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Thread: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

  1. #1
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    Exclamation Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    Good Evening.
    I have a HP pavillion zd8000 and several problems with ubuntu/kubuntu. Probably it is a driver issue...

    Firstly, i have Win7 on it. I also have Virtual box with Ubuntu on it, with zero problems.


    What happens is, I have tried installing Ubuntu and Kubuntu via wubi (with the --32 command so it downloads the x86version) but i have several issues with either of them:

    *My USB mouse (NGS brand) is identified in linux boot, since the optical light is on. However:
    --Moving the USB mouse normally moves it very slowly in the screen.
    --The touchpad moves normaly.

    *Any USB Pen/Disk is identified in linux boot, because the light turns on and stays on.
    --Can't find the device in the File Manager

    *On boot, Linux identifies and sees if i have an Ethernet cable connected, however:
    --Is unable to configure it. Even if i go to windows7, copy the IP/DNS/DHCP values and copy them over or change connection type.
    --Can't connect to the Internet.

    *If i remove any of the previous devices (the USB mouse, USB pen or ethernet cable) and insert again, nothing happens, lights don't turn on, etc....


    I would like to know if anyone knows a solution, i would like to try kubuntu or ubuntu (preferably KUBUNTU) mainly because I need it for classes, but tried to search anything related in these forums but didn't succeed.
    I found this thread ( http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1439234 ) but since i cant "hardwire a network connection", I'm pretty much stuck.

    Thank you for your time.

  2. #2
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    Re: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    Well it's Wubi and it's not the perfect installation.

    Why don't you try an Ubuntu Live CD, to see if using the system normally and not through Windows, it's working better?

  3. #3
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    Re: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    May I ask why you have decided to force 32-bit?

    If you are looking at using Ubuntu (or Kubuntu) long-term, I would suggest you do not use WUBI. WUBI is useful for short-term experimentation but not long-term use.

    The fact that it works in VB but not in WUBI reinforces the idea that perhaps you need a full installation.

    If Ubuntu in VB works fine for you, of course you can just keep that. But if you want a native installation (perhaps for speed or higher reliability), you want to avoid WUBI.

    Create a Live CD or (preferably) a Live USB of Kubuntu. I'd use 64-bit if your computer has at least 2Gb RAM and, of course, a 64-bit processor. Boot from the CD or USB and choose the option to try it out (this option will not affect your computer). If it seems to work fine, go for a full installation.

    Before doing a full installation:

    1. Back up your data. Even though the installation process has been thoroughly tested and refined over the years, there is always a small chance of data loss.
    2. In Windows 7, go to Computer Management (in your Administration Tools) > Disk Management (I think that's what it's called). Shrink your Windows partition. If you need help, please post back with a screen shot so that we can help you.
    3. Reboot Windows (it seems to need a reboot after shrinking partitions).
    4. Boot from the USB and install Kubuntu into the freed space. If you need help, please post back so we can help you.
    Full system encryption with dual-bootFull Circle MagazineProblems with WINE?
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    Re: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    I didn't know there was much difference between Windows install and Live CD.
    Since it was installed in Windows through wubi, I actually thought that it could download any driver it needed...

    I forced wubi to download the x86 because the first time i ran it, it installed the amd64 version, and i found it too "slow", now that i think about it (as "slow" being... the slow mouse bug i said last post xD).


    I will try installing Kubuntu x64 via USB. Will first check any guides that can help me, since I've only managed to sucessfully install it once (about four years ago...)

    Thank you both, will get back to you tomorrow.
    Last edited by Flame57; November 26th, 2011 at 11:24 PM.

  5. #5
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    Re: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    Quote Originally Posted by Flame57 View Post
    I will try installing Kubuntu x64 via USB. Will first check any guides that can help me, since I've only managed to sucessfully install it once (about four years ago...)

    Thank you both, will get back to you tomorrow.
    A suggestion

    Before starting to touch your Windows partitions to make space for Ubuntu, just post to the forum a snapshot of your partition system, to suggest you, the best way to do it. It's easy, but sometimes gets tricky.

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    Re: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    Thanks, here it is:

    http://img443.imageshack.us/img443/883/sem1z.png


    The language is Portuguese, any doubt just ask me and I'll translate.

    I'd prefer to take 10GBs off E: (in order to install), since I can make backups to external HDDs.


    EDIT: The processor is 64bi capable
    Last edited by Flame57; November 27th, 2011 at 04:01 AM.

  7. #7
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    Re: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    Well, as I said is not that easy.

    You have little space to install Ubuntu alongside Windows. You can leave 10 G from your hard drive but I'm not sure if windows will leave you to free them all. For Ubuntu you need at least 5-6G for the system, some G for the swap file (normally you need the double of your RAM eg 2G RAM= 4G swap) and finally you need space for your storage. Closing to the limit of space.

    I don't know if it's possible to do it.

    So I suggest you to open a new thread to ask this question, to attract more members with more ideas about this.
    Last edited by BC59; November 27th, 2011 at 08:53 AM.

  8. #8
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    Re: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    Quote Originally Posted by Flame57 View Post
    I didn't know there was much difference between Windows install and Live CD.
    Yes, a huge difference. One is installed inside Windows as an ordinary program (although it's not an ordinary program); the other is installed as a separate OS, just as (say) OSX or Windows 7 might be. WUBI is slower than a native installation, though not much, and has certain limitations that the native installation does not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flame57 View Post
    Since it was installed in Windows through wubi, I actually thought that it could download any driver it needed...
    It should, though it would have nothing to do with Windows. But it didn't -- I cannot comment why.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flame57 View Post
    I will try installing Kubuntu x64 via USB.
    I suggest that you first uninstall WUBI (but back up any data first!).

    Quote Originally Posted by Flame57 View Post
    I'd prefer to take 10GBs off E: (in order to install), since I can make backups to external HDDs.
    BC59's suggestion was a good one. However, you said you'd prefer to take 10Gb off E. According to your screen shot, you have three partitions, none of which is E.

    Your partitions are as follows:

    1. 100Mb: System reserved (probably Windows recovery). Don't touch this partition if you wish to keep Windows.
    2. C: 40Gb: This is your Windows 7 system.
    3. F: 53Gb: This, presumably, is your data partition.

    Incidentally, these partitions will have different names in Linux. In order, they would most likely be called /dev/sda1, /dev/sda2 and /dev/sda3.

    They are all primary partitions. A hard drive (for historical reasons) can have no more than four partitions. However, there is something called an extended partition. An extended partition can have many logical partitions, which allows you to have more than four partitions in total.

    May I suggest that you shrink your F: drive by 12Gb. Then, when you install Ubuntu, partition the free space as follows.

    • The entire 22Gb: A single extended partition.

    Within that extended partition, create the following logical partitions:

    • 10Gb: Your Kubuntu installation. This will hold your root (i.e. "/") folder. Format as ext4.
    • 10Gb: Your /home folder. Format as ext4.
    • 2Gb: Your swap space.

    You can do this partitioning at the time you install; choose manual partitioning when prompted.

    When you install, ensure that you are connected to the Internet. The installation will automatically download any relevant drivers that are required but are not on the installation disk.

    More information:

    • The sizes I have suggested are, well, only suggestions. However, they are based on experience. The good news is that doing it the way I suggested will allow you to change your mind later, further shrinking F: and expanding the extended and logical partitions (specifically your /home partition).


    • Your swap space must be equal to your RAM, or greater, if you want to be able to hibernate Kubuntu. If you make your RAM smaller, you will not be able to hibernate. Having said that, if you choose to encrypt your home folder, you will not be able to hibernate anyway, because your swap space will also be encrypted.


    • The extended partition will be called /dev/sda4. The logical partitions will be called (in the order you create them) /dev/sda5, /dev/sda6 and /dev/sda7. You do not have to create the logical partitions in the order that I suggest; any order will be fine.


    • You will be able to read and write to your Windows folders from Kubuntu, but you cannot see your Kubuntu folders from Windows.


    • The purpose of splitting your root and /home into separate partitions is that if you really mess up your Kubuntu installation and need to reinstall, or you want to change (say) to Ubuntu, Xubuntu or even Mint, you can just (re)install without overwriting your /home. It makes it easier.

    If you hit errors or confusion, as BC59 says, just start a new thread. Post the thread link here so that we can find it.

    Quote Originally Posted by BC59 View Post
    ... normally you need the double of your RAM eg 2G RAM= 4G swap...
    On modern machines, that is no longer recommended. You are unlikely to need more than 4Gb swap, unless (as mentioned) you have more than 4Gb RAM, want to hibernate, and your /home folder is not encrypted.
    Full system encryption with dual-bootFull Circle MagazineProblems with WINE?
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  9. #9
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    Re: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    Quote Originally Posted by Paddy Landau View Post
    On modern machines, that is no longer recommended. You are unlikely to need more than 4Gb swap, unless (as mentioned) you have more than 4Gb RAM, want to hibernate, and your /home folder is not encrypted.
    You have right, I stuck to the good old method.

    How much swap do I need?
    As a base minimum, it's highly recommended that the swap space should be equal to the amount of physical memory (RAM). Also, it's recommended that the swap space is twice the amount of physical memory (RAM) depending upon the amount of hard disk space available for the system (although this "recommendation" dates back from a time when physical RAM was very expensive and most Unix systems ran with many processes in swap space - a situation that hardly applies in most situations these days, but ancient Unix/Linux myths like this "recommendation" tend to survive well past their "use by" dates). In reality, if you use hibernation you need what was outlined in the relevant paragraph above, otherwise you need as much swap space as your system will use - which actually may be very little in a modern hardware setup. The only downside to having more swap space than you will actually use is the disk space you will be reserving for it.

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    Re: Driver Problems in HP pavillion zd8000 (ubuntu/kubunto)

    Oh, and I forgot to add:


    • Back up all data before starting your partition shrinking. Although partition shrinking is reliable and well-tested, there is always a small chance of data loss.
    • After shrinking your F: drive, reboot Windows even if it does not ask you to do so.
    • Back up all data before starting your installation. Although the installation process is reliable and well-tested, there is always a small chance of data loss.
    Full system encryption with dual-bootFull Circle MagazineProblems with WINE?
    In my day, we had the outdoors in which to run, play, and socialise. Now people use computers for that.

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