Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast
Results 21 to 30 of 47

Thread: Five programming languages to know.

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Beans
    169
    Distro
    Ubuntu 11.10 Oneiric Ocelot

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    My answer I guess depends on what know means.

    Code:
    if (know == dabblein){
     @languages=(perl, php, autolisp, arduino, SQL, basic, visual_basic);
    {
    Scratch half of that list. That leaves Perl, SQL and arduino currently. By way of an excuse, I got VB from a grant years back before my OSS enlightenment.

    Perl is my favorite. A bit quirky, but I mostly get it.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Beans
    1,632

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    I agree with previous posters. You will have a huge variation based on what purpose the developers are designing to.

    Right now I'm doing mostly web development, which means I'm really using a stack of languages anyway. Groovy, Java, Javascript, html, Freemarker, sql for several different engines, just off the top of my head, for just the current projects. And all those languages for each project.

    For UN*X scripting, you get: Perl, Bash, sed, awk, ruby. For UN*X developing, C and C++.

    I could go on quite a bit, but won't. Another branch of the discussion actually took my attention, which is the bizarre languages part.

    <digression type="reminisce">

    The one that comes to mind is from back in the late '80s or maybe early '90s called DataFlow. It was a drag and drop "object oriented" language for the Mac. The icon was a toilet, and it had icons for all sorts of constructs and you connected it with pipes. When you ran the program each icon would shake as code went through it, and each pipe would shake between steps. It was buggy as heck, and it would crash but the components would continue shaking anyway, even while you rebooted your Mac. It was totally useless except you could waste a few weekends finding new and inventive ways to make it crash. It also made a pretty good drinking game because it was so slow you could read what happened, and you had a chance to breathe between drinks when your branch of code got hit multiple times.

    Another one from about that time was Hypercard. It was object oriented in a bizarre natural language way, that was I suppose closer to Lisp than anything else I know. At the time 2400 baud modems were pretty high class and 9600 baud was just getting to the experimental stage. The Internet existed and we used it, but it was still only for schools so the BBS was king. My buddies and I were playing a game, I think it was TradeWars. You had to outfit star ships and take over planets, it was fun but an organizational nightmare. I wrote a robot in Hypercard to play the game. I logged in, downloaded the map and got status on all my planets and ships, then signed off. My program would maintain a certain number of troops and ships in each place, and then I would allocate the rest of my resources by looking at the map. Then I would log in and paste the hypercard-generated script into the game. I won the first game after a close battle, but after that nobody wanted to play the second time.

    </digression>

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Texas
    Beans
    75
    Distro
    Ubuntu 10.04 Lucid Lynx

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1clue View Post
    I agree with previous posters. You will have a huge variation based on what purpose the developers are designing to.
    Yeah, I wasn't that clear in my initial post. I'm more of just interested in what people are using and why, with no other interest. So evidently it's dependent on the person.

    I have noticed that the majority of the people who have posted use C.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1clue View Post
    The one that comes to mind is from back in the late '80s or maybe early '90s called DataFlow. It was a drag and drop "object oriented" language for the Mac. The icon was a toilet, and it had icons for all sorts of constructs and you connected it with pipes. When you ran the program each icon would shake as code went through it, and each pipe would shake between steps. It was buggy as heck, and it would crash but the components would continue shaking anyway, even while you rebooted your Mac. It was totally useless except you could waste a few weekends finding new and inventive ways to make it crash.
    What a completely dysfunctional language. I like it.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Beans
    1,632

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ghostmn View Post
    Yeah, I wasn't that clear in my initial post. I'm more of just interested in what people are using and why, with no other interest. So evidently it's dependent on the person.

    I have noticed that the majority of the people who have posted use C.
    I think mostly because it's one of the languages you learn in college, although they weren't teaching it yet when I went through. It was Pascal and FORTRAN. And assembly, and some languages specific to the Control Data CDC 170, ....

    As well, C is the language of UNIX, most of the guts are written in C and so are many of the apps. It's also a pretty simple language with virtually no safeties, which makes it ideal for either tricky/expert code or wild obfuscation.

    What a completely dysfunctional language. I like it.
    Come to think of it, I believe that was its only asset. I used it about a month, I think, then lost interest.

  5. #25

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1clue View Post
    I think mostly because it's one of the languages you learn in college, although they weren't teaching it yet when I went through. It was Pascal and FORTRAN. And assembly, and some languages specific to the Control Data CDC 170, ....
    I can't speak for anyone else, but as someone who's been through the process somewhat more recently, my formal education is Java, assembly, Matlab, LabVIEW, and VHDL. I used my own time to learn C because my university's CS department wasn't interested in teaching really useful skills.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Beans
    1

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    being fairly new to ubuntu, the only "language" i use for now is bash (not sure if bash is actually considered a language when compared to the likes of c, c++, java, etc etc)

    i use it primarily for utilities to assist android users with different aspects of "rooting" and or customizing their phones

    i plan on diving into c# and java in the near future

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    London,England
    Beans
    1,022
    Distro
    Ubuntu Karmic Koala (testing)

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    Languages and why I learned them:

    Java: learnt in a course on distributed computing, dislike the language if im honest though.
    C: learnt very basic C for ic programming. pic chips and such, as such ive never made a gui in C.
    Python: easy to learn, quick for scripting, fast enough for most things
    VB: learned years ago in school.
    C#: dabbled with dot net to try cross platform stuff for about six months, at the time mono was too bleeding edge so i got frustrated and gave up.
    Last edited by Hairy_Palms; January 24th, 2013 at 10:42 PM.
    Jeremy Clarkson - "A Dazzling Hero of Political Incorrectness"
    My LastFM profile
    want to Give each GTK program its own theme? well look Here

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Beans
    1,632

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by trent.josephsen View Post
    I can't speak for anyone else, but as someone who's been through the process somewhat more recently, my formal education is Java, assembly, Matlab, LabVIEW, and VHDL. I used my own time to learn C because my university's CS department wasn't interested in teaching really useful skills.
    Seems to me they were trying to give examples of a wide variation of languages.

    FWIW I have never professionally used ANY of the languages I learned in college. I saw assembly language as useful, and Pascal was about as useful as anything at the time, but the companies I've worked for since were rooted in the real world, and as such used languages that were common to the time instead of antiques.

    The one language I see bashed quite often here is Java, which actually gets used quite a bit in enterprise work that I do, and even more if you count the hundreds of languages that compile to Java byte code to run on the JVM. People seem to think of it as something that runs in a browser to mess up your life, but in most cases I think it's on the server, and performs nicely there.

  9. #29

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by 1clue View Post
    Seems to me they were trying to give examples of a wide variation of languages.
    I might agree with you, but if I had been a computer science major I definitely wouldn't have learned LabVIEW or VHDL and I probably wouldn't have done much Matlab either. I only learned what I did because of the bastard offspring of CS and EE that was my focus. All the useful stuff I learned from projects.

    I've never used Java for anything but homework. I don't think it's useless, it's just not part of my domain. C, assembly, VHDL, yes; Java, no.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Beans
    1,632

    Re: Five programming languages to know.

    Quote Originally Posted by trent.josephsen View Post
    I might agree with you, but if I had been a computer science major I definitely wouldn't have learned LabVIEW or VHDL and I probably wouldn't have done much Matlab either. I only learned what I did because of the bastard offspring of CS and EE that was my focus. All the useful stuff I learned from projects.

    I've never used Java for anything but homework. I don't think it's useless, it's just not part of my domain. C, assembly, VHDL, yes; Java, no.
    Back when I went, people got just a CS degree. Now, it's just one step more useful than a History degree. So you get some sort of engineer who has CS and whatever their main focus is, or CS plus a minor in something. In the scenario of an engineer going for CS courses, MatLab and LabView make all sorts of sense.

Page 3 of 5 FirstFirst 12345 LastLast

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •