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Thread: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

  1. #11
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    Re: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

    I woudn't play with the heat sink directly if you're unsure what you're doing - it's easy to mess up the thermal conductivity if you don't get it right. Start with a good cleaning, certainly (don't use WD40, though - will eat plastics and cause short circuits) - then see how it runs. But you really should confirm whether it's just under Linux that you have this problem before you go much further than that and risk permanent damage to your laptop by taking it apart. Odds are that it really is the hardware needing attention, but you should always try to confirm that before performing open heart surgery on it.

    I'd also try to find out if you can get a true CPU temperature reading under Windows. If you can get one there, but not under Linux then you risk damage to your laptop due to Linux mismanaging your fan because it doesn't know the true CPU temperature. You might still be able to get away with it like that if you stay on top of keeping an unobstructed air flow for your laptop, but if that's what you wind up doing then remember to keep an eye on the temperature for the long haul. Also realize that running hot like that will shorten both the CPU's and the battery's lifetimes (and potentially any other nearby heat-sensitive/expanding parts such as the hard drive).

    Whatever you do, I wish you luck.
    Last edited by Sanctimonious_Ape; August 16th, 2014 at 05:45 AM.

  2. #12
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    What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    I think my laptop, a Toshiba Satellite L25 S1216 is overheating. It shuts off without warning. It is 8 1/2 years old and has never been cleaned.

    In lm-sensors I get a readout of:

    Every 2.0s: sensors Fri Aug 15 22:54:03 2014

    acpitz-virtual-0
    Adapter: Virtual device
    temp1: +77.0°C (crit = +110.0°C)

    QUESTION: is this a high temperature? What does this temperature mean?

    Any other comments would be welcomed.

    Thanks,

    R.

  3. #13
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    Yes your temp is a little high.
    I would peg a normal temp as half that, normally.

    the temp1 most likely is the cpu temp, it is probably the best comment that the module used can give you.
    When you configured sensors, it probed the system and loaded the best modules for it, or at least what it deemed to be the best modules for it.
    The temp1 output is just how that particular module writes it.
    If that makes sense...
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  4. #14
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    Re: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Sanctimonious_Ape View Post
    According to the specs on Toshiba's site for your laptop, you only have a single core CPU so that's fine (Toshiba apparently skimped on a zoned temp sensor [ed: I was probably wrong about this, see next message], but I don't know how useful that'd really be anyway - mine's consistently lower than the CPU temp by a handful of degrees). What I find odd is the "Crit" temp is 10°C above Intel's own specs for that CPU (thermal stuff is at the end) which say the design max is 100°C and that the CPU will shut down (presumably just stop working entirely) at 125°C.

    Kinda suprised even at those specs because 100°C is the boiling point of water and extremely hot - there must be some significant cooling going on in that laptop to make it usable on, well... a lap top. Mine is similarly spec'd to yours (slightly older, I think), but uses an AMD CPU and it usually tops out at 73°C CPU temp when going full bore.

    Regardless, if you continue having heat-related shutdown issues, maybe your laptop's heat sink isn't making as good a connection as it used to (due to being tossed around, maybe) or perhaps the fan on the heat sink needs some attention. There's plenty of info on the web about thermal paste, heat sinks, etc. or get a decent repair shop to check it for you. I've even seen people who expanded their laptop's thermal dissipation using thermal pads and aluminum foil, but you've really gotta know what you're doing there or you'll likely short something out and cause bigger problems.
    I find this kinda interesting, I must admit.

    I'm running PSensor myself. I have an elderly Compaq Presario desktop PC (okay, LOTS more space inside to move air around, I know)... It's running a single core AMD Athlon 64 (to my mind, one of the very best of the older single-core CPUs).

    Now, curiously I have not one, but three temp readouts. And that's in addition to the hard drive readout, and the CPU load; there's one other, as well, but I can't check it at the moment, as I'm writing this in Mint 17. (I currently have half-a-dozen different distros on here, and PSensor is installed in Ubuntu 14.04, and Zorin's Core OS 9...)

    If the CPU gets much above 40C, I start getting worried; that indicates some serious work is going on, coupled with CPU load usually in excess of 95% for a while.Normally, she runs somewhere in the region of 28-30C; probably sounds ridiculously low to some of you!

    I've always run temp monitoring software of some kind, ever since I had XP on an old Dell Inspiron 1100 laptop....that thing used to regularly pull temps of 80C+, and it used to FRIGHTEN me..!

    When the Compaq was running XP, up till May this year, I ran HWMonitor. The temps used to tally consistently with the temps that I experience now, so I'm guessing it may not be the OS that may not detect the true temp, but it might be down to the piece of individual software that you decide to use. I tried many temp monitor programs under Windows, and found by experimentation that HWMonitor was the most accurate out of all of them.


    Regards,

    Mike.
    Last edited by Mike_Walsh; August 16th, 2014 at 02:39 PM.
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  5. #15
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    Thanks deadflowr,

    I took apart the PC, cleaned out the fan, lubricated the fan, removed and put new thermal paste between the cooling fin and CPU, GPU,etc. It is running cooler and quieter now, temp1 is about 51-58 now.

    R.

  6. #16
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    Seems you got it down, but seems a bit high. What is your Processor and are you overclocking? I'm just curious.

    Nevermind. Googled it and seems your temp is normal for that config. Interesting.
    Last edited by JDorfler; August 19th, 2014 at 05:19 AM. Reason: Grammar
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  7. #17
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    Re: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike_Walsh View Post
    Now, curiously I have not one, but three temp readouts.
    Might be the GPU (graphics chip - particularly if the video's integrated on the motherboard), the "Northbridge, and/or the Southbridge chips. Without specifics regarding your rig, it's impossible for me to research (and I'm sure you could research it yourself if you cared enough to).

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike_Walsh View Post
    If the CPU gets much above 40C, I start getting worried; that indicates some serious work is going on, coupled with CPU load usually in excess of 95% for a while.Normally, she runs somewhere in the region of 28-30C; probably sounds ridiculously low to some of you!
    My laptop is already in the mid-30s by the time it boots up and I log in (Psensor starts automatically). Unfortunately, I don't know what temps it ran at when it was new. I looked up my processor and couldn't find a nice detailed spec sheet like the Intel one. I found info stating max temps anywhere from 69°C (AMD's own site, but a very generic page that didn't seem specific to my processor - plus that exact number had been listed elsewhere as a desktop case max temp, not mobile CPU) on up to 90°C.

    This made me think my laptop running up into the low 70s might be dangerously close to overheating as well, so I went ahead and took the case apart (what a PITA on a laptop) and made liberal use of a can of compressed air. I didn't lubricate the fan or do anything else and already my max temp dropped by over 10°C. I tested this by running two YouTube playlists (sound muted) in two tabs simultaneously (YT always sucks up the processor time on my laptop) for over an hour, never exceeded 62°C and took significantly longer to ramp up to the top temperature. After that I let it idle for ten minutes and it leveled out at 40°C, whereas before idle was usually in the high 40s range.

    NOTE: I am NOT responsible for anything that happens should you attempt to follow the suggestions I give below. Continuing to read this post constitutes your acceptance of these terms. Just covering my...

    This experience suggests to me that if you have any uncertainty about how warm your CPU is running, then you should go ahead and clean your machine. Pick up a can of compressed air from your local office supply store for between $5-10. If you're not up for taking apart your laptop, you can still improve things a bit. Unplug everything from your laptop and remove its battery so it doesn't turn on even by accident. Be sure to keep the can upright while spraying to minimize any chemical liquids that might come out (this is usually stated on the can itself -- you should most definitely read the instructions on the can thoroughly before beginning this procedure).

    Blow the compressed air in short bursts through any and all vents near the one where the hot air is blown out (as well as that vent itself) - usually it's near a corner, so you'll want to do vents on both sides that make up the corner (as well as possibly underneath). Watch for where the dust comes out to get an idea whether you're getting all the vents involved. Rotate through the various vents repeatedly and get the entire length of the vent, not just from one spot. Shoot the air from different directions (again while still keeping the can upright) at the vent. If you can see the fan itself through any of the vents, try to make sure you've cleaned it off as best you can. When it doesn't appear you're getting much more dust out, then let the laptop sit for a while (preferably overnight) before reattaching anything so the chemical liquids that might have escaped the compressed air can and gotten into the machine have a chance to evaporate before power can be applied and potentially short-circuit something. Might even be good to prop your laptop up on an angle while letting it "dry" so the liquid that might have gotten in there runs out the vents.

    To be honest, I kept my can upright and didn't wait very long before reconnecting things. However, if you want to try to ensure that you have no problems then you should certainly take as many precautions -- such as those described above -- as you can. Whatever you do, though - don't let your laptop overheat and potentially cause a fire (although most CPUs have a built-in cutoff to prevent this as the original poster described, you should assume the worst possibility of that mechanism potentially failing for whatever reason).

    Good luck, all. I'm glad I read this thread and thought to look at my own PC for similar issues.

  8. #18
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    Yeah, I'm thinking higher temps are the norm for larger process dies - mine's 90nm and runs in a similar range. As processor dies were shrunk (can't believe how small they've gotten - 14nm for the new Broadwell chips!!), they probably needed to reduce the heat generated to keep them reliable. Or maybe the reduced temperatures are a byproduct of lower power requirements. Or both. What do I know about processor design?

  9. #19
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    Re: Temperature monitoring of overheating PC

    I just tried psensor myself, and I have a temp1 at the top as well. When psensor started (I ran it from a terminal) it gave an error about unable to retrieve nvidia information (it's an Intel GPU), so I can only assume as well that temp1 must be the GPU (I currently have no disks - just running off a SD card until a disk gets here Wednesday), so that's pretty much all that's left (Dell laptop).

    As a side note/question/hopefully provide useful information for others reading/will read this thread:

    What are the "normal" temps for things like CPU's? This laptop has Intel Core 2 Duo and it's showing both cpu's in the upper 40's (in Celsius), with a max in the very low 50's.

    What are the "normal" ranges on things like hard disks, SSD's, etc.?

    Thanks

  10. #20
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    Re: What does temp1 in lm-sensors mean?

    Isn't the same as another thread you have on this? I didn't think we were supposed to open more than 1 thread for the same problem. You may want to ask if they can be merged somehow so you (and others) don't have to watch 2 seperate threads for the same thing.

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