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Thread: /proc/partitions file meaning

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    /proc/partitions file meaning

    hello,
    my /proc/partitions file contains the following:

    major minor #blocks name

    8 0 244198584 sda
    8 1 241223680 sda1
    8 2 1 sda2
    8 5 2972672 sda5


    can anyone explain the meaning of this info?

    thanks.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Re: /proc/partitions file meaning

    anyone?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
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    Kubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat

    Re: /proc/partitions file meaning

    Well, the major number is 8 that indicates it to be a disk device. The minor ones are your partitions on the same device. 0 is your entire disk, 1 is your primary, 2 your extended and 5 your logical partition. The rest is of course block size and name of disk/partition.

    A "sudo fdisk -l" would have reinterpreted the same data in a slightly better way.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Re: /proc/partitions file meaning

    hi,

    first of all thanks for the kind reply.
    secondly, i didn't asked my question properly, since i know the info you gave me so i'll rephrase it:
    how can i know what data is in the sda5? i think its for swapping but i'm not sure.
    i indeed tried fdisk -l in advance but i get no answer. the man page for fdisk -l says that if i get no answer when typing it than i have the requested info in /proc/partitions.


    any suggestions?

  5. #5
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    Nov 2009
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    Kubuntu 10.10 Maverick Meerkat

    Re: /proc/partitions file meaning

    Did you add the "sudo" to fdisk -l . I'd be surprised if you get no output. Can you please post anything that you get after running that command?
    Also, take a look at (system->admin->system monitor) and go to the filesystems tab and see if you can spot /dev/sda5 there.
    Also try "sudo sfdisk -l /dev/sda".

    To see if it is swap, try "swapon -s". Check the swap entry listed in your /etc/fstab and compare it with the UUIDs available in "sudo blkid -c /dev/null".

    As a final resort, fire up gparted and see if that gives you any information.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    England
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    Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron

    Re: /proc/partitions file meaning

    In a root shell (su - or sudo -s), try running:

    Code:
    for i in /dev/sda?; do
    
    if (! fdisk -l|egrep "$i.*Extended"); then
    
    mount $i /mnt &&
    echo "$i:" &&
    ls /mnt &&
    umount /mnt
    
    echo
    
    fi
    
    done
    It will need fdisk to work, but, to be honest, if it doesn't then there is something very wrong with your system.

    This will try and mount every normal (non-extended) partition, list what's on it, unmount it and move on to the next.

    If it's a swap partition, mount will tell you that too.

    Hope it helps...
    Last edited by KeyserSoze93; August 17th, 2010 at 04:10 PM.
    My Website. Computing resources, photos, articles etc.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    South East Montana
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    Re: /proc/partitions file meaning

    Or you could fire up the live CD and take a look at your drive with gparted System>Administration>Gparted Partition Editor.

    You could also install gparted on your OS. I do not recommend this to you as you can do some major damage with it and I am not sure that you have the experience to avoid doing so.

    The live CD is safe, just look, do not format anything.
    Dell 480 XPS 3G ram Quad Core 2.40GHz, Radeon HD 2400 PRO, Audigy1, 3x320G HDD, 320G External, Debian Testing for use, Debian Squeeze for secure use, Debian Sid for FUN

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    11

    Re: /proc/partitions file meaning

    thanks guys,

    sudo fdisk -l did the trick.

    have a good day...

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