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Thread: Linux distros not user friendly enough?

  1. #1
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    Linux distros not user friendly enough?

    i recently started using Linux after many years of using windows. love the fact its more secure and Lubuntu works really fast on my system and that it has a world of apps written by people who care if it works or not tho i just wonder why its so very difficult to get anything done, its not entirely user friendly. are all distros the same in this respect? being a staunch iphone hater the fact Linux is open to change just about anything much like android is really a plus.

  2. #2
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    Re: But why

    There's a lot of variety in ease of use on the Linux desktop depending on your use case (what you're trying to get done) and the software you choose to use. LXDE (the Lubuntu environment) is an uber-lightweight system, so it's not going to be a pretty and easy to use as the default Unity desktop. I mean, Linux is just the kernel, and Android uses the Linux kernel, too; that's how different two different Linux OSs can really be. If you've ever played with the Chromebook OS, that's a Linux, too.

    If Lubuntu isn't doing what you need it to do, shop around. If you have trouble with a specific app, look for alternatives; if the LXDE desktop is more trouble than it's worth, try a new desktop; if Linux in general just isn't pushing your buttons, you can always try Windows again. But I'd say that in general, yes, the distros really can be very different animals, and although there are some similarities and some apps that you'll see across Linux desktops and although some things really are just not as friendly as you might expect from Windows (though the reverse is true in many cases, too,) it's worth exploring.

  3. #3
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    Re: But why

    What are you trying to do that's causing you to think doing things on linux( in general) is anymore difficult than on any other operating system?
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  4. #4
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    Re: Linux distros not user friendly enough?

    Changed the title to a more informative one.
    Bringing old hardware back to life. About problems due to upgrading.
    Please visit Quick Links -> Unanswered Posts.
    Don't use this space for a list of your hardware. It only creates false hits in the search engines.

  5. #5
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    Re: Linux distros not user friendly enough?

    "User friendly" depends entirely on what the user is used to. Alot of us bring preconceived ideas to a new OS and get frustrated when it doesn't behave like Windows or Mac or whatever we have become accustomed to.

    The Xfce desktop (default in Xubuntu) is used in alot of distros aimed at little kids, new computer users, and old folks who need something simple. It's lightweight and speedy but a little more full-featured than the LXDE desktop is.

    On newer computers, Ubuntu and Kubuntu are very user-friendly for people used to Mac (Ubuntu) or Windows (Kubuntu). Many distros aimed at former Windows users feature the beautiful KDE desktop (PCLinuxOS, Mepis, Kubuntu), and Ubuntu might seem familiar to a Mac user.

  6. #6
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    Re: Linux distros not user friendly enough?

    Well yes. Its hard to get things done in Linux until you can remember enough commands, though Ubuntu is a lot more GUI oriented than some of the linux distros i've tried. That's why i've been using ubuntu for a few months, switching to windows for the next few months, and back over the last four years or so...
    The good thing is that search engines exist or I would have simply dropped linux completely

  7. #7
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    Re: Linux distros not user friendly enough?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peripheral Visionary View Post
    "User friendly" depends entirely on what the user is used to. Alot of us bring preconceived ideas to a new OS and get frustrated when it doesn't behave like Windows or Mac or whatever we have become accustomed to.

    The Xfce desktop (default in Xubuntu) is used in alot of distros aimed at little kids, new computer users, and old folks who need something simple. It's lightweight and speedy but a little more full-featured than the LXDE desktop is.

    On newer computers, Ubuntu and Kubuntu are very user-friendly for people used to Mac (Ubuntu) or Windows (Kubuntu). Many distros aimed at former Windows users feature the beautiful KDE desktop (PCLinuxOS, Mepis, Kubuntu), and Ubuntu might seem familiar to a Mac user.
    I think the problem is with the use of the terminal. Before i stumbled upon ubuntu i never knew the existence of the command line, even in windows.
    People switching to linux from windows suddenly have to use lots of words they do not even understand. They are afraid of "breaking" their computer. Though Ubuntu is easier to use than many, the presence of the terminal remains.

  8. #8
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    Re: Linux distros not user friendly enough?

    Quote Originally Posted by black3agl3 View Post
    I think the problem is with the use of the terminal. Before i stumbled upon ubuntu i never knew the existence of the command line, even in windows.
    I rarely ever use the terminal. I update software, install new stuff, change settings, desktop stuff, move files and stuff around, everything - all in a simple point-and-click interface.

    The terminal is a cool thing to learn and use, but hardly necessary for new users, at least in my Xubuntu Precise. I've used it maybe twice since I got this computer with Xubuntu on it! And that was just to add a repository to keep some software updated - graphically by the way - using Update Manager.

    My teacher called the terminal "an awesome secret weapon" that makes doing alot of tasks quicker and more specifically. When I need it, which is rarely if ever, I have a "cheat sheet" that he made which gets me through the commands in a few minutes.

  9. #9
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    Re: Linux distros not user friendly enough?

    part of my problem is im forced to use a lighter version at the moment. i had gotten ubuntu and it looked great and worked ok but it lagged my hardware lots. in the future when i get a faster rig ill be sure to get one the robust versions and not have lubuntu. my user friendly issue was with the large amount of commands to be used. im not afraid since they are strait forward enough, i just wondered its a long time since the masses used command lines and not the gui we all have come to admire. its a learning curve but everthing is, just for instance i was trying to enable compiling for use of docky but once i followed the online help guides it still isnt working and i know thats the life of an app but it works with other comps using this same os so i was thinking it was strange.

  10. #10
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    Re: Linux distros not user friendly enough?

    Oh, you're enabling compositing for Docky, not compiling. Compositing means the layering and rendering that makes desktop effects possible, like window animations and transparent widgets. LXDE uses OpenBox as its window manager, which doesn't do compositing by default.

    And wow - yes - doing a quick Google search for how to enable compositing in OpenBox, it does look like a lot of really arcane commands and flags. = / Really lightweight desktops tend to have more of their options controlled by editing configuration files or sending terminal commands.

    The higher-end desktops tend to manage options like this one either in the GUI, or in the case of Gnome-based distros, buried in something that looks like the Windows registry. (In this case, there isn't any way I know of to turn off compositing in the higher-end desktops.)

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