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Thread: Lts

  1. #1
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    Lts

    Should I stick with LTS version or update to non-LTS version?

  2. #2
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    Re: Lts

    What release are you using?

  3. #3
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    Re: Lts

    It really depends on usage habits. If you use Ubuntu for work LTS is the way to go. I am primarily pleasure user and like to see the new features, so I install the latest versions. Hardware is also a consideration when deciding whether to use a new version. I tried to stick with 10.04 LTS when 10.10 came out but lost my resolve in a couple of hours and have used every new release since 9.10.

    https://wiki.ubuntu.com/Releases
    Last edited by Frogs Hair; November 25th, 2012 at 06:43 PM.
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  4. #4
    ibjsb4 is offline Ubuntu addict and loving it
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    Re: Lts

    With LTS you can do a release upgrade every two years or in the case of 12o4, you can keep it for up to 5 years. I say its more for people (like me) that just want to use it and not be bothered with upgrades.

    If on the other hand you want to be running the latest release of not only ubuntu, but the software/app's that are offered, then maybe the six month cycle is for you.

  5. #5
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    Re: Lts

    If you want a release that will be supported, and have security updates for a long time without needing upgrades, go with LTS. You won't need to do any upgrades every 6 months . However, software versions may be a bit older, due to the fact that LTS is designed for stability

    If you want a release that has the latest features, programs, .etc .etc, go with non-lts. You will get the latest stuff, but will have to upgrade every 6 months to keep it at the latest versions. Sometimes, it takes a month for bugs to settle down though.

    Also, between LTS versions, I advise a new install over Upgrading. Lots of things change between LTS versions, and sometimes upgrades break and such. Do backup your data beforehand though
    Last edited by sandyd; November 25th, 2012 at 08:41 PM. Reason: wording
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  6. #6
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    Re: Lts

    With hard drives as large as they are now, and Ubuntu only really needing 10 to 25GB for an install, I suggest both.
    But then I still have every install since I converted to 64bit with 9.10. Time to house clean out the unsupported one that I cannot update.
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  7. #7
    monkeybrain2012 is offline Grande Half-n-Half Cinnamon Ubuntu
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    Re: Lts

    Quote Originally Posted by sandyd View Post

    If you want a release that has the latest features, programs, .etc .etc, go with non-lts. You will get the latest stuff, but will have to upgrade every 6 months. Sometimes, it takes a month for bugs to settle down though.
    You don't need to upgrade every 6 months, non LTS's are supported for 18 months. This is a biggest misconception I find on this forum, no one says you must upgrade in step with Canonical's release schedule.

    @Op, try the live usb or better, make a small test partition on your hard drive and see which release works best for you before you commit to one (or keep many like oldfred said ). I find "stability" in LTS are over-rated, it just means consistent behaviour in Linux talk, it doesn't mean necessarily better or more solid performance in my experience. If something is consistently broken for two years it is considered "stable" too by that definition.
    Last edited by monkeybrain2012; November 25th, 2012 at 08:32 PM.

  8. #8
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    Re: Lts

    Quote Originally Posted by monkeybrain2012 View Post
    You don't need to upgrade every 6 months, non LTS's are supported for 18 months. This is a biggest misconception I find on this forum, no one says you must upgrade in step with Canonical's release schedule.

    @Op, try the live usb or better, make a small test partition on your hard drive and see which release works best for you before you commit to one (or keep many like oldfred said ). I find "stability" in LTS are over-rated, it just means consistent behaviour in Linux talk, it doesn't mean necessarily better or more solid performance in my experience. If something is consistently broken for two years it is considered "stable" too by that definition.
    bad wording -chnaged it a bit - meant to say "update every 6 months to keep having the latest features/progs"
    Don't waste your energy trying to change opinions ... Do your thing, and don't care if they like it.

  9. #9
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    Re: Lts

    Quote Originally Posted by monkeybrain2012 View Post
    You don't need to upgrade every 6 months, non LTS's are supported for 18 months. This is a biggest misconception I find on this forum, no one says you must upgrade in step with Canonical's release schedule.
    Definitely true. It is also true, though, that community support of non-LTS releases tapers off before EOL. Most people either stick with LTS or the latest release (within a couple months). You certainly don't have to put yourself into one of these camps, but it's usually the most practical.
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  10. #10
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    Re: Lts

    This is linux, do what you want.

    Stick with LTS
    Upgrade to the latest
    Have Xubuntu or Lubuntu or Kubuntu
    Have one of each
    Have two of each

    Like oldfred said, you can partition your harddrive and have as many Ubuntu versions as you like.
    Last edited by nothingspecial; November 25th, 2012 at 08:53 PM. Reason: typo

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