   0  GeForce GTX 106...  Off  | 0000:01:00.0      On |                  N/A |
    | 28%   27C    P8     8W / 120W |    336MiB /  3012MiB |      0%      Default |
    +-------------------------------+----------------------+----------------------+
                                                                                   
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    | Processes:                                                       GPU Memory |
    |  GPU       PID  Type  Process name                               Usage      |
    |=============================================================================|
    |    0     26226    G   /usr/lib/xorg/Xorg                             193MiB |
    |    0     26973    G   /usr/bin/compiz                                141MiB |
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    For example this one shows 8W being used and 120W cap. If yours shows more than 60W cap it is definitely not a GTX 750 (or Ti). GTX 760 would be capped at 170W. So you can see the efficiency improvement going from GTX 760 to newer GTX 1060 (faster using 50 less watts).
    Last edited by efflandt; February 19th, 2017 at 01:24 AM.
    i5 650 3.2 GHz upgraded to i7 870, 16 GB 1333 RAM, nvidia GTX 1060, 32" 1080p & assorted older computers

  8. #18
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    Dec 2016
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    efflandt, thank you for pointing out the NVIDIA driver package. Because Ubuntu supports NVIDIA adapters out of the (virtual) box, I didn't know there was a separate driver package, and didn't look for one. That will probably solve my problem completely, since most of the cards I need to test will be from NVIDIA. I'll report back after I've had a chance to experiment with the package.

    As a side note, when I said that "the silkscreening assures me that it was made by NVIDIA," I was referring to silkscreening on the circuit board, not the chips. Consequently I think we can rule out the possibility that the card was made by another company using NVIDIA chips. It's very unlikely that another manufacturer would want to put NVIDIA's name on its own product, or that NVIDIA would let it.

  9. #19
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    I opened Additional Drivers. It offered me an X.Org X-server-Nouveau display driver (initially selected) and two different versions of the "NVIDIA binary driver." I selected the one of the NVIDIA drivers that the application described as "tested." It installed the driver, then let me reboot, and when Ubuntu came up again, nvidia-smi was there.

    All of this sounds easy, but it had some bothersome aspects. Additional Drivers gave me no clue which driver was the better one for this adapter, or whether either one would even work. The one I selected turned out to work OK, but I don't know whether that's because any NVIDIA driver works at least OK with any NVIDIA card, or because I got insanely lucky.

    I wonder what will happen when I insert other NVIDIA adapters in the machine. Will this driver work with all of them, or will I have to install different drivers for different adapters? If this driver works with all adapters (or even with many), will nvidia-smi also work, or will it malfunction if the driver is wrong for the card? If nvidia-smi malfunctions, will it do so obviously or non-obviously? If I need different drivers for different adapters, can I avoid having to install a driver for each adapter I test by grouping adapters into families that use the same driver, and if I can do that, how?

    I'm asking all of these questions to give you an idea what kinds of uncertainty I'm dealing with. I don't expect you to answer each one (although I'll be delighted if you do); I hope you can give me some general advice that will help me become familiar with the territory I'm entering.

    I'll conclude by reproducing the information that nvidia-smi gave me. Beyond the obvious (this adapter is at least nominally a GTX 760), I'm not sure what is significant. Any comments, hints, etc. are welcome.

    I entered nvidia-smi -h and got a list of command line options (which I'll study), but I didn't see anything about how to interpret the output. I found a man page on NVIDIA's developer site, and it has a lot of information about the output, but it seems to be organized so that it's hard to understand unless you already understand it.

    I'm particularly puzzled by the value of 0 under "GPU." Is it saying that this card has no GPUs (or that for some reason no GPUs are functioning)? If so, what does that mean?
    Code:
    ~$ nvidia-smi
    Tue Feb 21 22:25:44 2017       
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    | NVIDIA-SMI 367.57                 Driver Version: 367.57                    |
    |-------------------------------+----------------------+----------------------+
    | GPU  Name        Persistence-M| Bus-Id        Disp.A | Volatile Uncorr. ECC |
    | Fan  Temp  Perf  Pwr:Usage/Cap|         Memory-Usage | GPU-Util  Compute M. |
    |===============================+======================+======================|
    |   0  GeForce GTX 760     Off  | 0000:01:00.0     N/A |                  N/A |
    | 30%   30C    P0    N/A /  N/A |    224MiB /  1997MiB |     N/A      Default |
    +-------------------------------+----------------------+----------------------+
                                                                                   
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    | Processes:                                                       GPU Memory |
    |  GPU       PID  Type  Process name                               Usage      |
    |=============================================================================|
    |    0                  Not Supported                                         |
    +-----------------------------------------------------------------------------+
    Last edited by wildmanne39; February 22nd, 2017 at 08:23 AM. Reason: Added Code Tags

  10. #20
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    Re: Cryptic output from lspci

    Please use code tags - if you are using New Reply button - highlight text and use the # button in the text box header.

    If using Quick Reply then [code] at the beginning and [/code] at the end.

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