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Thread: Your precious Solid State Drive

  1. #1
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    Question Your precious Solid State Drive

    It is great to have a Solid State Hard drive, SSD. They are very quick and meant to be more reliable, as they have no moving parts. (From what I have read, Intel SSDs are meant to be by far and away the most reliable SSDs at the moment. I wonder whether you agree with that.) Unfortunately, they are more expensive than tradittional hard disks and smaller, too. That makes real-estate space on a SSD at a premium.

    Some things really ought to go on the SSD. Others could go onto a tradditional Hard Disk, if both are in the machine.

    What I would like to know is what things really should get put onto the SSD? If you are partitioning the SSD, what folders shouls definitely be on the SSD? Could the /home go onto the Hard Disk? I believe that games should go onto the Hard Disk,as modern games can be very large installations and it doesn't matter how fast the drive is for them, as the game is loaded into memory when it runs anyway.

    I look forward to hearing what you have to say!

    Thank you.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    The only thing I really use my HD in my laptops is for the OS. Everything else is in the cloud....
    Alan

    Saddleworth, Manchester (UK).

  3. #3
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    I dont know a vast amount about SSDs but I have looked into the possibilities of having one alongside my HDD to increases speeds. From what I read it seemed the sensible move was to have your root on the SSD and your /home on the HDD as /home is where most of your files are going to be and therefore take up most space. Also it may reduce your writes to the SSD thus helping prolong the life of the drive.

    I did wonder when I looked into it whether the hidden configs in your /home directory might reduce your operating speed by being on the slower drive. Would be interested to hear peoples opinions on that.

    Just the thoughts of the layman....

  4. #4
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    I have / and /home on my 64GB SSD, swap and /data on my 1TB HD (with swappiness set to 0 as I have 8GB RAM).

    Videos, Music, Pictures etc are symlinks to folders on my /data partition.

    This way I still get the speed advantage of an SSD for all of my configuration files that live in /home.
    If /home was on my HD then applications would have to read files from the HD when starting up, so I wouldn't get the same performance boost that I do with my setup.

    To decrease writes to my SSD I enable the noatime option in fstab as well as turning off the ext4 journaling (I use a UPS). Also make sure you use the discard option to enable TRIM support.

    Also /tmp is mounted as a RAM disk.
    Last edited by Cheesemill; June 13th, 2012 at 09:37 PM.
    Cheesemill

  5. #5
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    In short everything that you write to frequently > tmp, var, cache files, download etc should be placed on the rotating drive with symlinks (easiest way) to the drive. All of your system files, home etc should be left on the SSD. Otherwise you defeat the purpose of the SSD drive. And it makes a huge difference in performance even on a high end system.
    AMD FX-6200 - MSI 4.1Ghz- Nvidia GTX550Ti -12/GIG - 60GB-SSD/500 Sata - 12.04 - Gnome 3

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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

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    Cheesemill

  7. #7
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    Lightbulb Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    IMHO, you should move things that are updated frequently off of the SSD to a hard drive. Things such as /var/log. And the place where your web browser cache is. Stuff like that.

    It is my understanding that frequent updates somehow "wear out" the memory locations.

    Tim
    Cyberpower PC, Core i5 2500 3.3 gHz, 8GB DDR3, ATI 6770 1GB, Samsung BX 2440 LED 1080p, 1 TB SATA III, 2 TB SATA III, Siduction Linux 64-bit

  8. #8
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    My setup is almost identical to Cheesemill's. Having /home on the ssd is a good idea because a lot of frequently read files reside there, and it's easy to symlink things to subdirectories on the big drive, in my case, /storage. I also have a few games (HIB) installed to /storage.

    Another change you can make (if you want everything perfect) is to change the scheduler for the SSD to noop or deadline, but I forget how to do that

  9. #9
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    Total newbie question here ... do solid state drives run cooler than hard disk drives?

  10. #10
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    Re: Your precious Solid State Drive

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobhuber View Post
    In short everything that you write to frequently > tmp, var, cache files, download etc should be placed on the rotating drive with symlinks (easiest way) to the drive. All of your system files, home etc should be left on the SSD. Otherwise you defeat the purpose of the SSD drive. And it makes a huge difference in performance even on a high end system.
    How to do this exactly as you said?
    thanks

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