Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 24 of 24

Thread: Square Root of RAM for swap space formula

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    The Left Coast of the USA
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Kubuntu

    Re: Square Root of RAM for swap space formula

    The square root of a number rounded up by a power of two is ... well ... the original number. Pointless tautology even back when (if) RedHat recommended that. A range beginning with the square root of the RAM and limited on the top end to the square root squared plus some arbitrary amount extra is also a silly and pointless calculation.

    It appears to me that whoever proposed that as documentation for whoever the distributor was had nothing better to do than be obnoxious on a day when he/she was writing documentation and trying to look busy.

    For varenorn: Ignore it. It's a silly exercise is useless computation. Swap = RAM size (plus maybe 10% because I used to be a construction project manager) is appropriate for desktop machines if you plan to hibernate. If you have 8GB+ and you don't plan to hibernate, there is probably little need for swap. I don't run swap on any of my machines.

    If you are running a server, you might either: Double the RAM as swap -- or better yet: add RAM, since that is faster and better able to handle extra loads.

    RAM used to be precious. Now it's cheap.

    That bit of the community wiki should probably go away quietly. It is something from a bygone age that was silly even then.
    Last edited by QIII; January 30th, 2016 at 10:14 PM.
    Please read The Forum Rules and The Forum Posting Guidelines

    A thing discovered and kept to oneself must be discovered time and again by others. A thing discovered and shared with others need be discovered only the once.
    This universe is crazy. I'm going back to my own.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Beans
    615

    Re: Square Root of RAM for swap space formula

    Quote Originally Posted by QIII View Post
    The square root of a number rounded up by a power of two is ... well ... the original number. Pointless tautology . . .
    You might want to rethink that.

    Example:
    square root of 100 = 10
    10 rounded up to a power of 2 = 16

    Look at the table.


    @ Oldfred:

    Thank you, old friend, Oldfred. You are indeed one of the main people I had in mind when I spoke of there being people here I think highly of in the post script I added to the post above. Hopefully, I'll bump into you on other fora. Farewell.
    Last edited by Dreamer Fithp Apprentice; January 30th, 2016 at 10:17 PM.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    The Left Coast of the USA
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Kubuntu

    Re: Square Root of RAM for swap space formula

    No. I won't rethink it, but I did reread it more carefully.

    Not rounded up "by" a power of two as I had read it, in which case it's back to 100.

    Rounded up "to" a power of two is a different matter, i which case it is 16.

    Misreading, not Math.
    Please read The Forum Rules and The Forum Posting Guidelines

    A thing discovered and kept to oneself must be discovered time and again by others. A thing discovered and shared with others need be discovered only the once.
    This universe is crazy. I'm going back to my own.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    Re: Square Root of RAM for swap space formula

    Quote Originally Posted by Dreamer Fithp Apprentice View Post

    OP seems intent on getting an answer - he's given up on us and gone on to ask elsewhere:
    http://wyldeplayground.net/square-root-of-ram-for-swap-space-formula/
    Not that it actually matters, but the site you linked to is just another site to scrapes data from multiple sources and uses it to get hits.

    So far the OP has only posted here.

    As far as using a specific formula for setting the amount of swap in use, I usually stick to the default which is twice the RAM unless I have an ungodly amount of RAM and then it is 1 X the amount of RAM, like oldfred mentioned.
    Come to #ubuntuforums! We have cookies! | Basic Ubuntu Security Guide

    Tomorrow's an illusion and yesterday's a dream, today is a solution...

Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •