Results 1 to 8 of 8

Thread: a partition-logic for a new installation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Beans
    78

    a partition-logic for a new installation

    want to do a fresh install of opensuse 13.1

    therefore i want to erase all the partition-logic and create a new one


    what about a three folded partition-logic

    with root , swap and home

    is this useful:


    Code:
    ~> lsblk
    NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
    sda 8:0 0 465,8G 0 disk
    ├─sda1 8:1 0 156M 0 part /boot/efi
    ├─sda2 8:2 0 400M 0 part /boot
    └─sda3 8:3 0 465,2G 0 part
    └─cr_ata-ST500LT012-xxx_xxx-part3 254:0 0 465,2G 0 crypt
    ├─system-swap 254:1 0 2G 0 lvm [SWAP]
    ├─system-root 254:2 0 40G 0 lvm /
    └─system-home 254:3 0 423,2G 0 lvm /home

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Squidbilly-Land
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu Mate 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: a partition-logic for a new installation

    Why use LVM at all? There are reasons, but you haven't articulated any worth the extra complexity. Spanning file systems across different storage can lead to issues. Encryption can work - but getting the Ubuntu installer to honor non-default partitioning with encryption is non-trivial. I've tried.

    I don't have an EFI box and run many systems with just 1 partition - these are virtual machines with well-known requirements for disk, ram, cpu, and networking. No swap at all. Desktops always, always, always need swap. On a physical machine, I do this:

    * /boot - 800MB - 500MB is probably fine, but watch that it doesn't get full. Less can lead to issues with too many kernels and running out of space mid-upgrade sucks. http://blog.jdpfu.com/2013/02/23/cle...rnels-from-apt
    * / - 20G (or so). Enough for programs - 20G is really overkill unless you want to try 20 different GUIs and never clean the unused versions/programs up.
    * /var .... enough for the needed use on the machine. A single website might need 1G, but virtual machine servers probably need 1TB or more. Really just depends.
    * /home - for a desktop with just me - 5G. I don't keep media files there. This is a ton of storage for my perl development and documents. Java and C/C++ programmers might want 30-40G for all the compiled stuff and libraries. Python, perl, php, Ruby ... 5-10G is fine even if you use rvm or perlbrew. I actually do perl development on a desktop (my primary desktop) running inside a virtual machine. Here's the storage for that box:
    Code:
    $ df -h
    Filesystem      Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
    /dev/vda1        14G   11G  1.6G  88% /
    $ swapon -s
    Filename                                Type            Size    Used    Priority
    /dev/vda5                               partition       1591292 91248   -1
    Yes - it really is 14G for everything.

    * /D/* ----- this is where I mount other storage as needed. Most systems get NFS storage from other machines. Only a few machine have extra disks added to be used as network storage for all the others. Use autofs, to only mount storage when needed, which is great for USB storage, not just NFS stuff. /D/T (TV), /D/V (home videos), /D/Music, /D/M (movies) .... you get the idea.

    Everything needs to be backed up, so limiting the storage available to a system really is a management tool to limit the amount of backup storage required. For the 30 systems here, daily, versioned, backups (60-120 days each) need about 500G of storage. Media backups are different - can't keep versioned backups for all that stuff - too large.

    My storage design is about backups, disaster recovery, and system upgrades. The goal is to minimize trouble in the future and to have a way to recover after logical or physical issues. We talk about backups all the time, but that really is just 10% of it. A backup that cannot be restored is completely worthless. Practice restoring, please. Oh - and if you use encryption - backups are 100x more important. When bad things happen to encrypted disks, the only real solution is to restore.

    Swap sizes depend on workload and whether you hibernate. For desktops, 4G of swap seems a reasonable amount or 1.1x the amount of RAM if you hibernate (whichever is larger). I've found that 2G of swap on a 2G RAM netbook desktop is just a little too small. The system crashed with a few browser tabs opened. Going to 4G swap made all those crashes stop. Swap slows down the system so we get a feeling that RAM is being over-committed and can free some resources. With SSDs, it takes more RAM swap to notice the slowdown, at least for me.

    Anyway - hope all this helps.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    UK
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 18.04 Bionic Beaver

    Re: a partition-logic for a new installation

    Support, not a Cafe thread.

    Thread moved to openSUSE and SUSE Linux Enterprise.
    Ubuntu 16.04 Desktop Guide - Ubuntu 18.04 Desktop Guide - Forum Guide to BBCode - Using BBCode code tags - IRC #ubuntuforums

    Member: Not Canonical Team

    Please do not PM me about your forum account unless you have been asked to. The correct place to contact an admin about your account is here.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Beans
    78

    how to set up this partition-logic with a three folded sheme; root swap home ;)

    hello dear ubuntulinux-experts,

    i am currently planning a new (totally new and fresh installation of opensuse linux version 13.2

    therefore i want to create new partitons on linux.

    by the way - how do you like this idea: a three folded partition

    what about this sheme:

    to create a file structure like so
    Code:
    ~> lsblk
    NAME MAJ:MIN RM SIZE RO TYPE MOUNTPOINT
    sda 8:0 0 465,8G 0 disk
    ├─sda1 8:1 0 156M 0 part /boot/efi
    ├─sda2 8:2 0 400M 0 part /boot
    └─sda3 8:3 0 465,2G 0 part
    └─cr_ata-ST500LT012-xxx_xxx-part3 254:0 0 465,2G 0 crypt
    ├─system-swap 254:1 0 2G 0 lvm [SWAP]
    ├─system-root 254:2 0 40G 0 lvm /
    └─system-home 254:3 0 423,2G 0 lvm /home
    can i create this with gparted

    well - how to do that?

    .update: to clear up all the things in this

    how is this being done

    Code:
    └─cr_ata-ST500LT012-xxx_xxx-part3 254:0 0 465,2G 0 crypt
    ├─system-swap 254:1 0 2G 0 lvm [SWAP]
    ├─system-root 254:2 0 40G 0 lvm /
    └─system-home 254:3 0 423,2G 0 lvm /home

    note: i want to do this with gparted!

    this line looks interesting. ....
    Code:
    └─cr_ata-ST500LT012-xxx_xxx-part3 254:0 0 465,2G 0 crypt
    how to do this with gparted

    many thanks for any and all help

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Squidbilly-Land
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu Mate 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: how to set up this partition-logic with a three folded sheme; root swap home ;)

    You asked this already in another thread. And I responded there.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Beans
    78

    Re: a partition-logic for a new installation

    hello you both

    many many thanks for your help and all the hints. great thing



    Why use LVM at all? There are reasons, but you haven't articulated any worth the extra complexity. Spanning file systems across different storage can lead to issues. Encryption can work - but getting the Ubuntu installer to honor non-default partitioning with encryption is non-trivial. I've tried.
    good ideas - food for thougth


    many many thanks

    . one last question though

    just to understand this a bit more.
    how is this being done

    Code:
    └─cr_ata-ST500LT012-xxx_xxx-part3 254:0 0 465,2G 0 crypt
    ├─system-swap 254:1 0 2G 0 lvm [SWAP]
    ├─system-root 254:2 0 40G 0 lvm /
    └─system-home 254:3 0 423,2G 0 lvm /home

    note: i want to do this with gparted!

    this line looks interesting. ....
    Code:
    └─cr_ata-ST500LT012-xxx_xxx-part3 254:0 0 465,2G 0 crypt
    what is the deeper sense of this line. And finally: how to do this with gparted?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SW Forida
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu

    Re: a partition-logic for a new installation

    Threads merged, please do not create duplicate threads with same issue.
    We all are volunteers, so need to see other posts so we do not duplicate effort.

    Does OpenSuse let you install to partitions or is its only install the LVM type install?
    Gparted does not work on LVM partitions.

    LVM - Logical Volume Management.
    Advantages/Disadvantages LVM Post #9
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.p...45#post9917145
    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Lvm
    https://help.ubuntu.com/community/UbuntuDesktopLVM
    2014_02_22_Preparing Logical Volumes For Ubuntu Installations
    http://members.iinet.net/~herman546/...allations.html
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Beans
    78

    Re: a partition-logic for a new installation

    hello again

    well since the line cr_ata... is the line which shows your CD/DVD drive.

    hmm gparted should be fairly self-explanatory -lots of folks all over the planet use it.
    on the other handside we just could use fdisk, bit it is a CLI-tool, so maybe this is just a bit more difficult


    well the above mentioned line is the luks-container-line

    he takes over the encryption of all that is not root

    can i ceate all the above mentioned things with a cli-tool.
    hmm - guess gparted is pretty easy - easier than other tools
    Last edited by dilbert_one; December 29th, 2014 at 11:01 PM.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •