Quote Originally Posted by srs5694 View Post
Try this, if you're willing to wipe the disk:


  1. Boot an Ubuntu installer or an emergency disc, like Parted Magic or System Rescue CD. If using an Ubuntu installer, boot it into a recovery mode so that you can get a shell rather than booting straight into the installer.
  2. Launch a text-mode shell.
  3. If you're using an Ubuntu installer, type "sudo apt-get install gdisk" to obtain and install GPT fdisk (gdisk).
  4. Type "sudo gdisk /dev/sda" (you can omit "sudo" on some emergency disks).
  5. Type "o" and answer "y" to the verification prompt to create a fresh partition table. Note that this will wipe out all your existing partitions.
  6. Type "n" to create a new partition. Give values of: partition #1, start sector 2048, end sector +1M, hex code of EF02. This creates the BIOS Boot Partition.
  7. Type "n" to create another new partition. Give values of: partition #2, hit enter for the default start sector, end sector +20G (or however big you want the Ubuntu main installation to be, minus space for your user files), hex code of 0700 (the default). This creates what will be the Linux root (/) partition.
  8. Type "n" to create another new partition. Give values of: partition #3, hit enter for the default start sector, end sector +2G (or however big you want to make your swap space), hex code of 8200. This creates a Linux swap partition.
  9. Type "n" to create another new partition. Give values of: partition #4, hit enter for the default start sector, hit enter for the default end sector (to use the whole disk), hex code 0700 (the default). This creates what will be the Linux /home partition. If you want other partitions, you should set some other end value and create additional partitions at this point.
  10. Type "p" to review your partition table. It should have an EF02 BIOS Boot Partition, two Linux/Windows data partitions, and a Linux swap partition. If it doesn't, correct the problems or quit by typing "q" and start again.
  11. Type "w" to save the partition table.
  12. If necessary, reboot into the Ubuntu installer; or just launch the installation process. When you get to the disk partitioning section, tell the system to do custom partitioning, but do not start from scratch. Instead, tell it to use /dev/sda2 as root (/), /dev/sda3 as swap, and /dev/sda4 as /home. (Adjust these partition IDs as necessary, if you deviated from the numbers I specified earlier.) The installer will create new filesystems or swap space on these partitions. You should not tell the installer to do anything with /dev/sda1; when the system installs GRUB, the GRUB installer should use /dev/sda1 automatically.
  13. Continue with the installation.



It's possible to use GNU Parted or GParted instead of GPT fdisk in the preceding procedure. It may be possible to use the installer's disk partitioner, too, but I'm not positive of that. I just specified GPT fdisk because I'm more familiar with its syntax and I didn't want to experiment with other tools to write this reply.
God bless you, I am totally willing to wipe the disk and start over, and I will let you know how it goes in a few hours.