Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Confusion with mount points in Linux

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Beans
    8

    Question Confusion with mount points in Linux

    I am a former Windows user who has migrated to Linux (read Ubuntu) full time. Though in my PC I have kept the Windows partitions intact, I have bought a new Laptop whose hard disk I want to partition. Had it been Windows, I would have partitioned its 1 TB partition as follows:

    Music - 250 GB
    Videos - 550 GB
    Important - 100 GB
    Swap - 8 GB
    OS - 23 GB

    Now in Linux, I know the mount points for some,
    OS - /
    Home - /home

    But I can't understand what mount points to set for Music, Videos and the Important partition containing family photos and documents. I'll be grateful, if anyone could shed some light on it.

    Thanks,
    EG

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    SoCal
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 14.04 Trusty Tahr

    Re: Confusion with mount points in Linux

    Quote Originally Posted by arunthegr8 View Post
    I am a former Windows user who has migrated to Linux (read Ubuntu) full time. Though in my PC I have kept the Windows partitions intact, I have bought a new Laptop whose hard disk I want to partition. Had it been Windows, I would have partitioned its 1 TB partition as follows:

    Music - 250 GB
    Videos - 550 GB
    Important - 100 GB
    Swap - 8 GB
    OS - 23 GB

    Now in Linux, I know the mount points for some,
    OS - /
    Home - /home

    But I can't understand what mount points to set for Music, Videos and the Important partition containing family photos and documents. I'll be grateful, if anyone could shed some light on it.

    Thanks,
    EG
    The mount point is a directory (folder) that you mount a partition to. Nothing more, nothing less. Are the "Music, Videos and the Important partition containing family photos and documents" going to be available for all users. If so you want to mount them outside of the /home file structure. Where you mount them is really up to you. You can create a mount point at /data (make a directory data at / or you could use the directory /srv. There is a purpose for all the default directories. See here for an overview.

    When you store data in your home directory (/home/USER) only the USER has access to it. When you store data outside of the /home directory you should set the user, group and others permissions correctly or you will have endless headaches. This includes setting group inheritance permissions, The default is to not inherit the group permissions in Linux, but it is easy to set up.

    Questions...
    -BAB1

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    SW Forida
    Beans
    Hidden!
    Distro
    Ubuntu 16.04 Xenial Xerus

    Re: Confusion with mount points in Linux

    One advantage of Linux is the mount point is not c: d: e: but music, videos, or whatever you want. The default /home has some of those same locations to store your Music, Documents etc., but you do not have to use them. But in Linux you have to create a mount point, and add that mount to fstab with details on format, which partition and who has permissions & ownership as defaults.

    I use links, some users suggest bind as it may work with Networking better. And some Linux purist say having separate partitions is Windows like.

    I prefer a separate /data partition. Then you can easily share your data without having the conflict of the user settings in hidden files & folders. Works best if all installed systems are Debian based, see UID issues below.

    The actual user settings are small. My /home is 2GB with most of that as .wine with Picasa which I have not yet moved to my /data. Because /home is small I now keep it as part of / (root).
    Then I can have a fully functioning system on one drive but have data linked in from other partitions on other drives.

    Data can be shared without the possible conflicts of user settings being different in different versions. I only copy some settings from one install to the next, normally. But I have to separately back up /home and the /data partition. Also saves the error of reformating a /home partition accidentally. I never reformat my /data and just configure / for install.

    Splitting home directory discussion and details:
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1811198
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1901437
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.p...hlight=%2Fdata
    Link is on move home but see post by bodhi.zazen on data partition #6
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=325048
    For more info on UEFI boot install & repair - Regularly Updated :
    http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2147295
    Please use Thread Tools above first post to change to [Solved] when/if answered completely.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •