Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Beans
    8

    Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    Want an Ubuntu expert to verify some assumptions before I attempt to install. I am currently using Windows XP. With support for XP ending I do not want to continue using it. Instead of going to the expense in both time and money of upgrade Windows I am looking at Ubuntu. I have an old PC (Pentium 4) with XP on disk A (80 GB). Disk B (320 GB) has 80 GB free at the beginning and the rest is used for data. I want to install Ubuntu on disk B, and then when I am sure I can do everything I need to do on Ubuntu replace disk A with a new larger disk for additional data storage. Questions:

    1: Is 80 GB enough for Ubuntu 12.04 and swap?
    2: With 4 GB memory is 8 GB the correct swap size (read swap should be 2 times memory)?
    3: Am I correct in assuming that putting the dual-boot on B will allow me to remove disk A with no problems?
    4: I read that Ubuntu can only read NTFS. I have some old USB drives formatted in FAT32 and some old backup info on floppies (from before USB drives). Do I have to convert all that to NTFS before I delete Windows?
    5: Will WINE allow me to run any Windows utility I can not find a replacement for? Would that fix item 4?

    Any suggestions would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    United Kingdom
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Lubuntu Development Release

    Re: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    I wouldn't call myself an expert (all volunteers here!), but in answer to your questions:

    1. Yes, you won't use very much of that at all.
    2. No, that's a rule of thumb. 4GB RAM is more than enough, so 8GB of swap will probably be overkill. 2GB in my experience is more than sufficient for all installations.
    3. Yes, if you install Ubuntu on disk B, it won't touch disk A at all and will just see it like any other drive you plug in.
    4. No, Ubuntu can read FAT as well. I have previously had issues with floppies not mounting automatically, but it is perfectly possible to do it manually.
    5. WINE is not a 'magic bullet': it runs some (I would be tempted to say most) programs perfectly, some imperfectly, and some not at all. Check out http://appdb.winehq.org/


    However, I would not recommend Ubuntu for a Pentium IV, I imagine that the interface will be too much for the machine. I would suggest Xubuntu (light) or Lubuntu (lightest) instead, which are identical to Ubuntu but come with a lighter interface.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Location
    Windsor, Ontario, Canada
    Beans
    88
    Distro
    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    1) 80GB is plenty! I have my installation on a 10GB partition.
    2) If you have 4GB of RAM I cannot see the old 2:1 ratio of swap to RAM being anywhere near necessary. "Should" is used loosely when determining how much swap you need.
    3) As long as you haven't set your installation to use disk A for anything important (ie. your "/" partition, "/home" or swap) you ought to be fine.
    4) My Ubuntu installation has no issues writing to NTFS. I think you'd want the "ntfs-utils" package.
    5) WINE is hit and miss. Their web site has a pretty comprehensive list of what does and does not work.

    I note the post above mine recommends against using the full Ubuntu experience with a P4. I have used Ubuntu on a P4 and it has worked, but I wouldn't call it "snappy". When installing for others with P4 systems I usually install the Gnome fallback interface ("gnome-session-fallback"?) Xubuntu'd be a great alternative.
    Last edited by uc50_ic4more; August 4th, 2013 at 11:56 PM.
    --
    uc50_ic4more

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Beans
    6,949

    Re: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    Just a couple of points that I don't think anyone has mentioned yet

    2) if you plan on hibernating the system, you need at least as much swap as physical RAM i.e. 4GB (even though the system may rarely benefit from that much swap space while running)

    3) the installer may default to installing the grub boot loader on your A disk - in which case the system will become unbootable if you subsequently remove that disk (although that situation would be repairable, using a live CD or USB to reinstall grub to disk B)

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Beans
    6

    Re: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    Quote Originally Posted by steeldriver View Post
    3) the installer may default to installing the grub boot loader on your A disk - in which case the system will become unbootable if you subsequently remove that disk (although that situation would be repairable, using a live CD or USB to reinstall grub to disk B)
    I really think that part of the installer should be much more obvious, clearer, warning lights etc. I have rendered a machine unusable because I didn't pay close enough attention to the grub installer selection that is automatically populated. maxws43, just be careful during install at this step: http://pix.toile-libre.org/upload/or...1349879961.png. You will need to select "Something else" and select the drive manually.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SW Forida
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    Good points by all above. And you do have to use the something else option to get the choice to install the grub2 boot loader to sdb. Otherwise with all the auto install options it installs the boot loader to sda. Some suggest just disconnecting drive if you are willing to do that.

    Not too many dual drive install examples, a couple of older ones, but install process is essentially the same across all recent versions if in BIOS mode not the new UEFI mode.
    Install to external drive. Also any second drive.
    Installer version has not changed much so still a good guide except I do not recommend the separate /boot for most systems. Older systems may need it. And some with very large / (root) partitions. BIOS/MBR not for UEFI
    http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/07/23...2-hard-drives/
    Installing Ubuntu in Hard Disk Two (or more) internal or external Lots of detail - now alternative (text based) installer which is not available on newest versions.
    Different versions have slight difference in install screens but process is the same. And gui versions are not really a lot different.
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~herman546/p24.html
    p24/041.png Shows combo box to select where to install the grub2 boot loader.
    Where Do You Want To Install GNU/GRUB boot loader?
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~herman546/p24/041.png
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    London, England
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu Development Release

    Re: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    What graphic adapter do you have? I have seen a massive improvement in running Ubuntu by putting in a high specified graphic card. People mention the CPU & the RAM but I think that the power of the graphic adapter and the amount of memory it has is just as important to how well an OS appears to run.

    Regards.
    It is a machine. It is more stupid than we are. It will not stop us from doing stupid things.
    Ubuntu user #33,200. Linux user #530,530


  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Beans
    8

    Re: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    Quote Originally Posted by oldfred View Post
    Good points by all above. And you do have to use the something else option to get the choice to install the grub2 boot loader to sdb. Otherwise with all the auto install options it installs the boot loader to sda. Some suggest just disconnecting drive if you are willing to do that.

    Not too many dual drive install examples, a couple of older ones, but install process is essentially the same across all recent versions if in BIOS mode not the new UEFI mode.
    Install to external drive. Also any second drive.
    Installer version has not changed much so still a good guide except I do not recommend the separate /boot for most systems. Older systems may need it. And some with very large / (root) partitions. BIOS/MBR not for UEFI
    http://www.linuxbsdos.com/2012/07/23...2-hard-drives/
    Installing Ubuntu in Hard Disk Two (or more) internal or external Lots of detail - now alternative (text based) installer which is not available on newest versions.
    Different versions have slight difference in install screens but process is the same. And gui versions are not really a lot different.
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~herman546/p24.html
    p24/041.png Shows combo box to select where to install the grub2 boot loader.
    Where Do You Want To Install GNU/GRUB boot loader?
    http://members.iinet.net.au/~herman546/p24/041.png
    Oldfred, thanks for the information. Looking at the instructions they start by deleting everything from sdb. My sdb has an empty 80GB primary partition and then a 240 GB extended partition which is 2/3 full of data. Do I have to delete the extended partition or can I split the 80 GB for system and swap? (The data is all backed up except for a 30GB Window system backup, but a reload would be lengthy.) That would put the swap in a primary versus a logical partition. Is that OK?

    I think the best place for the boot loader is sdb. Then when I am ready to delete Windows I should have no problem booting directly to Ubuntu. Or am I missing something?

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SW Forida
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    If you use gparted in advance or manually partition sdb, and have enough room for / (root) about 25GB suggested but can be 10 to 25GB and swap at 2GB just to have some. Since you have other data partitions you may not need the separate /home that we sometimes suggest.

    I always try to make the install to a drive have boot loader and all necessary system folders so that drive can boot without any other drive. If other drive fails entry in fstab for a data partition may give an error but system will boot. If boot loader is on one drive and system on another you need both drives to alway work to boot. Of course having a live installer or other Linux repair flash drives is also a good idea.
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Beans
    3

    Re: Want expert to verify assumptions before installation

    Do you recommend disk paritioning before installation or the automatic partitioning during installation is enough to use Ubuntu without any problem?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •