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Thread: New User Questions

  1. #11
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    Re: New User Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by RoosterHam View Post
    If you are going into IT, I would certainly recommend learning Linux (and if you have the time some Unixes). The fact is that Windows has never been the dominant player in critical computing. Before Windows, before MS-DOS, there was Unix. By the time powerful computers shrunk down from filling a room for one system to having the same power in the size of a suitcase and able to be stacked on top of each other, Unix had changed the world and proven the most stable and useful OS. But it was expensive, and to some extent too difficult to use for non-technical people. So people came up with cheaper systems like MS-DOS, which were still difficult to use for non-technical people.

    Technical people simply couldn't afford the powerful Unixes, so Linus Torvalds began a project to bring a Unix to his PC. With alot of issues of licensing and piracy, the philosophy of the GNU project (check that out to) enabled Linus's project to become an open source Unix-like. It acted very much like a Unix, dressed like a unix, talked like a unix, lived in the same areas as unix, but wasn't blood related.

    Windows was born for non-tech people to have pretty pictures on a monitor (95,98,me, and all home editions), and MS tried to compete with the Unix and Unix-likes that were being used where power and stability were required (windows NT, windows 2000 pro/server, 2003 server, 2008 server, etc) and because everyone was seeing windows on their desktops, MS had half their advertising done for them.

    Now we have Linux, we have Mac OSX which is a unix, we have android which is linux based, apple iOS which is also unix. Huge companies like IBM put as much, if not more, effort behind Linux than their own Unixes.

    If your interest in IT is simply supporting some home or office desktops, you could just leave it at learning windows. If you intend to go into system/network administration, web or application development, any sort of large deployment or critical deployment occupation, learning Linux and how similar it is to Unix would truly open an entire world to you.

    The good thing about Linux is that it was born online, so you can learn an incredible amount online. Howtos, youtube videos, podcasts, wikis, it's all out there. Check out Debian/Ubuntu documentation, FreeBSD documentation, and so forth. they all have wikis that google will promptly guide you to.

    I'll also advise you to check out the online podcasting services of Jupiter Broadcasting at http://www.jupiterbroadcasting.com/ (Linux Action Show and TechSNAP) and TWiT at http://twit.tv/

    2. Have you made sure that file sharing is configured on your windows machine?


    Thank you for your help. One thing I have noticed on this forum compared to various Windows or Mac forums is nobody acts like they are better than anybody else. Whether it is just the forums I am looking at or if that's how people think they are on those I don't know, I have browsed many other threads on this site and people seem like they are very willing to help. I have been told on other sites I'm stupid and if I don't already know the answer to the question I am asking I shouldn't be on there. Bottom line is I'm asking because I don't know, no matter what the question is. I have a desire and openness to learn so I can better myself for the future, so far on this site people seem very willing to help.

    Just out of curiosity where did you learn all that? Just from being around I have always heard people say Mac is for 'dumb and old people', Windows is for 'techies and people who know how to use a computer' and Linux is too hard for anybody to use. Kind of like Windows 8, a majority, not all, people who complain about it are people who have never used it. So far Linux seems very straightforward to me, yes I am a tech person but the stuff I am wanting to learn is not things a basic user would need to know.

    So what do corporate companies use for mobile devices? I have seen how a lot are switching to iPhone, I myself have an iPhone 5, it's nothing special but it's a phone and simply works all the time. Why don't companies go with Windows Phones or Android tablets?

    My interest in IT is the corporate world, being in the big corporate companies who thrive on technology, not a local PC shop fixing computers that come in. I'm not saying that that area isn't important but my big interest is corporate. Right now with being in my last semester of college I do setup home networks, computers, printers and so on for people who need stuff done in their homes, not big money making stuff but things to boost my experience.

    Thank you, I will check those sites out. Is there any good 'useful' Linux books or magazine subscriptions that actually have information that is helpful and not totally opinionated?

    As far as I know file sharing is setup on my Windows machines, I have no problem sharing from Windows to Windows or Windows to Ubuntu, my problem is only in Ubuntu to Windows.

    Going off your response from last night and from the one quoted I found these articles: 50 Places and Google. I find them both very interesting, especially the one about who all has switched to Linux. The Google one I think they could be onto something if they go about it the right way, Windows 8 has caused computer prices to go skyhigh and if Google could make a desktop OS that isn't only internet based but yet still provide it with decent quality and lower prices they could be onto something. Just curious on your thoughts or any others....
    Last edited by thatotherdude24; March 14th, 2013 at 05:17 AM.

  2. #12
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    Re: New User Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by RoosterHam View Post
    so this MCE CallerID seems like an addon to WinMCE for some kind of telephony gateway. Is this correct?

    If I'm correct, I would recommend investigating asterisk PBX and it's use in this role and extension for the CallerID function...

    What it does is, I have a modem in my desktop PC that is connected to a phone jack. It runs the server software and I connect all my client PCs and WinMCE to it and that allows the Caller ID to show up on all client computers and WinMCE.

    I have a Centon Infinity Quad Tuner with a cablecard in it so I can record channels that I need a cable box for and I have only every been told that it will work with Windows Media Center. I can live record and/or watch live TV or recorded TV and stream it to any Xbox in the house. Is there another way to do this?
    Last edited by thatotherdude24; March 14th, 2013 at 05:22 AM.

  3. #13
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: New User Questions

    The community that uses and develops Linux and other open source software is, for the most part, one of the most friendly and helpful internet communities around. Some people are not so helpful, but I know that I've made a fool of myself many times and I've never been flamed for it. To most of us, it's all about sharing knowledge with each other while getting knowledge from others and by trying things out.

    I learned alot of what I know from the ubuntu and debian howto sites and wikis, as well as wikipedia. Magazines that I have used to learn from are "Linux Journal">http://www.linuxjournal.com/ and "Hackin9" and books include "Linux for dummies" and all Linux related books from O'Reilly > http://oreilly.com

    The preference for IPhones, that I'm seeing in corporations also, seems to be mainly for uniformity (one ios, fairly compatible between all devices) and more consistency. By that I mean that phone companies can offer an android range from the same manufacturer, but the differences between the androids means the support desk has to be more knowledgeable, then the provider might or might not change their prefered range, and what is that going to mean to a company with a contract for 100 to 4000 mobile devices? Is their provider going to take care of them? Or are they going to say it's not their issue, talk to the manufacturer? What comes with the range? How proven are all of these devices? So to a corporation, they take the best deal that their chosen provider, or the best deal all the providers they trust, can present to them. They'll try to pick devices with the longest good record, that does everything they want and more, for the cheapest.

    I did a similar thing to start in IT. I supported friends, friends-of-friends, family, friends-of-family, most often recovering files and replacing hard drives in laptops that had terrible overheating problems and fixing up laboured Pentium 4 machines that people treated like and expected to keep up with multi-core 64bit systems. Now I'm lucky enough to be part of a Unified Communications solutions company, mainly on the network infrastructure side.

    Before I go on, I have to be honest, I am lost as to suggesting a way of getting the same result for your callerID thing. I have a bit of experience with IP telephony, but mainly taking phone lines for a large corporation off TDM lines, recording (with Digium's opensource Asterisk) the necessary lines while passing the phone exchange task on to a different Linux based PABX solution (Avaya). But pulling off of the Plain Old Telephone System, and distributing data to Windows platforms is a little out of my knowlege.

    But that aside...
    The tuner card you have seems to be a bit of a hot subject. I simply googled it and "linux support" and found dozens of flame wars about whether Linux supports it. > http://forum.linuxmce.org/index.php?topic=8852.20;wap2 MythTV seems to support it and there's instructions here > http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/Ceton_InfiniTV_4

    MythTV is great. You can tune, record, stream, and probably make a nice batch of pancakes, with all your media and entertainment connections. IPTV, saved media files, analogue TV and cable TV. You can stream it to all your PCs and so forth, but check the links below to see how you can use it and set it up. I don't use it currently, but I plan to when I get the freedom of networking my home properly.
    http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/MythTV-HOWTO
    http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/Main_Page
    http://www.mythtv.org/
    I dream of a world where our lives can remain private, and our technology can remain open to all.

  4. #14
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    4

    Re: New User Questions

    Am new to the forum can some one help me to know what is the common difference in ubuntu and os and linux

  5. #15
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    Re: New User Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by thatotherdude24 View Post

    1. I use Thunderbird to connect my Gmail account to. When I delete my email in Thunderbird it sends it to my 'all mail' folder in Gmail, how do I set it so it would go to my trash?

    Open Thunderbird
    EDIT menu----->Account Settings-----> [Select your account on the left] ----------> Server Settings------> "When I delete a message..."-------> [Choose desired location (e.g. Trash, Gmail Trash, etc)]

    Quote Originally Posted by thatotherdude24 View Post
    4. Just a general curiousty question.....is Linux used very much in the corporate world?


    50 Places Linux is Running That You Might Not Expect
    Last edited by ubuntu27; March 15th, 2013 at 06:33 AM.

  6. #16
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    Re: New User Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaspro View Post
    Am new to the forum can some one help me to know what is the common difference in ubuntu and os and linux
    ubutnu OS is software packages (programmes and such) + linux kernel (core). Ubutnu is one of many linux distributions. Other linux distributions are for example Red Hat, Debian, Linux Mint, Puppy Linux, Gentoo, Slackware, Arch linux.... and many others.
    Easy to understand Ubuntu manual with lots of pics: http://ubuntu-manual.org/
    Do i need antivirus/firewall in linux?
    User friendly disk backup: Redobackup

  7. #17
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    Re: New User Questions

    Free Linux magazine, you can also download all the back issues.
    http://fullcirclemagazine.org/

  8. #18
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    Re: New User Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Vaspro View Post
    Am new to the forum can some one help me to know what is the common difference in ubuntu and os and linux
    To expand on mastablasta's excellent response:

    "An operating system (OS) is a collection of software that manages computer hardware resources and provides common services for computer programs. The operating system is a vital component of the system software in a computer system. Application programs usually require an operating system to function."..."Examples of popular modern operating systems include Android, BSD, iOS, Linux, Mac OS X, Microsoft Windows,[3] Windows Phone, and IBM z/OS. All these, except Windows and z/OS, share roots in UNIX."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operating_system

    "Linux (Listeni/ˈlɪnəks/ LIN-əks[6][7] or /ˈlɪnʊks/ LIN-uuks)[8][9][10] is a Unix-like computer operating system assembled under the model of free and open source software development and distribution. The defining component of Linux is the Linux kernel, an operating system kernel first released 5 October 1991 by Linus Torvalds.[11][12]"..."Some popular mainstream Linux distributions include Debian (and its derivatives such as Ubuntu and Linux Mint), Red Hat Enterprise Linux (and its derivatives such as Fedora and CentOS), Mandriva/Mageia, openSUSE (and its commercial derivative SUSE Linux Enterprise Server), and Arch Linux."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux
    System76 Serval Pro 7: Ubuntu 16.04; Dell Latitude D800: Lubuntu 16.04; Zotac Z-Box ID45: LinHES 8.4.3

  9. #19
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    Re: New User Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by RoosterHam View Post
    The community that uses and develops Linux and other open source software is, for the most part, one of the most friendly and helpful internet communities around. Some people are not so helpful, but I know that I've made a fool of myself many times and I've never been flamed for it. To most of us, it's all about sharing knowledge with each other while getting knowledge from others and by trying things out.

    I learned alot of what I know from the ubuntu and debian howto sites and wikis, as well as wikipedia. Magazines that I have used to learn from are "Linux Journal">http://www.linuxjournal.com/ and "Hackin9" and books include "Linux for dummies" and all Linux related books from O'Reilly > http://oreilly.com

    The preference for IPhones, that I'm seeing in corporations also, seems to be mainly for uniformity (one ios, fairly compatible between all devices) and more consistency. By that I mean that phone companies can offer an android range from the same manufacturer, but the differences between the androids means the support desk has to be more knowledgeable, then the provider might or might not change their prefered range, and what is that going to mean to a company with a contract for 100 to 4000 mobile devices? Is their provider going to take care of them? Or are they going to say it's not their issue, talk to the manufacturer? What comes with the range? How proven are all of these devices? So to a corporation, they take the best deal that their chosen provider, or the best deal all the providers they trust, can present to them. They'll try to pick devices with the longest good record, that does everything they want and more, for the cheapest.

    I did a similar thing to start in IT. I supported friends, friends-of-friends, family, friends-of-family, most often recovering files and replacing hard drives in laptops that had terrible overheating problems and fixing up laboured Pentium 4 machines that people treated like and expected to keep up with multi-core 64bit systems. Now I'm lucky enough to be part of a Unified Communications solutions company, mainly on the network infrastructure side.

    Before I go on, I have to be honest, I am lost as to suggesting a way of getting the same result for your callerID thing. I have a bit of experience with IP telephony, but mainly taking phone lines for a large corporation off TDM lines, recording (with Digium's opensource Asterisk) the necessary lines while passing the phone exchange task on to a different Linux based PABX solution (Avaya). But pulling off of the Plain Old Telephone System, and distributing data to Windows platforms is a little out of my knowlege.

    But that aside...
    The tuner card you have seems to be a bit of a hot subject. I simply googled it and "linux support" and found dozens of flame wars about whether Linux supports it. > http://forum.linuxmce.org/index.php?topic=8852.20;wap2 MythTV seems to support it and there's instructions here > http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/Ceton_InfiniTV_4

    MythTV is great. You can tune, record, stream, and probably make a nice batch of pancakes, with all your media and entertainment connections. IPTV, saved media files, analogue TV and cable TV. You can stream it to all your PCs and so forth, but check the links below to see how you can use it and set it up. I don't use it currently, but I plan to when I get the freedom of networking my home properly.
    http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/MythTV-HOWTO
    http://www.mythtv.org/wiki/Main_Page
    http://www.mythtv.org/


    I just try to better myself and expand my knowledge and people helping people is how stuff like that happens. So probably a dumb question......what all could Ubuntu be used for in a home server type environment?


    That makes sense, even though Android is a form of Linux Samsung's version of Android is different from LG's version of Android.


    I've noticed that, people want to spend under $500 for a laptop but yet expect performance out of it from a $800+ laptop. Another dumb question.....what is a Unified Communications solutions company?


    One of the things that sucks about WMCE is it can only be watched on that same computer, I try to stream it to my Xbox's by using the Windows Media center app but it lags terribly, I believe that is my network though but I can't get it resolved. I've done an install of Myth but it looks so complicated to setup. The same computer I have my tuner in is the one that I also do my gaming on and I have heard that Linux isn't so great at trying to do heavy gaming on.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    May 2012
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: New User Questions

    Quote Originally Posted by thatotherdude24 View Post
    I just try to better myself and expand my knowledge and people helping people is how stuff like that happens. So probably a dumb question......what all could Ubuntu be used for in a home server type environment?


    That makes sense, even though Android is a form of Linux Samsung's version of Android is different from LG's version of Android.


    I've noticed that, people want to spend under $500 for a laptop but yet expect performance out of it from a $800+ laptop. Another dumb question.....what is a Unified Communications solutions company?


    One of the things that sucks about WMCE is it can only be watched on that same computer, I try to stream it to my Xbox's by using the Windows Media center app but it lags terribly, I believe that is my network though but I can't get it resolved. I've done an install of Myth but it looks so complicated to setup. The same computer I have my tuner in is the one that I also do my gaming on and I have heard that Linux isn't so great at trying to do heavy gaming on.
    You are quite correct. We all have things that we know, and each of us know, and have experienced different things. So unless a person wants to repeat every single experiment, mistake and project ever devised by themselves, then learning from others is how we better ourselves. To learn from others, we admit to everyone that we don't know something, and they can then share their experiences and knowledge.

    Linux can perform many roles in the Home server arena. Pretty much all of them. Sometimes, exactly like the MythTV example, it can be a steep learning curve and quite overwhelming. I myself use LXC and KVM to host typical home services on a trio of servers. Services like filesharing via Samba (windows compatible), internal DNS, intrusion detection and web proxy. Zentyal http://www.zentyal.org/ is an option to make the whole process a little easier, and it'll point out some of the many things Linux can do in a home or small business network.

    Linux's lack of uniformity hurts its popularity among many potential users, but I think most Linux users find the lack of being restricted and dictated to the very reason we use Linux, and that without all these options, Linux would lose much of its power.

    Linux is actually rather good for gaming. The problem has always been lack of flashy games. Loki software brought some incredible games to Linux, and now valve (a pretty major game publisher) has released Steam for Linux, and many of their games are available on Linux via Steam. Valve did a lot of work with Ubuntu developers and nvidia to get some incredible gaming on Linux. There are also open-source games that I would argue are as good as the proprietary games out. Some Windows games will work under Wine.

    Unified Communications (UC) is a big chunk of what we all use, VoIP, instant messaging, group/office collaboration software, file sharing/distribution services, a bunch of communications and productivity software/services/protocols- all integrated for a particular group or company into a useful system. The epitome of UC would be someone logging into their company's network from anywhere in the world, joining a video conference where people in different cities could work on one project, making changes to the same file as they agree. When the conference ends or if someone has a meeting to travel to, work can continue on the files/project by everyone, and all could continue to communicate via software phones, text messages, internet chat (facebook chat).

    That example is pretty out there, and can be accomplished without designing a specific network or service for this purpose. Many of our clients start with wanting an internal phone system, or to secure their existing network with some of our security solutions, or improve their network to handle more traffic. I tend to work more with the network infrastructure, switches, routers, hardware firewalls and wireless lan controllers and access points.

    I also keep involved with core network services like dns, network management software, syslog servers and vitalization platforms. This is where Linux/Unix excels.
    I dream of a world where our lives can remain private, and our technology can remain open to all.

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