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Thread: Michael Meeks' thoughts

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    Michael Meeks' thoughts

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2012/09...linux_desktop/
    Quoted from the link above:
    As a result, bundling Windows with hardware essentially costs OEMs nothing. In fact, it probably earns them money, which in turn makes it easier to pay developers and component makers to ensure that specific hardware configurations are well supported by the OS – all of which makes Windows more attractive.
    and
    To that end, he wishes more hackers would spend less time worrying about things like GUI controls, flashy desktop effects, and how their desktops compare to Windows and Mac OS X. Instead, they should work to build systems that are secure, easy to manage, integrate well with existing network services, upgrade smoothly, and require little retraining – all qualities that could help desktop Linux gain better footing in enterprise environments.
    Blog link
    http://people.gnome.org/~michael/blo...top-linux.html

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    Re: Michael Meeks' thoughts

    Well, I've been saying the first quote for years now, at least for the large OEMs. It's not so for the small OEM's, though.

    But the 2nd thing he said doesn't really make much sense to me. They pretty much already have built "systems that are secure, easy to manage, integrate well with existing network services, upgrade smoothly". But the part about "requiring little retraining" can't possibly happen unless they try to make things more like Windows, which is what he is saying they shouldn't do. I really don't get his point, since they're already doing everything he says they should be doing. Then again, I'm using KDE and not Unity or Gnome Shell.
    Last edited by forrestcupp; September 12th, 2012 at 01:53 PM.
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    Re: Michael Meeks' thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by forrestcupp View Post
    But the 2nd thing he said doesn't really make much sense to me. They pretty much already have built "systems that are secure, easy to manage, integrate well with existing network services, upgrade smoothly".
    Do you really think that's true with respect to upgrading? The standard advice that I still hear about upgrading Ubuntu, to take the most relevant example here, is that it pretty much shouldn't be done; instead, you should backup your data and do a clean install from a CD/USB/DVD. When that is the standard advice, it seems doubtful that the upgrade process is "smooth." (Sure, it works great for some people, but almost everything works great for someone.)

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    Re: Michael Meeks' thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by jrog View Post
    Do you really think that's true with respect to upgrading? The standard advice that I still hear about upgrading Ubuntu, to take the most relevant example here, is that it pretty much shouldn't be done; instead, you should backup your data and do a clean install from a CD/USB/DVD. When that is the standard advice, it seems doubtful that the upgrade process is "smooth." (Sure, it works great for some people, but almost everything works great for someone.)
    That's the standard advice because we have a bunch of scared wimps in the community.

    I've been around Ubuntu since Breezy Badger. Anytime I've had it installed and a new version came out, I always did an upgrade rather than a clean install. I've never once had a problem with it. The only real upgrade problems I've ever run into was when I was using an early alpha.

    The upgrade process is smooth, and it always has been. And it's definitely smoother than, or at least as smooth as, upgrading Windows.
    Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You. - Dr. Seuss

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    Re: Michael Meeks' thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by forrestcupp View Post
    That's the standard advice because we have a bunch of scared wimps in the community.

    I've been around Ubuntu since Breezy Badger. Anytime I've had it installed and a new version came out, I always did an upgrade rather than a clean install. I've never once had a problem with it. The only real upgrade problems I've ever run into was when I was using an early alpha.

    The upgrade process is smooth, and it always has been. And it's definitely smoother than, or at least as smooth as, upgrading Windows.
    +1.

    Don't know why people don't recommend the update, it works perfectly fine. I've upgraded Ubuntu, SUSE, both work fine (as long as you're not upgrading to an Alpha or early Beta).

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    Re: Michael Meeks' thoughts

    The reason I am writing this on a Win 7 laptop is the reason that Linux is still languishing on 1-2% market share. Apps.

    The reality is that people don't use an OS, they use apps. It's about time Linux developers put heads together, sort out the killer apps that almost all desktop users need. Office, photo imaging, email etc.
    Want an alternative to 99% of Windows applications?
    http://www.osalt.com/

    "Dude, real programmers compile" - Plato 428BC

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    Re: Michael Meeks' thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by forrestcupp View Post
    That's the standard advice because we have a bunch of scared wimps in the community.

    I've been around Ubuntu since Breezy Badger. Anytime I've had it installed and a new version came out, I always did an upgrade rather than a clean install. I've never once had a problem with it. The only real upgrade problems I've ever run into was when I was using an early alpha.

    The upgrade process is smooth, and it always has been. And it's definitely smoother than, or at least as smooth as, upgrading Windows.
    I've never upgraded without at least having some bugs that are naggy enough that I, finally, perform a clean install. So I've had the opposite experience.

    On the other hand, upgrading and installing ubuntu is much easier than upgrading or installing windows so I'll not complain.

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    Re: Michael Meeks' thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by fatality_uk View Post
    The reason I am writing this on a Win 7 laptop is the reason that Linux is still languishing on 1-2% market share. Apps.

    The reality is that people don't use an OS, they use apps. It's about time Linux developers put heads together, sort out the killer apps that almost all desktop users need. Office, photo imaging, email etc.
    I actually think Linux does have some killer apps.

    A bigger issue is that Microsoft apps are still considered 'standard', and it's simply incredibly difficult to dislodge a standard. For instance, Apple computers never became truly 'mainstream' until Microsoft started selling OSX software.

    As apps migrate to the web it'll certainly help out Linux, but for right now Microsoft, Adobe and Autodesk are standard apps, and (mostly) unavailable on Linux...

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    Re: Michael Meeks' thoughts

    Still beats me why would we want the enterprise niche.

    Let MS keep it. Really.
    Xye incredibly difficult puzzle game with minimal graphics. Also at playdeb
    Got a blog: Will Stay Free

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    Re: Michael Meeks' thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by vexorian View Post
    Still beats me why would we want the enterprise niche.

    Let MS keep it. Really.
    It depends on who the "we" is. Canonical earns money by providing support to enterprises.

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