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Thread: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

  1. #11
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    Aug 2009
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    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    Yes, I was aware that there was a System76 subforum here, although I did NOT know that the actual owners of that company were members of the forum. Do you think they would be alright about helping their future competition though?

  2. #12
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    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    I cannot possibly answer that question.

  3. #13
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    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    ^Well your previous post made it seem like you were under the impression that they would. That said, I'm probably not much of a threat to them, it would just be on my free time at first, and I've already been warned that making a full living off this is probably not going to be possible.

  4. #14
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    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    My general experience is that businessmen enjoy talking about their business. However it would be foolish for me to predict how another person's behavior.

  5. #15
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    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    Hahaha okay gotcha.

    Yeah, I wasn't planning to offer a tech support package, at least not right away (as I don't really have enough time or experience to be able to give that kind of a guarantee) but I figure it's a good idea to know at least some about the underlying technologies as well.

  6. #16
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    Kubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    Quote Originally Posted by gordintoronto View Post
    I have learned an enormous amount by trying to help in the forums. (This is extracted from Full Circle Magazine, issue 37.)

    Here's the approach I use: I log on to the Ubuntu Forums. I click "New Posts", then click "Last" to get messages which are usually an hour or two old. I scan down the column labelled "Replies", looking for posts which have zero replies. I let my mouse hover over the message subject, which displays the first couple of lines of the message. If it looks like something I might be able to help with, I right-click on the subject, and select "open in new tab". Now I'm looking at the message. One of the interesting items is on the left, a line which shows "beans". This is the number of messages the person has written, and if it's less than a dozen, the OP is probably a new user. These are the ones I really try to help in some way, even if I don't have the final solution.

    Quite often, a new user doesn't get any reply to a question because he doesn't provide enough information. Telling the person how to get that information doesn't solve the problem, but it can help the OP move toward the solution. For example, if it's a question about sound, it might be useful to know what sound hardware is in the OP's computer. Usually, the terminal command "lspci" will display the video and sound hardware identification. Likewise, "lsusb" will identify most webcams. Telling the OP how to run the command, and suggesting that he search the forums using that information, will often help him get the solution.

    If you're going to spend time doing this, you have to be good to yourself: recognize that you won't be able to solve every problem. For example, I don't understand Linux permissions well enough to help anyone with them, but I know a lot about hardware. You also have to avoid getting frustrated with people asking the same questions again and again. You can kindly point out to them that a Google search will find the answer, which has been sitting waiting for them all this time. Be nice, and you will add to the number of people using Ubuntu, one at a time.

    A housekeeping note: if you do much of this, you will find yourself "subscribed" to a large number of message threads. You will need to take a few minutes now and then to unsubscribe. Start at "User CP," then near the bottom of the page is "list subscriptions." Once again, we use "Last" to find the message threads which have been inactive for the longest time. Click the "notification" boxes, select "Delete subscription", then "go".
    I think this is fantastic advice for learning Linux a little better. Between researching problems that others are having and breaking your system and trying to fix it, you'll learn tons. I now know how to fix a few things that I've never broken on my system just from reading posts on here, and doing the research to try to fix a few problems others are having.

    What I recommend is to learn how to make good system backups so that you have a failsafe, and then play around. You'll either figure out how to fix it (with or without some help from the Ubuntu Forums or Google), or you'll have to reload from your backup because the system is just too trashed (or a misplaced command wiped out your /home directory ). Either way, you'll learn a little more each time about how the system works.

    Each distribution will have their own small caveats and slight differences. But, each system in the end is build on Linux and the core is pretty much the same. So, you could really start with just about any distribution.

  7. #17
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    Nov 2005
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    Bordeaux, France
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    My $.02: As mentioned earlier, using Arch will teach you about Arch. If you want to start a business selling preloaded Linux computers, you will need to know the distros you put on them. I would hazard a guess that not a lot of people would be interested in preloaded Arch computers.
    Last edited by Bachstelze; February 17th, 2012 at 11:35 PM. Reason: Typos.
    「明後日の夕方には帰ってるからね。」


  8. #18
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    Ubuntu

    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bachstelze View Post
    My $.02: As mentioned earlier, uxing Arch will teach you about Arch. If you want to start a business selling preloaded Linux computers, you will need to know the distros ou put on them. I would hazard a guess that not a lot of people would be interested in preloaded Arch computers.

  9. #19
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    Aug 2009
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    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    ^I would hazard a guess that your hazarded guess is indeed correct. So my hope is to offer a choice between Ubuntu 12.04 and Linux Mint 12.

  10. #20
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    Ubuntu

    Re: Should I use Arch to gain experience?

    Quote Originally Posted by nothingspecial View Post
    I should expand on that...

    The idea of Arch is that the individual user builds their system up exactly as they require it. So a preloaded Arch completely defeats the point.

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