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Thread: Another newbie question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
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    Another newbie question

    So, I will soon begin building my computer and enter the world of Linux. My question is since linux is supposed to be highly customizable, then how easy/hard would it be to get some of the different features of different linux distros into one made-for-me OS?

    I haven't dealt with a lot of linux distros, so I don't even know where to start on what I would do if I could do it. I like music production and streaming multimedia. There are also other features I would like to get, but I don't know what I would get yet.

    So again, how simple would it be to custome tailor Ubuntu to my specifications? Or would I be better of finding a different distro that I like?

    And I always hear folks talk about different types of Ubuntu or something. Like fiesty, lucid, maverick, etc. What does all that mean? Differences?

  2. #2
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    Re: Another newbie question

    Quote Originally Posted by CP2 View Post
    I like music production and streaming multimedia. There are also other features I would like to get, but I don't know what I would get yet.

    So again, how simple would it be to custome tailor Ubuntu to my specifications? Or would I be better of finding a different distro that I like?
    Sounds like Ubuntu Studio would be a good bet for you, have a look at ...

    http://ubuntustudio.org/

    And I always hear folks talk about different types of Ubuntu or something. Like fiesty, lucid, maverick, etc. What does all that mean? Differences?
    Each Ubuntu release has a code name during the development stage, prior to full release when they will usually be referred to by the release number, eg, 10.04, 10.10 - the numbers refer to the year and month of release.

    Your main choice would be either Lucid or Maverick, in that Lucid (10.4.1) is the current Long Term Support option and Maverick (10.10) is the current non Long Term Support release.
    Last edited by howefield; December 28th, 2010 at 07:53 PM.

  3. #3
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    Re: Another newbie question

    Quote Originally Posted by howefield View Post
    Sounds like Ubuntu Studio would be a good bet for you, have a look at ...

    http://ubuntustudio.org/



    Each Ubuntu release has a code name during the development stage, prior to full release when they will usually be referred to by the release number, eg, 10.04, 10.10 - the numbers refer to the year and month of release.

    Your main choice would be either Lucid or Maverick, in that Lucid (10.4.1) is the current Long Term Support option and Maverick (10.10) is the current non Long Term Support release.
    Ok now the codename thing makes sense. Are those usually stable? Are they made to be more stable than it's so called predecessor? Like 10.4.1 > 10.4 ???

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Inglis, Florida
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    Ubuntu 12.04 Precise Pangolin

    Re: Another newbie question

    Ubuntu Ultimate has many extra applications already installed:
    http://distrowatch.com/table.php?distribution=ultimate

    Although I don't use it either, I thought OpenArtist was pretty cool:
    http://openartisthq.org/
    Give me a stable operating system, and I will make it unstable

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
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    76

    Re: Another newbie question

    You can always pick and choose features as you like. You can start with a pretty vanilla maverick install and then add repositories for software that isn't in the default.

    For example, I use my eeepc 901 as a soft synth for my midi keyboard. I started with lUbuntu, then added the UbuntuStudio repositories to get the real-time kernel and a few other things.

  6. #6
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    Oct 2010
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    Re: Another newbie question

    Quote Originally Posted by K.J. View Post
    You can always pick and choose features as you like. You can start with a pretty vanilla maverick install and then add repositories for software that isn't in the default.

    For example, I use my eeepc 901 as a soft synth for my midi keyboard. I started with lUbuntu, then added the UbuntuStudio repositories to get the real-time kernel and a few other things.
    That sounds pretty cool. I'm new to the Linux thing, so I am not sure what EXACTLY you mean by repositories. Like a storage space for software packages? And what is this real time kernel you speak of? I'm KINDA familiar with what a kernel is, but could you possibly elaborate? I'm also going to wiki it, so you don't need to answer if you don't want to.

  7. #7
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    Dec 2009
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    76

    Re: Another newbie question

    Repositories are essentially what you described. They are central places that house software pre-compiled for your version of Linux. They are simple to add to apt, and since 9.10 (correct me if I'm wrong), you don't even need to worry about what version you are using or adding keys anymore. You simply add the repository in synaptic (the package manager) and then update. The software in the repository will be added to the list.

    The real-time kernel is a version of the linux kernel tweaked with a higher I/O clock. Essentially, it means I/O, like a midi instrument, will have a lower latency. Generally, when playing live you want your total latency to be around or under 10 ms, or else there will be a noticeable delay and may throw rhythm off.

  8. #8
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    Oct 2010
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    Re: Another newbie question

    Quote Originally Posted by K.J. View Post
    Repositories are essentially what you described. They are central places that house software pre-compiled for your version of Linux. They are simple to add to apt, and since 9.10 (correct me if I'm wrong), you don't even need to worry about what version you are using or adding keys anymore. You simply add the repository in synaptic (the package manager) and then update. The software in the repository will be added to the list.

    The real-time kernel is a version of the linux kernel tweaked with a higher I/O clock. Essentially, it means I/O, like a midi instrument, will have a lower latency. Generally, when playing live you want your total latency to be around or under 10 ms, or else there will be a noticeable delay and may throw rhythm off.
    Alrighty then cool. thanks for the info man. Much appreciated.

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