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Thread: Howto make USB boot drives

  1. #791
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    Quote Originally Posted by marks2 View Post
    @sudodus

    Maybe I'm trying to fix the wrong problem then. During the boot I get a microcode warning:

    TSC_DEADLINE disabled due to Errata; please update microcode to version: 0x22 (or later)

    The subsequent lines report that microcode is updated to version 0x17. So it's 11 updates behind. I have no idea how significant that is.
    Neither do I (know how significant that is).
    Apparently the Meltdown thing is continuing to evolve.
    The microcode is doing other things too (not only mitigating Meltdown and Spectre), so the upgrades might focus on other tasks ...
    I'm wondering if there is a way to just replace the iso9660 partition (it's dev/sdb4 on my setup) with the iso from a new live stick?
    If there is space enough (in the partition) you can clone from the iso file to the partition (/dev/sdx4) but after that you cannot expect the persistent live drive to work. The 'system content' of the casper-rw partition will no longer match what it is supposed to overlay.

    The 'home content' will be OK, but for example installed program packages will be lost, if you backup 'home', create a new system and restore 'home' to the new system. (What you suggest is equivalent to that action.)

  2. #792
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    It turns out that 18.04.1 has the same problem. Why did they release .1 without fixing that? So it might require the steps I initially outlined, attempting to write to partition that is usually read-only.

    Thanks --
    Mark

  3. #793
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    @marks2,

    Instead of fighting with a persistent live system, you can try to create an installed system in a fast USB 3 pendrive or an SSD connected via USB 3 or eSATA. This way you will get a system, where is it possible (maybe even easy) to install the Intel microcode, that you want. I am running such systems successfully, and I find them stable.

    See this link with details to help with the installation: How do I install Ubuntu to a USB key? - install like into an internal drive

  4. #794
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    Yes, I'll probably try that next. I actually had done that with a Kingston USB3. It lasted maybe 3 days before corrupting. It seems to me that that there are optimizations for running on a flash that are not made with a full install. You don't want all that IO activity that a real drive can handle.

    It may not be a fair comparison since the persistent drive I'm currently using supports higher speeds.

    The best luck I've had with persistent setups was with puppy linux installed on a no-name USB2 flash drive that I used for years. The puppy approach prevented I/O blocking and over-frequent writes to the drive. Unfortunately, puppy is now only randomly supported.

    The situation with Spectre sounds pretty dire. It appears that the new debian/ubuntu ISOs are being shipped with the bad microcode that intel rolled back. This may actually be worse than no microcode at all. The distributors probably assume that users can upgrade as soon as they install. But this isn't true with a live system.

    Thanks!
    -- Mark

  5. #795
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    Hey sudodus, I've installed persistent Ubuntu 18.04 using mkusb, but from the first time I did boot up I've got weird temporal background color switches: https://askubuntu.com/questions/1078...lue-background

    They do not bother much, but I'm interested in solution or some kind of guideline where I could check for defect that causes these background changes.

    Also, it seems that running command sudo update-initramfs -c
    Gives me this output:

    update-initramfs is disabled since running on read-only media
    The strange output appears mentioning that I'm running on a read-only media. But the changes I make to the system are persistent. This is kind of confusing

  6. #796
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    Quote Originally Posted by boqsc View Post
    Hey sudodus, I've installed persistent Ubuntu 18.04 using mkusb, but from the first time I did boot up I've got weird temporal background color switches: https://askubuntu.com/questions/1078...lue-background

    They do not bother much, but I'm interested in solution or some kind of guideline where I could check for defect that causes these background changes.
    I think it is a compatibility problem between the graphics driver and and the graphics chip/card at an early stage of the boot process. One way to 'get rid of it' should be to turn off the plymouth output of '5 dots' by removing 'splash' from the lines starting with 'linux' in .../boot/grub/grub.cfg.

    Mount the usbboot partition, edit the file with nano and save it. Replace x by the actual drive letter for the persistent live drive, for example b or c.

    Code:
    sudo mount /dev/sdx3 /mnt
    sudo nano /mnt/boot/grub/grub.cfg
    Also, it seems that running command sudo update-initramfs -c
    Gives me this output:


    update-initramfs is disabled since running on read-only media
    The strange output appears mentioning that I'm running on a read-only media. But the changes I make to the system are persistent. This is kind of confusing
    'update-initramfs' is intended for installed systems, not for live or persistent live systems.

    (The output message is somewhat misleading.)

  7. #797
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    Quote Originally Posted by sudodus View Post
    I think it is a compatibility problem between the graphics driver and and the graphics chip/card at an early stage of the boot process. One way to 'get rid of it' should be to turn off the plymouth output of '5 dots' by removing 'splash' from the lines starting with 'linux' in .../boot/grub/grub.cfg.

    Mount the usbboot partition, edit the file with nano and save it. Replace x by the actual drive letter for the persistent live drive, for example b or c.

    Code:
    sudo mount /dev/sdx3 /mnt
    sudo nano /mnt/boot/grub/grub.cfg
    Well, this solution solves splash screen background problem by removing the splash screen itself.
    No Splash screen - no Splash screen background problem.

  8. #798
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    Quote Originally Posted by boqsc View Post
    Well, this solution solves splash screen background problem by removing the splash screen itself.
    No Splash screen - no Splash screen background problem.
    That's right.

    A problem with live and persistent live systems is that you cannot use a separately installed graphics driver (the overlay of a persistent live system is applied after the driver is activated). It might help with some boot option, for example 'nomodeset', but you might as well turn off the splash screen, so that is what I would recommend.

  9. #799
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    Is there any known method to reconnect live persistent usb drive after it was accidently disconnected?

  10. #800
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    Re: Howto make USB boot drives

    Quote Originally Posted by boqsc View Post
    Is there any known method to reconnect live persistent usb drive after it was accidently disconnected?
    No, I am sorry, but I don't think so.



    If you are lucky, there was nothing in the buffer (waiting to be written to the casper-rw partition), otherwise the data for persistence might be corrupted and you need to restore the casper-rw partition from the backup.

    If there is no backup, you should wipe the content of the casper-rw partition and start from the beginning to install programs etc. It might be possible to save the content of your home directory.
    Last edited by sudodus; 4 Days Ago at 03:48 PM.

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